tech

Pogue's Basics: How to create a search-and-replace macro in Word

Pogue's Basics: How to create a search-and-replace macro in Word

Among its thousands of features, macros are power-user tools that could benefit a lot of people. You hit Record Macro, you do something — a search and replace, let’s say — and then you can play back that macro later. Actually, search and replace is a bad example — Microsoft Word cannot, in fact, record and play back a search/replace.

The first flying car is available for pre-order

The first flying car is available for pre-order

The company unveiled their flying car in 2014 but it was not commercially available. Now it’s ready and being presented at the Top Marques car show in Monaco. The vehicle is fully functional as both a car and an aircraft, and its hybrid engine makes it environmentally friendly.

The best ways to stream live TV without cable

The best ways to stream live TV without cable

Google’s YouTube TV is a solid streaming cable option, but is it the best? Google, though, is entering an increasingly crowded market with a wide variety of different channel offerings that can be difficult to parse when all you want to do is watch “The Bachelor” and eat your KFC $20 Fill-Up in your comfy chair. YouTube TV is missing Turner and Viacom properties.

Fitbit’s new smartwatch has been plagued by production mishaps

Fitbit’s new smartwatch has been plagued by production mishaps

Pictured: The Fitbit Blaze, which looks very similar to Fitbit’s upcoming smartwatch, based on an internal presentation deck seen by Yahoo Finance. Fitbit’s (FIT) first “proper” smartwatch and first-ever pair of bluetooth headphones are due out this fall after a series of production mishaps delayed the project, Yahoo Finance has learned. The fitness tracker company’s smartwatch project has been a troubled one.

Why Silicon Beach will still lure tech talent despite skyrocketing prices

Why Silicon Beach will still lure tech talent despite skyrocketing prices

Over the last two years, Venice has become one of the priciest neighborhoods in all of Los Angeles, thanks in part to the success of companies headquartered there like Snap. The new season of HBO’s “Silicon Valley” premieres this month, but the Bay Area tech scene depicted on that show is no longer the only game in town for America’s tech elite. Los Angeles has its own tech hub, dubbed Silicon Beach, a four-mile stretch of beachfront that encompasses Venice and Santa Monica and is home to Snapchat’s parent company, Snap (SNAP).

Robot arms are now teaching each other how to work

Robot arms are now teaching each other how to work

In “robots are taking over the world” news… This robot arm made by RightHand Robotics is teaching other robot arms how to pick up objects. The multifingered gripper was built with an extending suction tool in the middle and a camera that’s able to analyze objects to help determine the best way to pick them up and hold them. Images are processed by an algorithm that will then help other robot arms learn what to do. This new skill will help factories and fulfillment centers like Amazon’s to fill orders more efficiently. ...

Obsess over your dog even more with this smart pet door

Obsess over your dog even more with this smart pet door

People who want to know everything about their pets have a powerful new tool.  SureFlap, based in the UK, already makes a line of products connected to pets' implanted microchips. Now it's putting out an app-enabled pet door for cats and small dogs.  SEE ALSO: Finally, you can vacuum clean your dog It should be pretty straightforward to start tracking your pet with the ultimate pet surveillance set-up, called the Microchip Pet Door Connect. You install the pet door just like any cat or small doggie door. You plug in the "hub" which connects the door to the internet. Then your cat comes slinking in from the garden and you get a notification on your smartphone.  Beyond letting you know when your pet comes and goes, the flap is smart enough to be set to lock or unlock, which you can control from the app. As the site a bit creepily suggests, "create a curfew" for your dog. Or "protect your home," since you can now block out neighborhood cats and strays from coming in. So much power. Like company's already-available cat flap and pet feeder, this new product uses pets' microchips. But if they don't have one implanted, RFID collar tags work, too, and are conveniently sold by the British pet tech company. It's coming out this summer for about $200, per the Verge, just in time for tracking Fido's every single move.  WATCH: Finally, you can vacuum clean your dog

Artificial intelligence is now trying to make sense out of the mess that is Congress

Artificial intelligence is now trying to make sense out of the mess that is Congress

Governing is hard. Predicting what the, ahem, disjointed members of Congress are going to do on any given day is even harder.  So why not give your noggin a little rest and let artificial intelligence do it for you? SEE ALSO: Microsoft CEO says artificial intelligence is the 'ultimate breakthrough' Enter PredictGov, a website that uses machine learning to try and determine the future of congressional bills. Will they pass? Won't they? Now you can spend your time only freaking out about, say, the erosion of your privacy thanks to Congress, instead of all the additional garbage that may or may not get signed into law.  Pretty neat, huh? (As an added bonus, all that extra cognitive space will come in handy as you prep for the inevitable eco-apocalypse).  The brainchild of Vanderbilt University law Professor J.B. Ruhl and computer scientist and doctoral candidate John Nay, PredictGov is more than just some rando-pundit dude's attempt to sound smart on cable TV.  There's data in them thar hills.  "It pulls from decades of congressional data plus hundreds of variables, including the bill’s sponsor, amendments, economic trends and political shifts," reads a press release. "Each bill’s score updates every 24 hours, accounting for amendments that jump on or off." But what, other than the aforementioned aid in disaster prep, is this service good for? Well, potentially a lot.  "Based on our deep learning A.I. system, we provide updated predictions for the bills currently under consideration, assigning each a chance of being enacted," the website explains. "This freely available resource allows you to focus on legislation that is likely to matter and offers a glimpse into the power of our more advanced subscription-based tools." In other words, it could save you from lobbying against the latest congressional monstrosity that has little-to-no chance of passing and allow you to focus on one that does.  As to the accuracy of PredictGov's predictions? It may be too early to say for sure, but either way it lets you outsource one more cognitive task. And that, in these confounding times, is a big ole plus.  WATCH: This inventor built a real-life 'Iron Man' suit and it's awesome

Gay tech workers earn less than their straight counterparts

Gay tech workers earn less than their straight counterparts

LGBTQ tech workers earn thousands of dollars less annually versus their heterosexual counterparts. LGBTQ workers in tech earn significantly less than their heterosexual counterparts, a new study reports. Heterosexual men in tech, for example, earn an average salary of $120,412, while LGBTQ men typically earn nearly $3,000 less.

How BlackBerry stays relevant in the age of the iPhone

How BlackBerry stays relevant in the age of the iPhone

A reporter uses a Blackberry device to photograph Blackberry CEO John Chen as he speaks to reporters following their annual general meeting for shareholders in Waterloo, Canada in this June 23, 2015. BlackBerry (BBRY) may not be the hip smartphone giant it once was, but the Canadian business is still alive and kicking based on its new fourth-quarter earnings report. BlackBerry announced better-than-expected earnings for the sixth straight quarter Friday, with revenues of $297 million, beating analysts’ estimate of $289 million.

The McAfee brand is back again after Intel finalizes spin-off

The McAfee brand is back again after Intel finalizes spin-off

After existing as a sub-brand of Intel (INTC) for the past seven years and being rebranded as Intel Security, the company best know for that little shield logo in your computer’s toolbar has finalized its split from the chipmaker and will now be run as an independent organization. Intel purchased the antivirus organization for $7.68 billion in 2010. At the time, the chipmaker hoped to fold McAfee’s security capabilities into Intel’s chips to better protect consumers’ devices.

Pogue's Basics: The secret keystroke that shows the Mac's invisible files

Pogue's Basics: The secret keystroke that shows the Mac's invisible files

On the Mac, it’s sometimes helpful to be able to see all the invisible files that teem on your drive, especially if you’re a pretty competent techie. But how can you make them appear? If you’ve ever heard someone tell you, the procedure probably involved typing some arcane Terminal command, or downloading a shareware program.

The cheapest way to watch baseball online

The cheapest way to watch baseball online

St. Louis Cardinals’ Dexter Fowler, left, scores past Chicago Cubs catcher Willson Contreras during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, April 2, 2017, in St. Louis. The 2017 Major League Baseball season will feature something that once seemed utterly implausible — no, not just the Chicago Cubs raising a new World Series championship flag at Wrigley Field. This year, baseball fans who don’t subscribe to cable or satellite TV services will finally be able to stream their teams’ games through one of the cheapest video services around, Sling TV, without having to resort to illegal workarounds.

Some Facebook users are seeing a rocket icon in their app. Here's what it does

Some Facebook users are seeing a rocket icon in their app. Here's what it does

In recent weeks, some users have started noticing a rocket-shaped icon in their Facebook mobile app.  The icon, positioned right next to the main news feed icon, gives you a different type of news feed, one which displays popular posts from people and pages that you haven't befriended or liked.  SEE ALSO: Facebook's new emoji are finally available to everyone I've had the new feature on my Android phone for at least three weeks now, though it tends to disappear and reappear every now and then. (I’m based in Croatia, but there are also reports of users seeing the new icon in the UK.) The rocket feed offers a great deal of local content, so it's possible that it's showing posts that are popular near my geographical location. However, I'm also seeing some posts that are relevant to my interests, so it might not be completely disassociated from my likes/friends.  Most of the posts I'm seeing in the new feed are from pages (some of which I've liked), and some are from users that aren't my friends. Image: Stan Schroeder/Mashable The new feed seems to be remarkably similar to Instagram's Explore tab, which shows you posts that the company's algorithms have determined to be relevant to your interests.  UPDATE: April 3, 2017, 2 p.m. CEST A reader (thanks, Petar) sent us a few screenshots of the new feature as seen on the iPhone, where it is slightly different. Here, the new feed (labeled "Explore") has more of a magazine vibe to it, with two news items laid out side by side.  The new Explore feed looks a little different on the iPhone. Image: Petar Zivkovic This isn't the first time Facebook is testing a different type of news feed on a (typically small) subset of its users. For example, in April 2016 we've seen a new style of news feed which shows stories clustered around certain topics.  Mashable has contacted Facebook for more details on this new feature and will update the post when we hear back from them.  WATCH: Check out WhatsApp's new Statuses

Now I Get It: Bitcoin

Now I Get It: Bitcoin

Man, if anything needs the “now I get it” treatment, it’s Bitcoin. You hear about it all the time in financial and technical circles—but most people really don’t grasp it.

Major ISPs now say they won't sell your browsing history. Yeah. Right.

Major ISPs now say they won't sell your browsing history. Yeah. Right.

Internet service providers are in an awkward spot. After getting all dressed up for the sell-your-data dance, it turns out they'll be staying home.  Or so they claim. Reuters reports that representatives from Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T all came out today to assure worried consumers that the companies will not in fact sell customers' browsing histories to the highest bidder.  "We do not sell our broadband customers’ individual web browsing history," writes Comcast Chief Privacy Officer Gerard Lewis on the company's blog . "We did not do it before the FCC’s rules were adopted, and we have no plans to do so."   But should we trust Lewis and his counterparts at AT&T and Verizon? SEE ALSO: The software that could prevent ISPs from selling your browsing history could also just make things worse The denials were issued after the House and Senate voted to repeal landmark consumer privacy rules passed in 2016 that would have blocked internet service providers from selling the browsing history of their customers.  The public backlash has been strong — people are even donating to GoFundMes seeking to buy the browsing histories of members of Congress (although the success of those efforts is very much in doubt as no one is currently selling a "Congress's Browsing History" package deal) — and major ISPs are rushing to tell everyone that hey hey hey, we're the good guys here. And yet.  The Electronic Frontier Foundation's Kate Tummarello points out the obvious incongruity of ISPs denying that they plan to take advantage of the new privacy landscape when those same companies lobbied so hard to bring it about.  "Those rules were a huge victory for consumers," Tummarello wrote on the EFF blog of the to-be-repealed rules. "Of course, the ISPs that stand to make money off of violating your privacy have been lobbying Congress to repeal those rules. Unfortunately, their anti-consumer push has been working." What's more, it's not like internet service providers haven't creeped hard on customers before. They most certainly have.  "Consumers have every reason to be skeptical about what the ISPs say," the EFF's Karen Gullo wrote to Mashable, "because, as we have pointed out, they have already tried many of the practices — including hijacking your searches — that they are now allowed to do thanks to the party-line vote in Congress." Spokespersons for Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T can proclaim their devotion to your privacy all they want, but if the past is any indication you'd be right to remain skeptical. WATCH: Terrifying face gadget promises to keep your conversations private in public places

Trump is going after the open internet next

Trump is going after the open internet next

The Trump administration is eyeing big changes to net neutrality rules. The Trump’s administration’s campaign to reverse President Obama’s tech-policy moves won’t stop with this week’s vote by the House to shut down internet-privacy regulations. On Thursday, President Trump’s press secretary Sean Spicer made it clear that the legal foundation of net neutrality, which prevents broadband providers from limiting access speeds to certain sides, is also on Trump’s hit list.

Google Maps turns into Ms. Pac-Man for April Fools’ Day

Google Maps turns into Ms. Pac-Man for April Fools’ Day

No your eyes are not playing tricks on you – your mobile Google Maps app did just turn into a Ms. Pac-Man game. Google’s gag is just in time for April Fools’ Day. The game plays on real-life streets from wherever you are. You get the full Pac-Man experience, including the infamous sound effects. Just open up your app and you can start playing. Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/play-ms-pac-man-google-maps-april-fools-day-trick-2017-3 More:

This AI device will be your personal assistant for the car 

This AI device will be your personal assistant for the car 

Meet Chris. The first AI device to keep your digital life connected while you’re behind the wheel. The no-touch gadget is designed for drivers so they can keep their eyes on the road. Chris listens and talks to you using artificial intelligence and understands speech recognition and gesture control. Now when you get a call, voicemail, Facebook, What’s App, or email message, you can safely answer without taking your eyes off the road. The company that makes it, German Autolabs, says you can also control music and navigation. ...

Lyft made these goofy wearables as a prank but they're actually kind of cool

Lyft made these goofy wearables as a prank but they're actually kind of cool

Would you believe it if Lyft rolled out an actual, physical product to hail a ride? A one-use wearable, giving you streamlined access to all the service's cars at the lyft (lolz) of your thumb? You shouldn't believe it — well, not completely. The ride-hailing app is currently shilling Mono, a wearable with some legitimately cool specs: it has BLE tech to pair with your phone, a micro-controller synched with the Lyft API that reads gyroscope and accelerometer data to request rides, and motion-triggered LED confirmation indicators to let you know your trip status without having to check your phone.   Just stick your thumb in the air wearing the Mono, Lyft claims, and you'll soon be ferried on your way.  SEE ALSO: Lyft just came out with its biggest innovation yet: buses But you'll (probably) never see someone rocking a Mono to get a ride home after a night out on the town — it's April Fools' Day season again, and the wearable is Lyft's idea of a viral prank, designed to confound the internet and get us all buzzing. The only problem is, Lyft didn't just make a joke prototype for a one-off photoshoot — the company went all the way in, creating actual working Mono devices.  Sure, we have all the hallmarks of a viral prank campaign — a slightly ridiculous concept that's just believable enough, especially with the hyped-up videos and web presence to back it up. But bringing Mono to life makes it less a prank and more a one-off promotion, like Pizza Hut's pie-ordering sneakers for March Madness.  We're giving away 5 Monos! Post a photo of the Mono on Twitter/Instagram tagging @lyft, #GetMono, and #Sweepstakes. https://t.co/O58NUdhPSh pic.twitter.com/jb4ZjqYaIY — Lyft (@lyft) March 30, 2017 It's almost like Snapchat Spectacles on a small scale: a wearable created to give users a physical extension of an experience typically tethered to smartphones. Mono's little more than a novelty item — obviously, no one's really gonna walk around with their thumb in the air more than once or twice for kicks — but it is kinda cool looking and, dare I say it, fun.  That's what April Fool's is all about, right? We'll cut Lyft some slack here for the full-out effort even with the botched delivery — just as long as they don't immediately start bragging about how #woke hailing a car with your thumb can be.  WATCH: I tried a self-driving car in London and lived to tell the tale

Windows 10 Creators Update: Microsoft's best just got better

Windows 10 Creators Update: Microsoft's best just got better

One of the key reasons Apple’s (AAPL) Mac became so popular was that, in addition to its good looks and powerful performance, it catered to creative types. Available April 11, the Creators Update is designed to serve as the backbone of Microsoft’s Windows Mixed Reality capabilities. Originally called Windows Holographic, Windows Mixed Reality will allow developers to create mixed reality devices like Microsoft’s Hololens for the consumer market.

Samsung's new Galaxy S8 is more expensive than Apple's iPhone 7

Samsung's new Galaxy S8 is more expensive than Apple's iPhone 7

Samsung’s Galaxy S8 looks like the phone of the year, but it’ll cost a bit more than the iPhone. Samsung’s Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus are finally here, and they’re just what the company needs after last year’s Note7 fiasco. The Verizon version of the Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus will retail for $720 and $840, respectively.

Pick up your AmazonFresh order without leaving your car

Pick up your AmazonFresh order without leaving your car

AmazonFresh is testing out a new delivery service in Seattle called AmazonFresh Pickup. Shoppers will be able to order their items online, drive to a grocery pickup location and have them delivered to their car in 15 minutes. You don’t even have to get out of your car. The service will be free to Amazon Prime members, with no minimum order – in the hope of increasing Amazon’s physical retail presence. If Pickup takes off, it could change the game for all “click and collect” grocery retailers in the future. Source: https://www.cnet.com/news/amazon-fresh-pickup-prime-revealed-seattle/

Why Snap may be more like Twitter than Facebook

Why Snap may be more like Twitter than Facebook

S&P Global Market Intelligence applied a credit score to Snap in the run-up to its IPO. The result: A suggested credit score of “b,” which is more in line with peers like Twitter and Yelp during their IPO periods than Facebook.

Congress votes to roll back internet privacy protection

Congress votes to roll back internet privacy protection

Update: On Tuesday afternoon, the House approved the bill to stop the FCC from enforcing its internet privacy rules. The bill now goes to President Donald Trump for approval. The House was expected to vote Tuesday on a bill that would stop the Federal Communications Commission from enforcing rules that would stop your internet service provider from tracking your browsing behavior and selling that information to advertisers.

This tiny iOS change will make your iPhone even zippier

This tiny iOS change will make your iPhone even zippier

Apple rolled out the new iOS 10.3 update Monday — and if you took the plunge and upgraded to the new OS, you might have noticed your iPhone is running a bit more quickly and smoothly than it did before.   That alone shouldn't be a big surprise. New software should make your phone hum, and this update in particular includes a fancy new modern file system that has played a part in freeing up more storage space on devices than the previous OS.  SEE ALSO: Definitely don't follow these DIY steps to give your red iPhone 7 a black front But that's not the only reason your iPhone now has some extra pep, according to Apple engineer Renaud Lienhart. He took to Twitter to reveal one of the undocumented tweaks to the OS.    iOS 10.3 feels “snappier” because many animations were slightly tweaked & shortened, for the better. — Renaud Lienhart (@NotoriousBUGS) March 28, 2017 The animations he's talking about come when you open, close or switch between apps, as BGR notes. This doesn't mean the apps will be running faster when you use them — it has to do more with improved responsiveness, which I noticed right away while switching between open apps on the new OS. It's a small change, but it makes multitasking on the iPhone even more seamless than before. You should update your device to iOS 10.3 for more than just the speed boost, too. It's always a good call to keep your phone's OS current, since updates usually fix issues and bugs, like the Safari ransom bug that 10.3 knocked out. That, and you'll finally be able to track down pesky AirPods when they get lost and avoid dropping a $69 fee (not nice) for a replacement.  WATCH: A new way to take selfies — and six other features the iPhone 8 might have

internet

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

President Trump lost his first fight over health care and Monday night he appeared to back off threats to force Democrats and Republicans to pay for the border wall. Fmr. GOP Congressman David Jolly and MNSBC's Joy Reid join Lawrence O'Donnell.

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Two conservative groups filed a lawsuit against the University of California at Berkeley claiming that a decision to cancel an appearance by the firebrand pundit Ann Coulter violated their right to free speech. The Berkeley College Republicans and Young America's Foundation, which had invited Coulter to speak on April 27, accused the university of seeking to silence conservative viewpoints and stifle political discourse at the famously progressive campus by imposing unreasonable demands on campus events involving certain "high-profile" speakers. "Defendants' discriminatory imposition of curfew and venue restrictions has resulted in the cancellation of two speaking engagements featuring prominent conservative speakers in the month of April, 2017," read the lawsuit filed in federal court in San Francisco.

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

The United States on Tuesday expressed "deep concern" over Turkish air strikes against Kurdish fighters in Syria and Iraq and said they were not authorized by the U.S.-led coalition fighting Islamic State. The raids in Iraq's Sinjar region and northeast Syria killed at least 20 in a campaign against groups linked to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), which has waged a three-decade insurgency against Turkey for Kurdish autonomy. Turkey is part of the U.S.-led military coalition fighting militants in Syria.

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Gov. Asa Hutchinson issued an order in February to execute eight men in 10 days in April because the state's stock of midazolam, a key lethal injection drug, expires at the end of the month.

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Several mummies and more than 1,000 figurines have been discovered at an ancient cemetery located at Luxor in Egypt, archaeologists reported. A team of archaeologists with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities uncovered the funerary complex during the ministry's ongoing excavations at the site. The funerary complex contains multiple tombs that were originally built for a man named Userhat, who was a judge in Luxor sometime during what modern-day archaeologists call Egypt's New Kingdom (1550–1070 B.C.) period, the ministry said in a statement.

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

Retail banking giant Wells Fargo has fixed problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan and will now be allowed to open new international branches, US banking regulators said Monday. A Treasury Department agency found this month found the bank's board as early as 2005 had received "regular" reports that employee firings and internal ethics complaints were related to unethical sales practices. Monday's announcement reversed an action taken by the Federal Reserve Board and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, which in December jointly found that Wells Fargo had failed to remedy problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan.

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

By David Mardiste AMARI AIR BASE, Estonia (Reuters) - Two of the U.S. Air Force's newest and most advanced jets landed in the Baltic state of Estonia for the first time on Tuesday, a symbolic gesture meant to reinforce the United States' commitment to the defense of NATO allies that border Russia. The visit of the F-35 stealth fighters, which flew from Britain and spent several hours in Estonia, is part of broader U.S. jet pilot training across Europe as the NATO alliance seeks to deter Moscow from any possible incursion in the Baltics. "This is a very clear message," Estonia's Defense Minister Margus Tsahkna told Reuters.

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

The US State Department has been caught promoting Donald Trump’s Florida golf club Mar-a-Lago, in another apparent ethics violation by the administration. The US Embassy in London's website, which the department is responsible for, featured an article titled “Mar a Lago: Winter White House”. It said Mr Trump “is not the first president to have access to Mar-a-Lago as a Florida retreat, but he is the first one to use it”.

Tennessee teacher planned to take 15-year-old girl to Mexico

Tennessee teacher planned to take 15-year-old girl to Mexico

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A Tennessee teacher charged with kidnapping a 15-year-old student and driving her to California had planned to take the girl to Mexico and took a boat from San Diego on a test run, according to federal court documents filed Monday.

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

The stated objective of the Hezbollah-coordinated press tour of southern Lebanon was to see new Israeli defensive installations on the border – indications, according to the powerful Shiite Lebanese militia, of Israeli fears of Hezbollah’s growing military might. The unprecedented spectacle appeared to be a deliberate and calculated breach of a UN Security Council resolution that bans non-state forces from bearing arms in southern Lebanon, and it illustrated the unmatched sway Hezbollah wields, and the impunity it enjoys throughout the country. Recommended: Hezbollah 101: Who is the militant group, and what does it want?

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

After months of college application tasks and an anxious waiting period, high school seniors are starting to receive college acceptance letters. Many students may be relieved, but the hard work isn't necessarily over. Two current undergraduates recently shared their college decision strategies to help you prepare to pick a college before National College Decision Day on May 1.

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

French presidential frontrunner Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday rejected accusations he was resting on his laurels after winning the first round of the election, insisting "nothing's won yet" in the race against the far right's Marine Le Pen. The 39-year-old centrist said his victory in Sunday's first round of voting was proof that pollsters -- who had long placed him second to Le Pen in the opening round -- "get it wrong". "Nothing's won yet," Macron said during a visit to a hospital near Paris.

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

A new survey commissioned by Comcast has ranked apartment-dweller's need for good internet, relative to other niceties like basic hygiene. The conclusion seems to be that good Wi-Fi and high-speed internet are viewed as being the most critical. Comcast probably commissioned this survey to show how relevant its brand is to millennials or something, but the only actual truth to be found is this: Comcast knows that you will put up with basically anything to get good internet, so it's going to squeeze you for every last penny. The survey polled 2015 building managers and developers in the US about what features are the most important for prospective renters. A majority (59%) had either Wi-Fi access or fast internet as the most important feature, comfortably beating out a washer-dryer in unit as the must-have. This isn't so much a statement on the value of technology as it is a stunning indictment of broadband technology in the US. In a supposedly technology-literate, competitive, first-world country, access to the internet should be a given. But thanks to the oligopoly of cable companies that control access to the internet with very little regional competition, you're often left with little or no choice of cable providers. That means that if Verizon or Comcast only choose to supply your building with a 10Mbps, you're out of luck. So really, this survey just confirms to Comcast an important fact about its customers: it doesn't matter how bad the customer service is or if it flat-out calls its customers idiots: you don't have any choice and you need internet, so pucker up, lucky consumers.

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

By Dan Levine SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A U.S. judge on Tuesday blocked President Donald Trump's executive order that sought to withhold federal funds from so-called sanctuary cities, dealing another legal blow to the administration's efforts to toughen immigration enforcement. The ruling from U.S. District Judge William Orrick III in San Francisco said Trump's Jan. 25 order targeted broad categories of federal funding for sanctuary governments and that plaintiffs challenging the order were likely to succeed in proving it unconstitutional.

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

MIAMI (AP) — A former Haitian coup leader and recently elected senator in that country pleaded guilty Monday to a U.S. drug money-laundering charge under a deal that should allow him to avoid a potential sentence of life in prison for cocaine trafficking.

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish warplanes struck suspected Kurdish rebel positions in Iraq and Syria on Tuesday, drawing condemnation from Baghdad and criticism from the U.S.-led coalition fighting the Islamic State group, which is allied with Kurdish factions in both countries.

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

Global warming has pushed the Arctic into a new state unprecedented in human history, with thinning and retreating sea ice, skyrocketing air and sea temperatures, melting permafrost, and glaciers that are shedding ice at increasing rates.  All of these impacts and more may seem remote at first — after all, few of us live in Nunavut — but if you're a coastal resident anywhere in the world, from New York City to Dhaka, Bangladesh, what happens in the Arctic will affect you during the next several decades and beyond, primarily through sea level rise.  SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming The economic effects of all Arctic warming impacts may be enough to dent the gross domestic product of some countries, with cost estimates ranging from $7 trillion to $90 trillion by the end of this century. These are the conclusions of a new, comprehensive assessment of the Arctic climate by a division of the Arctic Council — a cooperative, governing body that helps oversee development in the Far North.  Sea ice (TOP) meets land as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft above Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesThe scientific report, released on Tuesday, is known as Snow, Water, Ice, and Permafrost in the Arctic, or SWIPA. About 90 scientists helped produce the report, while more than two-dozen experts peer-reviewed the results.  The document contains two key findings that anyone concerned about the future of not just the Arctic, but the entire globe, should take note of.  The first is that the Arctic Ocean could be free of summer sea ice starting as early as the late 2030s, which is earlier than other estimates have shown. The second is that rapid Arctic warming is driving greater melting of land ice in the region, which led scientists to conclude that consensus projections of global sea level rise made in 2013 are too conservative. Compared to the previous SWIPA report, which was produced in 2011, the new assessment paints a far more dire picture of an Arctic climate in overdrive.  It also offers hope that action can be taken now to slow down and eventually stabilize Arctic warming after about the year 2050. But time is running out. Even with rapid action to curb global warming pollutants like carbon dioxide and methane, the Arctic most of us grew up with — featuring thick sea ice making the region virtually impenetrable year-round — is gone, and is not likely to return anytime in the next century.  Sea ice thickness trends, showing the thinning trend in recent years.Image: zack labe"... The Arctic of today is different in many respects from the Arctic of the past century, or even the Arctic of 20 years ago," the report states. "Many of the changes underway are due to a simple fact: Ice, snow, and frozen ground — the components of the Arctic cryosphere — are sensitive to heat."  Based on computer model projections, the report states that average fall and winter temperatures in the Arctic will increase up to 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, above late 20th century values by the middle of the century, even if relatively stringent greenhouse gas emissions cuts are made.  Such temperature thresholds are already being reached in some months, with January 2016 recording a temperature anomaly of 9 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981-2010 average for the region, with even higher anomalies seen during October through February of the same year.  This past winter was the warmest on record for the Arctic, and for the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter. This has left sea ice in a precariously thin and sparse state as the upcoming melt season nears.  The report contains valuable findings on what would happen to Arctic climate change if the world were to come close to meeting the goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement. That treaty, which went into force in November 2016, aims to keep global warming to well under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through the year 2100.  It's unclear whether the agreement's goals are still feasible, considering that the U.S. — the world's second-largest emitter — is considering pulling out of it altogether, and other nations have yet to offer plans to cut their emissions in line with the temperature target.  A "drunken forest" in Fairbanks Alaska where trees are collapsing into the ground due to permafrost melt.Image: Warming Images/REX/ShutterstockMeeting the Paris targets would help slow the pace and reduce the severity of Arctic warming, but it "would not stabilize the loss of Arctic glaciers, ice sheets, and ice caps," the report states.  "The recent SWIPA assessment tells that the changes in the Arctic are bound to continue at the current rate until mid-century," said Morten Skovgaard Olsen, who chaired the new report, in an email.  "But it also tells that immediate and ambitious green-house gas reductions will slow the speed of changes beyond mid-century and even stabilize change beyond mid century, preventing major further impacts associated with the Arctic melt .” Any carbon pollution cuts made now will have the most significant influence on what the Arctic will look like after about 2050, the report's authors said at a press conference Tuesday in Virginia.  “The changes are cumulative, and so what we do in the next 5 years is really important on slowing down the changes that will happen in the next 30 or 40 years," said James Overland, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  "The emphasis on action and immediacy is one of the main findings” from the report, he said.  NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice near Pituffik, Greenland.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesForeign ministers from the eight Arctic nations will meet in Fairbanks, Alaska on May 11 to discuss these findings and other issues pertaining to the region. Some discussion on the Paris agreement may take place, particularly along the sidelines of the talks. According to the SWIPA report, meltwater from Arctic glaciers has contributed 35 percent of current sea level rise, with the greatest contribution coming from Greenland.  The planet's largest island lost an average of 375 gigatons of ice per year. This is equivalent to losing a block of ice measuring 4.6 miles on all sides, from 2011 to 2014 alone. It amounts to twice the melt rate from 2003 to 2008. In addition, thawing permafrost is harming infrastructure from Alaska to Siberia, with landslides and mysterious craters swallowing parts of the Russian Arctic.  In Alaska, the report found that wildfires in taiga forests are worse now than at any time in the past 10,000 years, due to hotter, drier summers and earlier spring snowmelt. WATCH: Stunning drone footage captures rare video of blue whales feeding

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

The US Supreme Court on Monday turned back an appeal by rights groups seeking to make public a damning report on the CIA's post-September 11 torture program, ensuring it will remain secret. The court rebuffed arguments from the American Civil Liberties Union that the highly classified report, compiled in 2014 by the Senate Intelligence Committee, should be released based on US government transparency rules. "We are disappointed by this major setback for government transparency and accountability.

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

By Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United States slammed South Sudan's President Salva Kiir on Tuesday for the African state's "man-made" famine and ongoing conflict, urging him to fulfill a month-old pledge of a unilateral truce by ordering his troops back to their barracks. "We must see a sign that progress is possible," U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley told a United Nations Security Council briefing on South Sudan. "We must see that ceasefire implemented." South Sudan descended into civil war in 2013 after Kiir fired his deputy, unleashing a conflict that has spawned armed factions often following ethnic lines.

20 Ways To Save Money

20 Ways To Save Money

Some are tougher to achieve than others, and you'll need to weigh the necessary sacrifice against the return.

Behold: This Galaxy Note 8 blows the Galaxy S8 out of the water

Behold: This Galaxy Note 8 blows the Galaxy S8 out of the water

Samsung's Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ were finally released this past Friday, and it seems like the phones are already well on their way to becoming a smash hit. The South Korean electronics giant announced Monday morning that combined Galaxy S8 and S8+ pre-orders out-sold Samsung's previous-generation Galaxy S7 and S7 edge by 30%. As a quick reminder, the S7 and S7 edge were Samsung's best-selling phones ever. If you picked up a new Galaxy S8 on Friday or over the weekend, rest assured that you now hold the most stunning smartphones that have ever existed. They're also two of the most powerful smartphones that have ever existed. In fact, there's almost nothing on Earth that could possibly give you buyer's remorse. Almost nothing... When an early adopter buys a new flagship iPhone, he or she knows that there will be a full year to wait (and save up money) before an even better new flagship iPhone launches. In Samsung's case, however, there's a much shorter buffer in between flagship releases. In the first half of each year, Samsung updates its Galaxy S lineup. The Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ are the company's flagship smartphones for the first half of 2017 and as you read in our Galaxy S8 review, they're incredible. Then, in the second half of 2017, Samsung will update its Note line with the all-new Galaxy Note 8. If the Note 8 looks anything like this, Galaxy S8 and S8+ owners should prepare to be very, very jealous. Graphic designer Muhsin M. Belaal Auckburaully teamed up with YouTube channel DBS Designing to completely reimagine Samsung's Galaxy Note series using design cues from the Galaxy S8 along with rumors we've heard so far. The results, as you can see, are absolutely stunning. Unlike most concept smartphones we see out there, this Galaxy Note 8 is actually rooted in reality. It likely doesn't look exactly like the Note 8 Samsung will release later this year, but we're willing to bet that it's close. Hopefully Samsung sticks with the precedent set by the Galaxy S8, however, and ditches that distracting logo from the front of the phone. As for specs, Auckburaully stays well within the realm of reality by sticking with the rumors we've heard so far. The Note 8 should feature a huge 6.4-inch QHD+ display and a screen-to-body ratio that's even better than the 83% ratio on the Galaxy S8. Other expected specs include 6GB of RAM, 64GB or 128GB of storage, microSDXC support, a new dual-lens rear camera setup, an iris scanner, and a huge 4,000 mAh battery that hopefully doesn't explode. More images of Auckburaully's Galaxy Note 8 design can be seen on his Behance page, and a video featuring the design is embedded below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0p3CAs9ZP0

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

Less than two years after officially launching its Pony Car beyond its domestic US borders, the Ford Mustang is the world's best-selling sportscar. In all, Ford sold 150,000 Mustangs around the world in 2016 which, according to the latest industry data from IHS Markit, means the car is not only America's most popular sportscar, it has now conquered the world, too, despite some hard-hitting European and Japanese competition. The Mustang has outsold the Mazda MX-5 Miata, BMW 4 Series, Nissan 370Z and the venerable Porsche 911 among others to claim the top spot, leaving many to ponder why it took Ford so long -- 51 years -- to finally offer its most famous muscle car to European and Asian customers.

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

SAO PAULO (AP) — Twelve men suspected of taking part in a dramatic, multimillion-dollar theft from an armored car company in a Paraguayan border city have been arrested in Brazil, officials in the Brazilian Federal Police said Tuesday.

Iran nuclear deal under review as uncertainty grows

Iran nuclear deal under review as uncertainty grows

Iran and major powers met Tuesday in Vienna to review adherence to their 2015 nuclear deal as uncertainty grows about the landmark accord's future under US President Donald Trump. The regular quarterly meeting heard, as Washington confirmed last week, that Iran is sticking to its side of the deal with the United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany, diplomats said. The accord saw Tehran drastically curb its nuclear activities in order to ease concerns that Iran wanted to build an atomic bomb.

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

Reports of American workers being short on their retirement funds are rampant. The National Institute on Retirement Security frames the "underfunded" issue in real dollar terms, noting that retirement savings are "dangerously low", and the U.S. retirement savings deficit is between $6.8 and $14 trillion. Yes, too many Americans are underfunded in the retirement accounts -- but how do you know exactly how much you're underfunded?

Scots don't want another independence vote: Kantar poll

Scots don't want another independence vote: Kantar poll

Most Scottish voters do not want another referendum on independence from the United Kingdom and support for secession itself appears to have weakened, according to a Kantar survey. Scots voted by a wide margin to stick with the European Union in last June's referendum, clashing with the UK as a whole which voted to leave. Scotland's devolved government, run by the Scottish National Party (SNP), says this means the country should be given a new chance to decide whether it wants to split from the UK.

gadgets

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

President Trump lost his first fight over health care and Monday night he appeared to back off threats to force Democrats and Republicans to pay for the border wall. Fmr. GOP Congressman David Jolly and MNSBC's Joy Reid join Lawrence O'Donnell.

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Two conservative groups filed a lawsuit against the University of California at Berkeley claiming that a decision to cancel an appearance by the firebrand pundit Ann Coulter violated their right to free speech. The Berkeley College Republicans and Young America's Foundation, which had invited Coulter to speak on April 27, accused the university of seeking to silence conservative viewpoints and stifle political discourse at the famously progressive campus by imposing unreasonable demands on campus events involving certain "high-profile" speakers. "Defendants' discriminatory imposition of curfew and venue restrictions has resulted in the cancellation of two speaking engagements featuring prominent conservative speakers in the month of April, 2017," read the lawsuit filed in federal court in San Francisco.

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

The United States on Tuesday expressed "deep concern" over Turkish air strikes against Kurdish fighters in Syria and Iraq and said they were not authorized by the U.S.-led coalition fighting Islamic State. The raids in Iraq's Sinjar region and northeast Syria killed at least 20 in a campaign against groups linked to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), which has waged a three-decade insurgency against Turkey for Kurdish autonomy. Turkey is part of the U.S.-led military coalition fighting militants in Syria.

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Gov. Asa Hutchinson issued an order in February to execute eight men in 10 days in April because the state's stock of midazolam, a key lethal injection drug, expires at the end of the month.

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Several mummies and more than 1,000 figurines have been discovered at an ancient cemetery located at Luxor in Egypt, archaeologists reported. A team of archaeologists with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities uncovered the funerary complex during the ministry's ongoing excavations at the site. The funerary complex contains multiple tombs that were originally built for a man named Userhat, who was a judge in Luxor sometime during what modern-day archaeologists call Egypt's New Kingdom (1550–1070 B.C.) period, the ministry said in a statement.

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

Retail banking giant Wells Fargo has fixed problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan and will now be allowed to open new international branches, US banking regulators said Monday. A Treasury Department agency found this month found the bank's board as early as 2005 had received "regular" reports that employee firings and internal ethics complaints were related to unethical sales practices. Monday's announcement reversed an action taken by the Federal Reserve Board and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, which in December jointly found that Wells Fargo had failed to remedy problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan.

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

By David Mardiste AMARI AIR BASE, Estonia (Reuters) - Two of the U.S. Air Force's newest and most advanced jets landed in the Baltic state of Estonia for the first time on Tuesday, a symbolic gesture meant to reinforce the United States' commitment to the defense of NATO allies that border Russia. The visit of the F-35 stealth fighters, which flew from Britain and spent several hours in Estonia, is part of broader U.S. jet pilot training across Europe as the NATO alliance seeks to deter Moscow from any possible incursion in the Baltics. "This is a very clear message," Estonia's Defense Minister Margus Tsahkna told Reuters.

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

The US State Department has been caught promoting Donald Trump’s Florida golf club Mar-a-Lago, in another apparent ethics violation by the administration. The US Embassy in London's website, which the department is responsible for, featured an article titled “Mar a Lago: Winter White House”. It said Mr Trump “is not the first president to have access to Mar-a-Lago as a Florida retreat, but he is the first one to use it”.

Tennessee teacher planned to take 15-year-old girl to Mexico

Tennessee teacher planned to take 15-year-old girl to Mexico

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A Tennessee teacher charged with kidnapping a 15-year-old student and driving her to California had planned to take the girl to Mexico and took a boat from San Diego on a test run, according to federal court documents filed Monday.

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

The stated objective of the Hezbollah-coordinated press tour of southern Lebanon was to see new Israeli defensive installations on the border – indications, according to the powerful Shiite Lebanese militia, of Israeli fears of Hezbollah’s growing military might. The unprecedented spectacle appeared to be a deliberate and calculated breach of a UN Security Council resolution that bans non-state forces from bearing arms in southern Lebanon, and it illustrated the unmatched sway Hezbollah wields, and the impunity it enjoys throughout the country. Recommended: Hezbollah 101: Who is the militant group, and what does it want?

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

After months of college application tasks and an anxious waiting period, high school seniors are starting to receive college acceptance letters. Many students may be relieved, but the hard work isn't necessarily over. Two current undergraduates recently shared their college decision strategies to help you prepare to pick a college before National College Decision Day on May 1.

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

French presidential frontrunner Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday rejected accusations he was resting on his laurels after winning the first round of the election, insisting "nothing's won yet" in the race against the far right's Marine Le Pen. The 39-year-old centrist said his victory in Sunday's first round of voting was proof that pollsters -- who had long placed him second to Le Pen in the opening round -- "get it wrong". "Nothing's won yet," Macron said during a visit to a hospital near Paris.

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

A new survey commissioned by Comcast has ranked apartment-dweller's need for good internet, relative to other niceties like basic hygiene. The conclusion seems to be that good Wi-Fi and high-speed internet are viewed as being the most critical. Comcast probably commissioned this survey to show how relevant its brand is to millennials or something, but the only actual truth to be found is this: Comcast knows that you will put up with basically anything to get good internet, so it's going to squeeze you for every last penny. The survey polled 2015 building managers and developers in the US about what features are the most important for prospective renters. A majority (59%) had either Wi-Fi access or fast internet as the most important feature, comfortably beating out a washer-dryer in unit as the must-have. This isn't so much a statement on the value of technology as it is a stunning indictment of broadband technology in the US. In a supposedly technology-literate, competitive, first-world country, access to the internet should be a given. But thanks to the oligopoly of cable companies that control access to the internet with very little regional competition, you're often left with little or no choice of cable providers. That means that if Verizon or Comcast only choose to supply your building with a 10Mbps, you're out of luck. So really, this survey just confirms to Comcast an important fact about its customers: it doesn't matter how bad the customer service is or if it flat-out calls its customers idiots: you don't have any choice and you need internet, so pucker up, lucky consumers.

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

By Dan Levine SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A U.S. judge on Tuesday blocked President Donald Trump's executive order that sought to withhold federal funds from so-called sanctuary cities, dealing another legal blow to the administration's efforts to toughen immigration enforcement. The ruling from U.S. District Judge William Orrick III in San Francisco said Trump's Jan. 25 order targeted broad categories of federal funding for sanctuary governments and that plaintiffs challenging the order were likely to succeed in proving it unconstitutional.

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

MIAMI (AP) — A former Haitian coup leader and recently elected senator in that country pleaded guilty Monday to a U.S. drug money-laundering charge under a deal that should allow him to avoid a potential sentence of life in prison for cocaine trafficking.

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish warplanes struck suspected Kurdish rebel positions in Iraq and Syria on Tuesday, drawing condemnation from Baghdad and criticism from the U.S.-led coalition fighting the Islamic State group, which is allied with Kurdish factions in both countries.

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

Global warming has pushed the Arctic into a new state unprecedented in human history, with thinning and retreating sea ice, skyrocketing air and sea temperatures, melting permafrost, and glaciers that are shedding ice at increasing rates.  All of these impacts and more may seem remote at first — after all, few of us live in Nunavut — but if you're a coastal resident anywhere in the world, from New York City to Dhaka, Bangladesh, what happens in the Arctic will affect you during the next several decades and beyond, primarily through sea level rise.  SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming The economic effects of all Arctic warming impacts may be enough to dent the gross domestic product of some countries, with cost estimates ranging from $7 trillion to $90 trillion by the end of this century. These are the conclusions of a new, comprehensive assessment of the Arctic climate by a division of the Arctic Council — a cooperative, governing body that helps oversee development in the Far North.  Sea ice (TOP) meets land as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft above Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesThe scientific report, released on Tuesday, is known as Snow, Water, Ice, and Permafrost in the Arctic, or SWIPA. About 90 scientists helped produce the report, while more than two-dozen experts peer-reviewed the results.  The document contains two key findings that anyone concerned about the future of not just the Arctic, but the entire globe, should take note of.  The first is that the Arctic Ocean could be free of summer sea ice starting as early as the late 2030s, which is earlier than other estimates have shown. The second is that rapid Arctic warming is driving greater melting of land ice in the region, which led scientists to conclude that consensus projections of global sea level rise made in 2013 are too conservative. Compared to the previous SWIPA report, which was produced in 2011, the new assessment paints a far more dire picture of an Arctic climate in overdrive.  It also offers hope that action can be taken now to slow down and eventually stabilize Arctic warming after about the year 2050. But time is running out. Even with rapid action to curb global warming pollutants like carbon dioxide and methane, the Arctic most of us grew up with — featuring thick sea ice making the region virtually impenetrable year-round — is gone, and is not likely to return anytime in the next century.  Sea ice thickness trends, showing the thinning trend in recent years.Image: zack labe"... The Arctic of today is different in many respects from the Arctic of the past century, or even the Arctic of 20 years ago," the report states. "Many of the changes underway are due to a simple fact: Ice, snow, and frozen ground — the components of the Arctic cryosphere — are sensitive to heat."  Based on computer model projections, the report states that average fall and winter temperatures in the Arctic will increase up to 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, above late 20th century values by the middle of the century, even if relatively stringent greenhouse gas emissions cuts are made.  Such temperature thresholds are already being reached in some months, with January 2016 recording a temperature anomaly of 9 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981-2010 average for the region, with even higher anomalies seen during October through February of the same year.  This past winter was the warmest on record for the Arctic, and for the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter. This has left sea ice in a precariously thin and sparse state as the upcoming melt season nears.  The report contains valuable findings on what would happen to Arctic climate change if the world were to come close to meeting the goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement. That treaty, which went into force in November 2016, aims to keep global warming to well under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through the year 2100.  It's unclear whether the agreement's goals are still feasible, considering that the U.S. — the world's second-largest emitter — is considering pulling out of it altogether, and other nations have yet to offer plans to cut their emissions in line with the temperature target.  A "drunken forest" in Fairbanks Alaska where trees are collapsing into the ground due to permafrost melt.Image: Warming Images/REX/ShutterstockMeeting the Paris targets would help slow the pace and reduce the severity of Arctic warming, but it "would not stabilize the loss of Arctic glaciers, ice sheets, and ice caps," the report states.  "The recent SWIPA assessment tells that the changes in the Arctic are bound to continue at the current rate until mid-century," said Morten Skovgaard Olsen, who chaired the new report, in an email.  "But it also tells that immediate and ambitious green-house gas reductions will slow the speed of changes beyond mid-century and even stabilize change beyond mid century, preventing major further impacts associated with the Arctic melt .” Any carbon pollution cuts made now will have the most significant influence on what the Arctic will look like after about 2050, the report's authors said at a press conference Tuesday in Virginia.  “The changes are cumulative, and so what we do in the next 5 years is really important on slowing down the changes that will happen in the next 30 or 40 years," said James Overland, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  "The emphasis on action and immediacy is one of the main findings” from the report, he said.  NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice near Pituffik, Greenland.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesForeign ministers from the eight Arctic nations will meet in Fairbanks, Alaska on May 11 to discuss these findings and other issues pertaining to the region. Some discussion on the Paris agreement may take place, particularly along the sidelines of the talks. According to the SWIPA report, meltwater from Arctic glaciers has contributed 35 percent of current sea level rise, with the greatest contribution coming from Greenland.  The planet's largest island lost an average of 375 gigatons of ice per year. This is equivalent to losing a block of ice measuring 4.6 miles on all sides, from 2011 to 2014 alone. It amounts to twice the melt rate from 2003 to 2008. In addition, thawing permafrost is harming infrastructure from Alaska to Siberia, with landslides and mysterious craters swallowing parts of the Russian Arctic.  In Alaska, the report found that wildfires in taiga forests are worse now than at any time in the past 10,000 years, due to hotter, drier summers and earlier spring snowmelt. WATCH: Stunning drone footage captures rare video of blue whales feeding

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

The US Supreme Court on Monday turned back an appeal by rights groups seeking to make public a damning report on the CIA's post-September 11 torture program, ensuring it will remain secret. The court rebuffed arguments from the American Civil Liberties Union that the highly classified report, compiled in 2014 by the Senate Intelligence Committee, should be released based on US government transparency rules. "We are disappointed by this major setback for government transparency and accountability.

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

By Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United States slammed South Sudan's President Salva Kiir on Tuesday for the African state's "man-made" famine and ongoing conflict, urging him to fulfill a month-old pledge of a unilateral truce by ordering his troops back to their barracks. "We must see a sign that progress is possible," U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley told a United Nations Security Council briefing on South Sudan. "We must see that ceasefire implemented." South Sudan descended into civil war in 2013 after Kiir fired his deputy, unleashing a conflict that has spawned armed factions often following ethnic lines.

20 Ways To Save Money

20 Ways To Save Money

Some are tougher to achieve than others, and you'll need to weigh the necessary sacrifice against the return.

Behold: This Galaxy Note 8 blows the Galaxy S8 out of the water

Behold: This Galaxy Note 8 blows the Galaxy S8 out of the water

Samsung's Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ were finally released this past Friday, and it seems like the phones are already well on their way to becoming a smash hit. The South Korean electronics giant announced Monday morning that combined Galaxy S8 and S8+ pre-orders out-sold Samsung's previous-generation Galaxy S7 and S7 edge by 30%. As a quick reminder, the S7 and S7 edge were Samsung's best-selling phones ever. If you picked up a new Galaxy S8 on Friday or over the weekend, rest assured that you now hold the most stunning smartphones that have ever existed. They're also two of the most powerful smartphones that have ever existed. In fact, there's almost nothing on Earth that could possibly give you buyer's remorse. Almost nothing... When an early adopter buys a new flagship iPhone, he or she knows that there will be a full year to wait (and save up money) before an even better new flagship iPhone launches. In Samsung's case, however, there's a much shorter buffer in between flagship releases. In the first half of each year, Samsung updates its Galaxy S lineup. The Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ are the company's flagship smartphones for the first half of 2017 and as you read in our Galaxy S8 review, they're incredible. Then, in the second half of 2017, Samsung will update its Note line with the all-new Galaxy Note 8. If the Note 8 looks anything like this, Galaxy S8 and S8+ owners should prepare to be very, very jealous. Graphic designer Muhsin M. Belaal Auckburaully teamed up with YouTube channel DBS Designing to completely reimagine Samsung's Galaxy Note series using design cues from the Galaxy S8 along with rumors we've heard so far. The results, as you can see, are absolutely stunning. Unlike most concept smartphones we see out there, this Galaxy Note 8 is actually rooted in reality. It likely doesn't look exactly like the Note 8 Samsung will release later this year, but we're willing to bet that it's close. Hopefully Samsung sticks with the precedent set by the Galaxy S8, however, and ditches that distracting logo from the front of the phone. As for specs, Auckburaully stays well within the realm of reality by sticking with the rumors we've heard so far. The Note 8 should feature a huge 6.4-inch QHD+ display and a screen-to-body ratio that's even better than the 83% ratio on the Galaxy S8. Other expected specs include 6GB of RAM, 64GB or 128GB of storage, microSDXC support, a new dual-lens rear camera setup, an iris scanner, and a huge 4,000 mAh battery that hopefully doesn't explode. More images of Auckburaully's Galaxy Note 8 design can be seen on his Behance page, and a video featuring the design is embedded below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0p3CAs9ZP0

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

Less than two years after officially launching its Pony Car beyond its domestic US borders, the Ford Mustang is the world's best-selling sportscar. In all, Ford sold 150,000 Mustangs around the world in 2016 which, according to the latest industry data from IHS Markit, means the car is not only America's most popular sportscar, it has now conquered the world, too, despite some hard-hitting European and Japanese competition. The Mustang has outsold the Mazda MX-5 Miata, BMW 4 Series, Nissan 370Z and the venerable Porsche 911 among others to claim the top spot, leaving many to ponder why it took Ford so long -- 51 years -- to finally offer its most famous muscle car to European and Asian customers.

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

SAO PAULO (AP) — Twelve men suspected of taking part in a dramatic, multimillion-dollar theft from an armored car company in a Paraguayan border city have been arrested in Brazil, officials in the Brazilian Federal Police said Tuesday.

Iran nuclear deal under review as uncertainty grows

Iran nuclear deal under review as uncertainty grows

Iran and major powers met Tuesday in Vienna to review adherence to their 2015 nuclear deal as uncertainty grows about the landmark accord's future under US President Donald Trump. The regular quarterly meeting heard, as Washington confirmed last week, that Iran is sticking to its side of the deal with the United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany, diplomats said. The accord saw Tehran drastically curb its nuclear activities in order to ease concerns that Iran wanted to build an atomic bomb.

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

Reports of American workers being short on their retirement funds are rampant. The National Institute on Retirement Security frames the "underfunded" issue in real dollar terms, noting that retirement savings are "dangerously low", and the U.S. retirement savings deficit is between $6.8 and $14 trillion. Yes, too many Americans are underfunded in the retirement accounts -- but how do you know exactly how much you're underfunded?

Scots don't want another independence vote: Kantar poll

Scots don't want another independence vote: Kantar poll

Most Scottish voters do not want another referendum on independence from the United Kingdom and support for secession itself appears to have weakened, according to a Kantar survey. Scots voted by a wide margin to stick with the European Union in last June's referendum, clashing with the UK as a whole which voted to leave. Scotland's devolved government, run by the Scottish National Party (SNP), says this means the country should be given a new chance to decide whether it wants to split from the UK.

wireless

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

President Trump lost his first fight over health care and Monday night he appeared to back off threats to force Democrats and Republicans to pay for the border wall. Fmr. GOP Congressman David Jolly and MNSBC's Joy Reid join Lawrence O'Donnell.

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Two conservative groups filed a lawsuit against the University of California at Berkeley claiming that a decision to cancel an appearance by the firebrand pundit Ann Coulter violated their right to free speech. The Berkeley College Republicans and Young America's Foundation, which had invited Coulter to speak on April 27, accused the university of seeking to silence conservative viewpoints and stifle political discourse at the famously progressive campus by imposing unreasonable demands on campus events involving certain "high-profile" speakers. "Defendants' discriminatory imposition of curfew and venue restrictions has resulted in the cancellation of two speaking engagements featuring prominent conservative speakers in the month of April, 2017," read the lawsuit filed in federal court in San Francisco.

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

The United States on Tuesday expressed "deep concern" over Turkish air strikes against Kurdish fighters in Syria and Iraq and said they were not authorized by the U.S.-led coalition fighting Islamic State. The raids in Iraq's Sinjar region and northeast Syria killed at least 20 in a campaign against groups linked to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), which has waged a three-decade insurgency against Turkey for Kurdish autonomy. Turkey is part of the U.S.-led military coalition fighting militants in Syria.

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Gov. Asa Hutchinson issued an order in February to execute eight men in 10 days in April because the state's stock of midazolam, a key lethal injection drug, expires at the end of the month.

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Several mummies and more than 1,000 figurines have been discovered at an ancient cemetery located at Luxor in Egypt, archaeologists reported. A team of archaeologists with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities uncovered the funerary complex during the ministry's ongoing excavations at the site. The funerary complex contains multiple tombs that were originally built for a man named Userhat, who was a judge in Luxor sometime during what modern-day archaeologists call Egypt's New Kingdom (1550–1070 B.C.) period, the ministry said in a statement.

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

Retail banking giant Wells Fargo has fixed problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan and will now be allowed to open new international branches, US banking regulators said Monday. A Treasury Department agency found this month found the bank's board as early as 2005 had received "regular" reports that employee firings and internal ethics complaints were related to unethical sales practices. Monday's announcement reversed an action taken by the Federal Reserve Board and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, which in December jointly found that Wells Fargo had failed to remedy problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan.

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

By David Mardiste AMARI AIR BASE, Estonia (Reuters) - Two of the U.S. Air Force's newest and most advanced jets landed in the Baltic state of Estonia for the first time on Tuesday, a symbolic gesture meant to reinforce the United States' commitment to the defense of NATO allies that border Russia. The visit of the F-35 stealth fighters, which flew from Britain and spent several hours in Estonia, is part of broader U.S. jet pilot training across Europe as the NATO alliance seeks to deter Moscow from any possible incursion in the Baltics. "This is a very clear message," Estonia's Defense Minister Margus Tsahkna told Reuters.

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

The US State Department has been caught promoting Donald Trump’s Florida golf club Mar-a-Lago, in another apparent ethics violation by the administration. The US Embassy in London's website, which the department is responsible for, featured an article titled “Mar a Lago: Winter White House”. It said Mr Trump “is not the first president to have access to Mar-a-Lago as a Florida retreat, but he is the first one to use it”.

Tennessee teacher planned to take 15-year-old girl to Mexico

Tennessee teacher planned to take 15-year-old girl to Mexico

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A Tennessee teacher charged with kidnapping a 15-year-old student and driving her to California had planned to take the girl to Mexico and took a boat from San Diego on a test run, according to federal court documents filed Monday.

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

The stated objective of the Hezbollah-coordinated press tour of southern Lebanon was to see new Israeli defensive installations on the border – indications, according to the powerful Shiite Lebanese militia, of Israeli fears of Hezbollah’s growing military might. The unprecedented spectacle appeared to be a deliberate and calculated breach of a UN Security Council resolution that bans non-state forces from bearing arms in southern Lebanon, and it illustrated the unmatched sway Hezbollah wields, and the impunity it enjoys throughout the country. Recommended: Hezbollah 101: Who is the militant group, and what does it want?

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

After months of college application tasks and an anxious waiting period, high school seniors are starting to receive college acceptance letters. Many students may be relieved, but the hard work isn't necessarily over. Two current undergraduates recently shared their college decision strategies to help you prepare to pick a college before National College Decision Day on May 1.

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

French presidential frontrunner Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday rejected accusations he was resting on his laurels after winning the first round of the election, insisting "nothing's won yet" in the race against the far right's Marine Le Pen. The 39-year-old centrist said his victory in Sunday's first round of voting was proof that pollsters -- who had long placed him second to Le Pen in the opening round -- "get it wrong". "Nothing's won yet," Macron said during a visit to a hospital near Paris.

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

A new survey commissioned by Comcast has ranked apartment-dweller's need for good internet, relative to other niceties like basic hygiene. The conclusion seems to be that good Wi-Fi and high-speed internet are viewed as being the most critical. Comcast probably commissioned this survey to show how relevant its brand is to millennials or something, but the only actual truth to be found is this: Comcast knows that you will put up with basically anything to get good internet, so it's going to squeeze you for every last penny. The survey polled 2015 building managers and developers in the US about what features are the most important for prospective renters. A majority (59%) had either Wi-Fi access or fast internet as the most important feature, comfortably beating out a washer-dryer in unit as the must-have. This isn't so much a statement on the value of technology as it is a stunning indictment of broadband technology in the US. In a supposedly technology-literate, competitive, first-world country, access to the internet should be a given. But thanks to the oligopoly of cable companies that control access to the internet with very little regional competition, you're often left with little or no choice of cable providers. That means that if Verizon or Comcast only choose to supply your building with a 10Mbps, you're out of luck. So really, this survey just confirms to Comcast an important fact about its customers: it doesn't matter how bad the customer service is or if it flat-out calls its customers idiots: you don't have any choice and you need internet, so pucker up, lucky consumers.

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

By Dan Levine SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A U.S. judge on Tuesday blocked President Donald Trump's executive order that sought to withhold federal funds from so-called sanctuary cities, dealing another legal blow to the administration's efforts to toughen immigration enforcement. The ruling from U.S. District Judge William Orrick III in San Francisco said Trump's Jan. 25 order targeted broad categories of federal funding for sanctuary governments and that plaintiffs challenging the order were likely to succeed in proving it unconstitutional.

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

MIAMI (AP) — A former Haitian coup leader and recently elected senator in that country pleaded guilty Monday to a U.S. drug money-laundering charge under a deal that should allow him to avoid a potential sentence of life in prison for cocaine trafficking.

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish warplanes struck suspected Kurdish rebel positions in Iraq and Syria on Tuesday, drawing condemnation from Baghdad and criticism from the U.S.-led coalition fighting the Islamic State group, which is allied with Kurdish factions in both countries.

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

Global warming has pushed the Arctic into a new state unprecedented in human history, with thinning and retreating sea ice, skyrocketing air and sea temperatures, melting permafrost, and glaciers that are shedding ice at increasing rates.  All of these impacts and more may seem remote at first — after all, few of us live in Nunavut — but if you're a coastal resident anywhere in the world, from New York City to Dhaka, Bangladesh, what happens in the Arctic will affect you during the next several decades and beyond, primarily through sea level rise.  SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming The economic effects of all Arctic warming impacts may be enough to dent the gross domestic product of some countries, with cost estimates ranging from $7 trillion to $90 trillion by the end of this century. These are the conclusions of a new, comprehensive assessment of the Arctic climate by a division of the Arctic Council — a cooperative, governing body that helps oversee development in the Far North.  Sea ice (TOP) meets land as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft above Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesThe scientific report, released on Tuesday, is known as Snow, Water, Ice, and Permafrost in the Arctic, or SWIPA. About 90 scientists helped produce the report, while more than two-dozen experts peer-reviewed the results.  The document contains two key findings that anyone concerned about the future of not just the Arctic, but the entire globe, should take note of.  The first is that the Arctic Ocean could be free of summer sea ice starting as early as the late 2030s, which is earlier than other estimates have shown. The second is that rapid Arctic warming is driving greater melting of land ice in the region, which led scientists to conclude that consensus projections of global sea level rise made in 2013 are too conservative. Compared to the previous SWIPA report, which was produced in 2011, the new assessment paints a far more dire picture of an Arctic climate in overdrive.  It also offers hope that action can be taken now to slow down and eventually stabilize Arctic warming after about the year 2050. But time is running out. Even with rapid action to curb global warming pollutants like carbon dioxide and methane, the Arctic most of us grew up with — featuring thick sea ice making the region virtually impenetrable year-round — is gone, and is not likely to return anytime in the next century.  Sea ice thickness trends, showing the thinning trend in recent years.Image: zack labe"... The Arctic of today is different in many respects from the Arctic of the past century, or even the Arctic of 20 years ago," the report states. "Many of the changes underway are due to a simple fact: Ice, snow, and frozen ground — the components of the Arctic cryosphere — are sensitive to heat."  Based on computer model projections, the report states that average fall and winter temperatures in the Arctic will increase up to 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, above late 20th century values by the middle of the century, even if relatively stringent greenhouse gas emissions cuts are made.  Such temperature thresholds are already being reached in some months, with January 2016 recording a temperature anomaly of 9 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981-2010 average for the region, with even higher anomalies seen during October through February of the same year.  This past winter was the warmest on record for the Arctic, and for the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter. This has left sea ice in a precariously thin and sparse state as the upcoming melt season nears.  The report contains valuable findings on what would happen to Arctic climate change if the world were to come close to meeting the goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement. That treaty, which went into force in November 2016, aims to keep global warming to well under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through the year 2100.  It's unclear whether the agreement's goals are still feasible, considering that the U.S. — the world's second-largest emitter — is considering pulling out of it altogether, and other nations have yet to offer plans to cut their emissions in line with the temperature target.  A "drunken forest" in Fairbanks Alaska where trees are collapsing into the ground due to permafrost melt.Image: Warming Images/REX/ShutterstockMeeting the Paris targets would help slow the pace and reduce the severity of Arctic warming, but it "would not stabilize the loss of Arctic glaciers, ice sheets, and ice caps," the report states.  "The recent SWIPA assessment tells that the changes in the Arctic are bound to continue at the current rate until mid-century," said Morten Skovgaard Olsen, who chaired the new report, in an email.  "But it also tells that immediate and ambitious green-house gas reductions will slow the speed of changes beyond mid-century and even stabilize change beyond mid century, preventing major further impacts associated with the Arctic melt .” Any carbon pollution cuts made now will have the most significant influence on what the Arctic will look like after about 2050, the report's authors said at a press conference Tuesday in Virginia.  “The changes are cumulative, and so what we do in the next 5 years is really important on slowing down the changes that will happen in the next 30 or 40 years," said James Overland, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  "The emphasis on action and immediacy is one of the main findings” from the report, he said.  NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice near Pituffik, Greenland.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesForeign ministers from the eight Arctic nations will meet in Fairbanks, Alaska on May 11 to discuss these findings and other issues pertaining to the region. Some discussion on the Paris agreement may take place, particularly along the sidelines of the talks. According to the SWIPA report, meltwater from Arctic glaciers has contributed 35 percent of current sea level rise, with the greatest contribution coming from Greenland.  The planet's largest island lost an average of 375 gigatons of ice per year. This is equivalent to losing a block of ice measuring 4.6 miles on all sides, from 2011 to 2014 alone. It amounts to twice the melt rate from 2003 to 2008. In addition, thawing permafrost is harming infrastructure from Alaska to Siberia, with landslides and mysterious craters swallowing parts of the Russian Arctic.  In Alaska, the report found that wildfires in taiga forests are worse now than at any time in the past 10,000 years, due to hotter, drier summers and earlier spring snowmelt. WATCH: Stunning drone footage captures rare video of blue whales feeding

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

The US Supreme Court on Monday turned back an appeal by rights groups seeking to make public a damning report on the CIA's post-September 11 torture program, ensuring it will remain secret. The court rebuffed arguments from the American Civil Liberties Union that the highly classified report, compiled in 2014 by the Senate Intelligence Committee, should be released based on US government transparency rules. "We are disappointed by this major setback for government transparency and accountability.

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

By Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United States slammed South Sudan's President Salva Kiir on Tuesday for the African state's "man-made" famine and ongoing conflict, urging him to fulfill a month-old pledge of a unilateral truce by ordering his troops back to their barracks. "We must see a sign that progress is possible," U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley told a United Nations Security Council briefing on South Sudan. "We must see that ceasefire implemented." South Sudan descended into civil war in 2013 after Kiir fired his deputy, unleashing a conflict that has spawned armed factions often following ethnic lines.

20 Ways To Save Money

20 Ways To Save Money

Some are tougher to achieve than others, and you'll need to weigh the necessary sacrifice against the return.

Behold: This Galaxy Note 8 blows the Galaxy S8 out of the water

Behold: This Galaxy Note 8 blows the Galaxy S8 out of the water

Samsung's Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ were finally released this past Friday, and it seems like the phones are already well on their way to becoming a smash hit. The South Korean electronics giant announced Monday morning that combined Galaxy S8 and S8+ pre-orders out-sold Samsung's previous-generation Galaxy S7 and S7 edge by 30%. As a quick reminder, the S7 and S7 edge were Samsung's best-selling phones ever. If you picked up a new Galaxy S8 on Friday or over the weekend, rest assured that you now hold the most stunning smartphones that have ever existed. They're also two of the most powerful smartphones that have ever existed. In fact, there's almost nothing on Earth that could possibly give you buyer's remorse. Almost nothing... When an early adopter buys a new flagship iPhone, he or she knows that there will be a full year to wait (and save up money) before an even better new flagship iPhone launches. In Samsung's case, however, there's a much shorter buffer in between flagship releases. In the first half of each year, Samsung updates its Galaxy S lineup. The Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ are the company's flagship smartphones for the first half of 2017 and as you read in our Galaxy S8 review, they're incredible. Then, in the second half of 2017, Samsung will update its Note line with the all-new Galaxy Note 8. If the Note 8 looks anything like this, Galaxy S8 and S8+ owners should prepare to be very, very jealous. Graphic designer Muhsin M. Belaal Auckburaully teamed up with YouTube channel DBS Designing to completely reimagine Samsung's Galaxy Note series using design cues from the Galaxy S8 along with rumors we've heard so far. The results, as you can see, are absolutely stunning. Unlike most concept smartphones we see out there, this Galaxy Note 8 is actually rooted in reality. It likely doesn't look exactly like the Note 8 Samsung will release later this year, but we're willing to bet that it's close. Hopefully Samsung sticks with the precedent set by the Galaxy S8, however, and ditches that distracting logo from the front of the phone. As for specs, Auckburaully stays well within the realm of reality by sticking with the rumors we've heard so far. The Note 8 should feature a huge 6.4-inch QHD+ display and a screen-to-body ratio that's even better than the 83% ratio on the Galaxy S8. Other expected specs include 6GB of RAM, 64GB or 128GB of storage, microSDXC support, a new dual-lens rear camera setup, an iris scanner, and a huge 4,000 mAh battery that hopefully doesn't explode. More images of Auckburaully's Galaxy Note 8 design can be seen on his Behance page, and a video featuring the design is embedded below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0p3CAs9ZP0

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

Less than two years after officially launching its Pony Car beyond its domestic US borders, the Ford Mustang is the world's best-selling sportscar. In all, Ford sold 150,000 Mustangs around the world in 2016 which, according to the latest industry data from IHS Markit, means the car is not only America's most popular sportscar, it has now conquered the world, too, despite some hard-hitting European and Japanese competition. The Mustang has outsold the Mazda MX-5 Miata, BMW 4 Series, Nissan 370Z and the venerable Porsche 911 among others to claim the top spot, leaving many to ponder why it took Ford so long -- 51 years -- to finally offer its most famous muscle car to European and Asian customers.

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

SAO PAULO (AP) — Twelve men suspected of taking part in a dramatic, multimillion-dollar theft from an armored car company in a Paraguayan border city have been arrested in Brazil, officials in the Brazilian Federal Police said Tuesday.

Iran nuclear deal under review as uncertainty grows

Iran nuclear deal under review as uncertainty grows

Iran and major powers met Tuesday in Vienna to review adherence to their 2015 nuclear deal as uncertainty grows about the landmark accord's future under US President Donald Trump. The regular quarterly meeting heard, as Washington confirmed last week, that Iran is sticking to its side of the deal with the United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany, diplomats said. The accord saw Tehran drastically curb its nuclear activities in order to ease concerns that Iran wanted to build an atomic bomb.

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

Reports of American workers being short on their retirement funds are rampant. The National Institute on Retirement Security frames the "underfunded" issue in real dollar terms, noting that retirement savings are "dangerously low", and the U.S. retirement savings deficit is between $6.8 and $14 trillion. Yes, too many Americans are underfunded in the retirement accounts -- but how do you know exactly how much you're underfunded?

Scots don't want another independence vote: Kantar poll

Scots don't want another independence vote: Kantar poll

Most Scottish voters do not want another referendum on independence from the United Kingdom and support for secession itself appears to have weakened, according to a Kantar survey. Scots voted by a wide margin to stick with the European Union in last June's referendum, clashing with the UK as a whole which voted to leave. Scotland's devolved government, run by the Scottish National Party (SNP), says this means the country should be given a new chance to decide whether it wants to split from the UK.

apple-macintosh

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

President Trump lost his first fight over health care and Monday night he appeared to back off threats to force Democrats and Republicans to pay for the border wall. Fmr. GOP Congressman David Jolly and MNSBC's Joy Reid join Lawrence O'Donnell.

Dragged United passenger 'aggressive', officers say

Dragged United passenger 'aggressive', officers say

Newly released reports from security officers at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport paint an unflattering picture of the man dragged from a United Airlines flight, setting off a worldwide uproar. The documents, requested by US media outlets which reported on their contents Tuesday, say passenger David Dao was "aggressive," and that one of the three officers attempting to remove him from his seat on United Flight 3411 had lost his grip when Dao flailed his arms, causing the 69-year-old to fall and injure himself. The reports also for the first time identified the three Chicago Department of Aviation officers on the plane, one of whom wrote that they had used "minimal but necessary force" to remove Dao from the packed flight to Louisville, Kentucky.

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

By Dan Levine SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A U.S. judge on Tuesday blocked President Donald Trump's executive order that sought to withhold federal funds from so-called sanctuary cities, dealing another legal blow to the administration's efforts to toughen immigration enforcement. The ruling from U.S. District Judge William Orrick III in San Francisco said Trump's Jan. 25 order targeted broad categories of federal funding for sanctuary governments and that plaintiffs challenging the order were likely to succeed in proving it unconstitutional.

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Two conservative groups filed a lawsuit against the University of California at Berkeley claiming that a decision to cancel an appearance by the firebrand pundit Ann Coulter violated their right to free speech. The Berkeley College Republicans and Young America's Foundation, which had invited Coulter to speak on April 27, accused the university of seeking to silence conservative viewpoints and stifle political discourse at the famously progressive campus by imposing unreasonable demands on campus events involving certain "high-profile" speakers. "Defendants' discriminatory imposition of curfew and venue restrictions has resulted in the cancellation of two speaking engagements featuring prominent conservative speakers in the month of April, 2017," read the lawsuit filed in federal court in San Francisco.

North Korea stages large-scale artillery drill as U.S. submarine docks in South

North Korea stages large-scale artillery drill as U.S. submarine docks in South

By Ju-min Park SEOUL (Reuters) - North Korea conducted a big live-fire exercise on Tuesday to mark the foundation of its military as a U.S. submarine docked in South Korea in a show of force amid growing concern over the North's nuclear and missile programs. The port call by the USS Michigan came as a U.S. aircraft carrier strike group steamed toward Korean waters and as top envoys for North Korea policy from South Korea, Japan and the United States met in Tokyo.

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

The stated objective of the Hezbollah-coordinated press tour of southern Lebanon was to see new Israeli defensive installations on the border – indications, according to the powerful Shiite Lebanese militia, of Israeli fears of Hezbollah’s growing military might. The unprecedented spectacle appeared to be a deliberate and calculated breach of a UN Security Council resolution that bans non-state forces from bearing arms in southern Lebanon, and it illustrated the unmatched sway Hezbollah wields, and the impunity it enjoys throughout the country. Recommended: Hezbollah 101: Who is the militant group, and what does it want?

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

Retail banking giant Wells Fargo has fixed problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan and will now be allowed to open new international branches, US banking regulators said Monday. A Treasury Department agency found this month found the bank's board as early as 2005 had received "regular" reports that employee firings and internal ethics complaints were related to unethical sales practices. Monday's announcement reversed an action taken by the Federal Reserve Board and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, which in December jointly found that Wells Fargo had failed to remedy problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan.

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

By David Mardiste AMARI AIR BASE, Estonia (Reuters) - Two of the U.S. Air Force's newest and most advanced jets landed in the Baltic state of Estonia for the first time on Tuesday, a symbolic gesture meant to reinforce the United States' commitment to the defense of NATO allies that border Russia. The visit of the F-35 stealth fighters, which flew from Britain and spent several hours in Estonia, is part of broader U.S. jet pilot training across Europe as the NATO alliance seeks to deter Moscow from any possible incursion in the Baltics. "This is a very clear message," Estonia's Defense Minister Margus Tsahkna told Reuters.

World powers round on Donald Trump at UN over climate change

World powers round on Donald Trump at UN over climate change

China, the UK, the European Union and Brazil have all filed questions at the United Nations about the United States’ policies on climate change amid international concern that Donald Trump will withdraw the US from the historic Paris Agreement. While the Trump administration’s plans remain unclear, there have been suggestions the US could face trade tariffs if its greenhouse gas emissions are allowed to increase while the rest of the world makes substantial cuts.

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Several mummies and more than 1,000 figurines have been discovered at an ancient cemetery located at Luxor in Egypt, archaeologists reported. A team of archaeologists with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities uncovered the funerary complex during the ministry's ongoing excavations at the site. The funerary complex contains multiple tombs that were originally built for a man named Userhat, who was a judge in Luxor sometime during what modern-day archaeologists call Egypt's New Kingdom (1550–1070 B.C.) period, the ministry said in a statement.

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

After months of college application tasks and an anxious waiting period, high school seniors are starting to receive college acceptance letters. Many students may be relieved, but the hard work isn't necessarily over. Two current undergraduates recently shared their college decision strategies to help you prepare to pick a college before National College Decision Day on May 1.

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

A new survey commissioned by Comcast has ranked apartment-dweller's need for good internet, relative to other niceties like basic hygiene. The conclusion seems to be that good Wi-Fi and high-speed internet are viewed as being the most critical. Comcast probably commissioned this survey to show how relevant its brand is to millennials or something, but the only actual truth to be found is this: Comcast knows that you will put up with basically anything to get good internet, so it's going to squeeze you for every last penny. The survey polled 2015 building managers and developers in the US about what features are the most important for prospective renters. A majority (59%) had either Wi-Fi access or fast internet as the most important feature, comfortably beating out a washer-dryer in unit as the must-have. This isn't so much a statement on the value of technology as it is a stunning indictment of broadband technology in the US. In a supposedly technology-literate, competitive, first-world country, access to the internet should be a given. But thanks to the oligopoly of cable companies that control access to the internet with very little regional competition, you're often left with little or no choice of cable providers. That means that if Verizon or Comcast only choose to supply your building with a 10Mbps, you're out of luck. So really, this survey just confirms to Comcast an important fact about its customers: it doesn't matter how bad the customer service is or if it flat-out calls its customers idiots: you don't have any choice and you need internet, so pucker up, lucky consumers.

Erdogan says Turkey won't wait at Europe's door forever

Erdogan says Turkey won't wait at Europe's door forever

By Samia Nakhoul, Nick Tattersall and Orhan Coskun ANKARA (Reuters) - Turkey will not wait at Europe's door forever and is ready to walk away from EU accession talks if rising Islamophobia and hostility from some member states persist, President Tayyip Erdogan told Reuters in a wide-ranging interview on Tuesday. Speaking at the presidential palace less than two weeks after winning sweeping new powers in a referendum, a relaxed Erdogan said a decision by a leading European human rights body to put Turkey back on a watch list was "entirely political" and that Ankara did not recognize the move. The Strasbourg-based Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe said it put Turkey back on review over its crackdown on dissent since last year's coup attempt, rights violations, and concerns about Erdogan's increased grip on power.

The Very Hungry Caterpillar joins fight against plastic pollution

The Very Hungry Caterpillar joins fight against plastic pollution

A moth caterpillar commonly bred to provide fish bait feasts on a notoriously resistant plastic, scientists reported Monday, raising hopes the creature can help manage the global problem of plastic-bag pollution. "This discovery could be an important tool for helping to get rid of the polyethylene plastic waste accumulated in landfill sites and oceans," said Cambridge University professor Paolo Bombelli, co-author of a study published in the journal Current Biology. Polyethylene represents 40 percent of Europe's demand for plastic products, mostly in the form of packaging and shopping bags.

US Navy fires warning flare at Iran vessel in Persian Gulf

US Navy fires warning flare at Iran vessel in Persian Gulf

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — A U.S. Navy guided-missile destroyer fired a warning flare toward an Iranian Revolutionary Guard vessel coming near it in the Persian Gulf, an American official said on Wednesday, the latest tense naval encounter between the two countries.

20 Ways To Save Money

20 Ways To Save Money

Some are tougher to achieve than others, and you'll need to weigh the necessary sacrifice against the return.

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

Less than two years after officially launching its Pony Car beyond its domestic US borders, the Ford Mustang is the world's best-selling sportscar. In all, Ford sold 150,000 Mustangs around the world in 2016 which, according to the latest industry data from IHS Markit, means the car is not only America's most popular sportscar, it has now conquered the world, too, despite some hard-hitting European and Japanese competition. The Mustang has outsold the Mazda MX-5 Miata, BMW 4 Series, Nissan 370Z and the venerable Porsche 911 among others to claim the top spot, leaving many to ponder why it took Ford so long -- 51 years -- to finally offer its most famous muscle car to European and Asian customers.

Iraqi forces using siege and stealth to evict Islamic State from Mosul

Iraqi forces using siege and stealth to evict Islamic State from Mosul

By Ahmed Aboulenein MOSUL, Iraq, (Reuters) - Iraqi forces are using siege and stealth tactics to drive Islamic State militants out of Mosul's Old City, an Iraqi general said, as his forces sought to minimize casualties among hundreds of thousands of people trapped in the cramped, historic neighborhood. Explosions from two car bombs could be heard nearby as Lieutenant General Abdul Ghani al-Assadi spoke to Reuters at his command post on Monday, and a Reuters correspondent saw thick smoke rising from the blasts. "Most houses in the Old City are very old and its streets and alleyways are very narrow," said Assadi, a commander of Iraqi counter-terrorism units in Mosul.

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

MIAMI (AP) — A former Haitian coup leader and recently elected senator in that country pleaded guilty Monday to a U.S. drug money-laundering charge under a deal that should allow him to avoid a potential sentence of life in prison for cocaine trafficking.

Barack Obama to 'make $400k' for his Wall Street speech

Barack Obama to 'make $400k' for his Wall Street speech

Barack Obama has reportedly agreed to speak at a Wall Street conference for almost half a million dollars. The former President, who left the White House almost 100 days ago, is said to be appearing at Cantor Fitzgeralds LP’s healthcare conference as a keynote speaker in September. Mr Obama’s reported speech fee is nearly twice as much as Hillary Clinton has charged private companies for similar style events.

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

Global warming has pushed the Arctic into a new state unprecedented in human history, with thinning and retreating sea ice, skyrocketing air and sea temperatures, melting permafrost, and glaciers that are shedding ice at increasing rates.  All of these impacts and more may seem remote at first — after all, few of us live in Nunavut — but if you're a coastal resident anywhere in the world, from New York City to Dhaka, Bangladesh, what happens in the Arctic will affect you during the next several decades and beyond, primarily through sea level rise.  SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming The economic effects of all Arctic warming impacts may be enough to dent the gross domestic product of some countries, with cost estimates ranging from $7 trillion to $90 trillion by the end of this century. These are the conclusions of a new, comprehensive assessment of the Arctic climate by a division of the Arctic Council — a cooperative, governing body that helps oversee development in the Far North.  Sea ice (TOP) meets land as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft above Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesThe scientific report, released on Tuesday, is known as Snow, Water, Ice, and Permafrost in the Arctic, or SWIPA. About 90 scientists helped produce the report, while more than two-dozen experts peer-reviewed the results.  The document contains two key findings that anyone concerned about the future of not just the Arctic, but the entire globe, should take note of.  The first is that the Arctic Ocean could be free of summer sea ice starting as early as the late 2030s, which is earlier than other estimates have shown. The second is that rapid Arctic warming is driving greater melting of land ice in the region, which led scientists to conclude that consensus projections of global sea level rise made in 2013 are too conservative. Compared to the previous SWIPA report, which was produced in 2011, the new assessment paints a far more dire picture of an Arctic climate in overdrive.  It also offers hope that action can be taken now to slow down and eventually stabilize Arctic warming after about the year 2050. But time is running out. Even with rapid action to curb global warming pollutants like carbon dioxide and methane, the Arctic most of us grew up with — featuring thick sea ice making the region virtually impenetrable year-round — is gone, and is not likely to return anytime in the next century.  Sea ice thickness trends, showing the thinning trend in recent years.Image: zack labe"... The Arctic of today is different in many respects from the Arctic of the past century, or even the Arctic of 20 years ago," the report states. "Many of the changes underway are due to a simple fact: Ice, snow, and frozen ground — the components of the Arctic cryosphere — are sensitive to heat."  Based on computer model projections, the report states that average fall and winter temperatures in the Arctic will increase up to 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, above late 20th century values by the middle of the century, even if relatively stringent greenhouse gas emissions cuts are made.  Such temperature thresholds are already being reached in some months, with January 2016 recording a temperature anomaly of 9 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981-2010 average for the region, with even higher anomalies seen during October through February of the same year.  This past winter was the warmest on record for the Arctic, and for the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter. This has left sea ice in a precariously thin and sparse state as the upcoming melt season nears.  The report contains valuable findings on what would happen to Arctic climate change if the world were to come close to meeting the goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement. That treaty, which went into force in November 2016, aims to keep global warming to well under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through the year 2100.  It's unclear whether the agreement's goals are still feasible, considering that the U.S. — the world's second-largest emitter — is considering pulling out of it altogether, and other nations have yet to offer plans to cut their emissions in line with the temperature target.  A "drunken forest" in Fairbanks Alaska where trees are collapsing into the ground due to permafrost melt.Image: Warming Images/REX/ShutterstockMeeting the Paris targets would help slow the pace and reduce the severity of Arctic warming, but it "would not stabilize the loss of Arctic glaciers, ice sheets, and ice caps," the report states.  "The recent SWIPA assessment tells that the changes in the Arctic are bound to continue at the current rate until mid-century," said Morten Skovgaard Olsen, who chaired the new report, in an email.  "But it also tells that immediate and ambitious green-house gas reductions will slow the speed of changes beyond mid-century and even stabilize change beyond mid century, preventing major further impacts associated with the Arctic melt .” Any carbon pollution cuts made now will have the most significant influence on what the Arctic will look like after about 2050, the report's authors said at a press conference Tuesday in Virginia.  “The changes are cumulative, and so what we do in the next 5 years is really important on slowing down the changes that will happen in the next 30 or 40 years," said James Overland, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  "The emphasis on action and immediacy is one of the main findings” from the report, he said.  NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice near Pituffik, Greenland.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesForeign ministers from the eight Arctic nations will meet in Fairbanks, Alaska on May 11 to discuss these findings and other issues pertaining to the region. Some discussion on the Paris agreement may take place, particularly along the sidelines of the talks. According to the SWIPA report, meltwater from Arctic glaciers has contributed 35 percent of current sea level rise, with the greatest contribution coming from Greenland.  The planet's largest island lost an average of 375 gigatons of ice per year. This is equivalent to losing a block of ice measuring 4.6 miles on all sides, from 2011 to 2014 alone. It amounts to twice the melt rate from 2003 to 2008. In addition, thawing permafrost is harming infrastructure from Alaska to Siberia, with landslides and mysterious craters swallowing parts of the Russian Arctic.  In Alaska, the report found that wildfires in taiga forests are worse now than at any time in the past 10,000 years, due to hotter, drier summers and earlier spring snowmelt. WATCH: Stunning drone footage captures rare video of blue whales feeding

social-media

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

President Trump lost his first fight over health care and Monday night he appeared to back off threats to force Democrats and Republicans to pay for the border wall. Fmr. GOP Congressman David Jolly and MNSBC's Joy Reid join Lawrence O'Donnell.

Voices from overseas: People from around the world consider Trump's first 100 days

Voices from overseas: People from around the world consider Trump's first 100 days

It was the most stunning political victory of the 21st century, one that brought shocked concern in many parts of the world and cheers in others. One uncontroversial certainty was that it would cause reverberations around the globe. Donald Trump campaigned on an “America First” platform, but has found himself as president drawn into thorny geopolitical complexities aplenty in the first 100 days of his administration.

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Two conservative groups filed a lawsuit against the University of California at Berkeley claiming that a decision to cancel an appearance by the firebrand pundit Ann Coulter violated their right to free speech. The Berkeley College Republicans and Young America's Foundation, which had invited Coulter to speak on April 27, accused the university of seeking to silence conservative viewpoints and stifle political discourse at the famously progressive campus by imposing unreasonable demands on campus events involving certain "high-profile" speakers. "Defendants' discriminatory imposition of curfew and venue restrictions has resulted in the cancellation of two speaking engagements featuring prominent conservative speakers in the month of April, 2017," read the lawsuit filed in federal court in San Francisco.

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

The United States on Tuesday expressed "deep concern" over Turkish air strikes against Kurdish fighters in Syria and Iraq and said they were not authorized by the U.S.-led coalition fighting Islamic State. The raids in Iraq's Sinjar region and northeast Syria killed at least 20 in a campaign against groups linked to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), which has waged a three-decade insurgency against Turkey for Kurdish autonomy. Turkey is part of the U.S.-led military coalition fighting militants in Syria.

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Gov. Asa Hutchinson issued an order in February to execute eight men in 10 days in April because the state's stock of midazolam, a key lethal injection drug, expires at the end of the month.

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

The US State Department has been caught promoting Donald Trump’s Florida golf club Mar-a-Lago, in another apparent ethics violation by the administration. The US Embassy in London's website, which the department is responsible for, featured an article titled “Mar a Lago: Winter White House”. It said Mr Trump “is not the first president to have access to Mar-a-Lago as a Florida retreat, but he is the first one to use it”.

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Several mummies and more than 1,000 figurines have been discovered at an ancient cemetery located at Luxor in Egypt, archaeologists reported. A team of archaeologists with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities uncovered the funerary complex during the ministry's ongoing excavations at the site. The funerary complex contains multiple tombs that were originally built for a man named Userhat, who was a judge in Luxor sometime during what modern-day archaeologists call Egypt's New Kingdom (1550–1070 B.C.) period, the ministry said in a statement.

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

Retail banking giant Wells Fargo has fixed problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan and will now be allowed to open new international branches, US banking regulators said Monday. A Treasury Department agency found this month found the bank's board as early as 2005 had received "regular" reports that employee firings and internal ethics complaints were related to unethical sales practices. Monday's announcement reversed an action taken by the Federal Reserve Board and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, which in December jointly found that Wells Fargo had failed to remedy problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan.

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

By David Mardiste AMARI AIR BASE, Estonia (Reuters) - Two of the U.S. Air Force's newest and most advanced jets landed in the Baltic state of Estonia for the first time on Tuesday, a symbolic gesture meant to reinforce the United States' commitment to the defense of NATO allies that border Russia. The visit of the F-35 stealth fighters, which flew from Britain and spent several hours in Estonia, is part of broader U.S. jet pilot training across Europe as the NATO alliance seeks to deter Moscow from any possible incursion in the Baltics. "This is a very clear message," Estonia's Defense Minister Margus Tsahkna told Reuters.

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

After months of college application tasks and an anxious waiting period, high school seniors are starting to receive college acceptance letters. Many students may be relieved, but the hard work isn't necessarily over. Two current undergraduates recently shared their college decision strategies to help you prepare to pick a college before National College Decision Day on May 1.

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

The stated objective of the Hezbollah-coordinated press tour of southern Lebanon was to see new Israeli defensive installations on the border – indications, according to the powerful Shiite Lebanese militia, of Israeli fears of Hezbollah’s growing military might. The unprecedented spectacle appeared to be a deliberate and calculated breach of a UN Security Council resolution that bans non-state forces from bearing arms in southern Lebanon, and it illustrated the unmatched sway Hezbollah wields, and the impunity it enjoys throughout the country. Recommended: Hezbollah 101: Who is the militant group, and what does it want?

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish warplanes struck suspected Kurdish rebel positions in Iraq and Syria on Tuesday, drawing condemnation from Baghdad and criticism from the U.S.-led coalition fighting the Islamic State group, which is allied with Kurdish factions in both countries.

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

A new survey commissioned by Comcast has ranked apartment-dweller's need for good internet, relative to other niceties like basic hygiene. The conclusion seems to be that good Wi-Fi and high-speed internet are viewed as being the most critical. Comcast probably commissioned this survey to show how relevant its brand is to millennials or something, but the only actual truth to be found is this: Comcast knows that you will put up with basically anything to get good internet, so it's going to squeeze you for every last penny. The survey polled 2015 building managers and developers in the US about what features are the most important for prospective renters. A majority (59%) had either Wi-Fi access or fast internet as the most important feature, comfortably beating out a washer-dryer in unit as the must-have. This isn't so much a statement on the value of technology as it is a stunning indictment of broadband technology in the US. In a supposedly technology-literate, competitive, first-world country, access to the internet should be a given. But thanks to the oligopoly of cable companies that control access to the internet with very little regional competition, you're often left with little or no choice of cable providers. That means that if Verizon or Comcast only choose to supply your building with a 10Mbps, you're out of luck. So really, this survey just confirms to Comcast an important fact about its customers: it doesn't matter how bad the customer service is or if it flat-out calls its customers idiots: you don't have any choice and you need internet, so pucker up, lucky consumers.

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

French presidential frontrunner Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday rejected accusations he was resting on his laurels after winning the first round of the election, insisting "nothing's won yet" in the race against the far right's Marine Le Pen. The 39-year-old centrist said his victory in Sunday's first round of voting was proof that pollsters -- who had long placed him second to Le Pen in the opening round -- "get it wrong". "Nothing's won yet," Macron said during a visit to a hospital near Paris.

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

By Dan Levine SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A U.S. judge on Tuesday blocked President Donald Trump's executive order that sought to withhold federal funds from so-called sanctuary cities, dealing another legal blow to the administration's efforts to toughen immigration enforcement. The ruling from U.S. District Judge William Orrick III in San Francisco said Trump's Jan. 25 order targeted broad categories of federal funding for sanctuary governments and that plaintiffs challenging the order were likely to succeed in proving it unconstitutional.

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

MIAMI (AP) — A former Haitian coup leader and recently elected senator in that country pleaded guilty Monday to a U.S. drug money-laundering charge under a deal that should allow him to avoid a potential sentence of life in prison for cocaine trafficking.

Nature throws humanity a softball, provides bugs that digest plastic

Nature throws humanity a softball, provides bugs that digest plastic

Mother Earth is one seriously gracious host. Humanity has done little else to the planet that produced us than completely destroy it at every turn. We dump toxic oil into oceans, irreversibly alter the climate, drive species into extinction, and pile heaps of trash everywhere we can find space for it. Nature owes us nothing, but it still finds a way to help us save our own hides on a regular basis. The latest example? How about a caterpillar that eats and breaks down the one thing humans have created that pollutes for centuries before decomposing on its own: plastic. Plastic is everywhere, and as far as the Earth is concerned it absolutely sucks. Scientists believe it can take anywhere from 400 to 1,000 years for common disposable plastic products like bags, bottles, and containers to break down after being thrown into a landfill — or flying out of your car window and into a ditch. That's a long, long time, and it makes plastic a particularly bad pollutant. Now, researchers believe they've stumbled upon a natural plastic decomposition tool that has been crawling around right under our feet, in the form of Galleria mellonella, the greater wax moth. Scientists from Cambridge University just discovered that the moth's larva can actually eat and break down plastic in a similar way to beeswax, which the moth regularly consumes. Its digestive system breaks up the chemical bonds of polyethylene and makes the insects a powerful tool against the seemingly unending flood of plastic waste around the globe. Unfortunately, solving the problems of plastic pollution isn't as simple as dumping a bunch of moth larva into landfills; scientists first have to fully study and detail the unique process in the bug's gut that is giving it its remarkable power. Once researchers know exactly how the moth is performing its trick they could apply that knowledge to large-scale efforts to biodegrade junk plastic in places where it causes the most problems, such as the ocean and other pollution hot spots.

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

The US Supreme Court on Monday turned back an appeal by rights groups seeking to make public a damning report on the CIA's post-September 11 torture program, ensuring it will remain secret. The court rebuffed arguments from the American Civil Liberties Union that the highly classified report, compiled in 2014 by the Senate Intelligence Committee, should be released based on US government transparency rules. "We are disappointed by this major setback for government transparency and accountability.

Erdogan says Turkey won't wait at Europe's door forever

Erdogan says Turkey won't wait at Europe's door forever

By Samia Nakhoul, Nick Tattersall and Orhan Coskun ANKARA (Reuters) - Turkey will not wait at Europe's door forever and is ready to walk away from EU accession talks if rising Islamophobia and hostility from some member states persist, President Tayyip Erdogan told Reuters in a wide-ranging interview on Tuesday. Speaking at the presidential palace less than two weeks after winning sweeping new powers in a referendum, a relaxed Erdogan said a decision by a leading European human rights body to put Turkey back on a watch list was "entirely political" and that Ankara did not recognize the move. The Strasbourg-based Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe said it put Turkey back on review over its crackdown on dissent since last year's coup attempt, rights violations, and concerns about Erdogan's increased grip on power.

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

Less than two years after officially launching its Pony Car beyond its domestic US borders, the Ford Mustang is the world's best-selling sportscar. In all, Ford sold 150,000 Mustangs around the world in 2016 which, according to the latest industry data from IHS Markit, means the car is not only America's most popular sportscar, it has now conquered the world, too, despite some hard-hitting European and Japanese competition. The Mustang has outsold the Mazda MX-5 Miata, BMW 4 Series, Nissan 370Z and the venerable Porsche 911 among others to claim the top spot, leaving many to ponder why it took Ford so long -- 51 years -- to finally offer its most famous muscle car to European and Asian customers.

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

SAO PAULO (AP) — Twelve men suspected of taking part in a dramatic, multimillion-dollar theft from an armored car company in a Paraguayan border city have been arrested in Brazil, officials in the Brazilian Federal Police said Tuesday.

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

Reports of American workers being short on their retirement funds are rampant. The National Institute on Retirement Security frames the "underfunded" issue in real dollar terms, noting that retirement savings are "dangerously low", and the U.S. retirement savings deficit is between $6.8 and $14 trillion. Yes, too many Americans are underfunded in the retirement accounts -- but how do you know exactly how much you're underfunded?

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

Global warming has pushed the Arctic into a new state unprecedented in human history, with thinning and retreating sea ice, skyrocketing air and sea temperatures, melting permafrost, and glaciers that are shedding ice at increasing rates.  All of these impacts and more may seem remote at first — after all, few of us live in Nunavut — but if you're a coastal resident anywhere in the world, from New York City to Dhaka, Bangladesh, what happens in the Arctic will affect you during the next several decades and beyond, primarily through sea level rise.  SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming The economic effects of all Arctic warming impacts may be enough to dent the gross domestic product of some countries, with cost estimates ranging from $7 trillion to $90 trillion by the end of this century. These are the conclusions of a new, comprehensive assessment of the Arctic climate by a division of the Arctic Council — a cooperative, governing body that helps oversee development in the Far North.  Sea ice (TOP) meets land as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft above Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesThe scientific report, released on Tuesday, is known as Snow, Water, Ice, and Permafrost in the Arctic, or SWIPA. About 90 scientists helped produce the report, while more than two-dozen experts peer-reviewed the results.  The document contains two key findings that anyone concerned about the future of not just the Arctic, but the entire globe, should take note of.  The first is that the Arctic Ocean could be free of summer sea ice starting as early as the late 2030s, which is earlier than other estimates have shown. The second is that rapid Arctic warming is driving greater melting of land ice in the region, which led scientists to conclude that consensus projections of global sea level rise made in 2013 are too conservative. Compared to the previous SWIPA report, which was produced in 2011, the new assessment paints a far more dire picture of an Arctic climate in overdrive.  It also offers hope that action can be taken now to slow down and eventually stabilize Arctic warming after about the year 2050. But time is running out. Even with rapid action to curb global warming pollutants like carbon dioxide and methane, the Arctic most of us grew up with — featuring thick sea ice making the region virtually impenetrable year-round — is gone, and is not likely to return anytime in the next century.  Sea ice thickness trends, showing the thinning trend in recent years.Image: zack labe"... The Arctic of today is different in many respects from the Arctic of the past century, or even the Arctic of 20 years ago," the report states. "Many of the changes underway are due to a simple fact: Ice, snow, and frozen ground — the components of the Arctic cryosphere — are sensitive to heat."  Based on computer model projections, the report states that average fall and winter temperatures in the Arctic will increase up to 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, above late 20th century values by the middle of the century, even if relatively stringent greenhouse gas emissions cuts are made.  Such temperature thresholds are already being reached in some months, with January 2016 recording a temperature anomaly of 9 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981-2010 average for the region, with even higher anomalies seen during October through February of the same year.  This past winter was the warmest on record for the Arctic, and for the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter. This has left sea ice in a precariously thin and sparse state as the upcoming melt season nears.  The report contains valuable findings on what would happen to Arctic climate change if the world were to come close to meeting the goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement. That treaty, which went into force in November 2016, aims to keep global warming to well under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through the year 2100.  It's unclear whether the agreement's goals are still feasible, considering that the U.S. — the world's second-largest emitter — is considering pulling out of it altogether, and other nations have yet to offer plans to cut their emissions in line with the temperature target.  A "drunken forest" in Fairbanks Alaska where trees are collapsing into the ground due to permafrost melt.Image: Warming Images/REX/ShutterstockMeeting the Paris targets would help slow the pace and reduce the severity of Arctic warming, but it "would not stabilize the loss of Arctic glaciers, ice sheets, and ice caps," the report states.  "The recent SWIPA assessment tells that the changes in the Arctic are bound to continue at the current rate until mid-century," said Morten Skovgaard Olsen, who chaired the new report, in an email.  "But it also tells that immediate and ambitious green-house gas reductions will slow the speed of changes beyond mid-century and even stabilize change beyond mid century, preventing major further impacts associated with the Arctic melt .” Any carbon pollution cuts made now will have the most significant influence on what the Arctic will look like after about 2050, the report's authors said at a press conference Tuesday in Virginia.  “The changes are cumulative, and so what we do in the next 5 years is really important on slowing down the changes that will happen in the next 30 or 40 years," said James Overland, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  "The emphasis on action and immediacy is one of the main findings” from the report, he said.  NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice near Pituffik, Greenland.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesForeign ministers from the eight Arctic nations will meet in Fairbanks, Alaska on May 11 to discuss these findings and other issues pertaining to the region. Some discussion on the Paris agreement may take place, particularly along the sidelines of the talks. According to the SWIPA report, meltwater from Arctic glaciers has contributed 35 percent of current sea level rise, with the greatest contribution coming from Greenland.  The planet's largest island lost an average of 375 gigatons of ice per year. This is equivalent to losing a block of ice measuring 4.6 miles on all sides, from 2011 to 2014 alone. It amounts to twice the melt rate from 2003 to 2008. In addition, thawing permafrost is harming infrastructure from Alaska to Siberia, with landslides and mysterious craters swallowing parts of the Russian Arctic.  In Alaska, the report found that wildfires in taiga forests are worse now than at any time in the past 10,000 years, due to hotter, drier summers and earlier spring snowmelt. WATCH: Stunning drone footage captures rare video of blue whales feeding

Pentagon chief warns of 'tough year' for Afghanistan

Pentagon chief warns of 'tough year' for Afghanistan

US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis warned of "another tough year" in Afghanistan as he arrived on an unannounced visit Monday, hours after his Afghan counterpart resigned over a deadly Taliban attack that triggered anger and left the embattled army in disarray. Paying his first visit to Afghanistan as Pentagon chief, Mattis met with President Ashraf Ghani and other officials and US military commanders. "We're under no illusions about the challenges associated with this mission," he said at a press conference in Kabul with General John Nicholson, US commander of NATO forces in Afghanistan.

US Navy fires warning flare at Iran vessel in Persian Gulf

US Navy fires warning flare at Iran vessel in Persian Gulf

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — A U.S. Navy guided-missile destroyer fired a warning flare toward an Iranian Revolutionary Guard vessel coming near it in the Persian Gulf, an American official said on Wednesday, the latest tense naval encounter between the two countries.

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

By Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United States slammed South Sudan's President Salva Kiir on Tuesday for the African state's "man-made" famine and ongoing conflict, urging him to fulfill a month-old pledge of a unilateral truce by ordering his troops back to their barracks. "We must see a sign that progress is possible," U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley told a United Nations Security Council briefing on South Sudan. "We must see that ceasefire implemented." South Sudan descended into civil war in 2013 after Kiir fired his deputy, unleashing a conflict that has spawned armed factions often following ethnic lines.

20 Ways To Save Money

20 Ways To Save Money

Some are tougher to achieve than others, and you'll need to weigh the necessary sacrifice against the return.

security

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

President Trump lost his first fight over health care and Monday night he appeared to back off threats to force Democrats and Republicans to pay for the border wall. Fmr. GOP Congressman David Jolly and MNSBC's Joy Reid join Lawrence O'Donnell.

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Two conservative groups filed a lawsuit against the University of California at Berkeley claiming that a decision to cancel an appearance by the firebrand pundit Ann Coulter violated their right to free speech. The Berkeley College Republicans and Young America's Foundation, which had invited Coulter to speak on April 27, accused the university of seeking to silence conservative viewpoints and stifle political discourse at the famously progressive campus by imposing unreasonable demands on campus events involving certain "high-profile" speakers. "Defendants' discriminatory imposition of curfew and venue restrictions has resulted in the cancellation of two speaking engagements featuring prominent conservative speakers in the month of April, 2017," read the lawsuit filed in federal court in San Francisco.

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

The United States on Tuesday expressed "deep concern" over Turkish air strikes against Kurdish fighters in Syria and Iraq and said they were not authorized by the U.S.-led coalition fighting Islamic State. The raids in Iraq's Sinjar region and northeast Syria killed at least 20 in a campaign against groups linked to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), which has waged a three-decade insurgency against Turkey for Kurdish autonomy. Turkey is part of the U.S.-led military coalition fighting militants in Syria.

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Gov. Asa Hutchinson issued an order in February to execute eight men in 10 days in April because the state's stock of midazolam, a key lethal injection drug, expires at the end of the month.

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Several mummies and more than 1,000 figurines have been discovered at an ancient cemetery located at Luxor in Egypt, archaeologists reported. A team of archaeologists with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities uncovered the funerary complex during the ministry's ongoing excavations at the site. The funerary complex contains multiple tombs that were originally built for a man named Userhat, who was a judge in Luxor sometime during what modern-day archaeologists call Egypt's New Kingdom (1550–1070 B.C.) period, the ministry said in a statement.

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

Retail banking giant Wells Fargo has fixed problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan and will now be allowed to open new international branches, US banking regulators said Monday. A Treasury Department agency found this month found the bank's board as early as 2005 had received "regular" reports that employee firings and internal ethics complaints were related to unethical sales practices. Monday's announcement reversed an action taken by the Federal Reserve Board and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, which in December jointly found that Wells Fargo had failed to remedy problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan.

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

By David Mardiste AMARI AIR BASE, Estonia (Reuters) - Two of the U.S. Air Force's newest and most advanced jets landed in the Baltic state of Estonia for the first time on Tuesday, a symbolic gesture meant to reinforce the United States' commitment to the defense of NATO allies that border Russia. The visit of the F-35 stealth fighters, which flew from Britain and spent several hours in Estonia, is part of broader U.S. jet pilot training across Europe as the NATO alliance seeks to deter Moscow from any possible incursion in the Baltics. "This is a very clear message," Estonia's Defense Minister Margus Tsahkna told Reuters.

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

The US State Department has been caught promoting Donald Trump’s Florida golf club Mar-a-Lago, in another apparent ethics violation by the administration. The US Embassy in London's website, which the department is responsible for, featured an article titled “Mar a Lago: Winter White House”. It said Mr Trump “is not the first president to have access to Mar-a-Lago as a Florida retreat, but he is the first one to use it”.

Tennessee teacher planned to take 15-year-old girl to Mexico

Tennessee teacher planned to take 15-year-old girl to Mexico

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A Tennessee teacher charged with kidnapping a 15-year-old student and driving her to California had planned to take the girl to Mexico and took a boat from San Diego on a test run, according to federal court documents filed Monday.

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

The stated objective of the Hezbollah-coordinated press tour of southern Lebanon was to see new Israeli defensive installations on the border – indications, according to the powerful Shiite Lebanese militia, of Israeli fears of Hezbollah’s growing military might. The unprecedented spectacle appeared to be a deliberate and calculated breach of a UN Security Council resolution that bans non-state forces from bearing arms in southern Lebanon, and it illustrated the unmatched sway Hezbollah wields, and the impunity it enjoys throughout the country. Recommended: Hezbollah 101: Who is the militant group, and what does it want?

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

After months of college application tasks and an anxious waiting period, high school seniors are starting to receive college acceptance letters. Many students may be relieved, but the hard work isn't necessarily over. Two current undergraduates recently shared their college decision strategies to help you prepare to pick a college before National College Decision Day on May 1.

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

French presidential frontrunner Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday rejected accusations he was resting on his laurels after winning the first round of the election, insisting "nothing's won yet" in the race against the far right's Marine Le Pen. The 39-year-old centrist said his victory in Sunday's first round of voting was proof that pollsters -- who had long placed him second to Le Pen in the opening round -- "get it wrong". "Nothing's won yet," Macron said during a visit to a hospital near Paris.

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

A new survey commissioned by Comcast has ranked apartment-dweller's need for good internet, relative to other niceties like basic hygiene. The conclusion seems to be that good Wi-Fi and high-speed internet are viewed as being the most critical. Comcast probably commissioned this survey to show how relevant its brand is to millennials or something, but the only actual truth to be found is this: Comcast knows that you will put up with basically anything to get good internet, so it's going to squeeze you for every last penny. The survey polled 2015 building managers and developers in the US about what features are the most important for prospective renters. A majority (59%) had either Wi-Fi access or fast internet as the most important feature, comfortably beating out a washer-dryer in unit as the must-have. This isn't so much a statement on the value of technology as it is a stunning indictment of broadband technology in the US. In a supposedly technology-literate, competitive, first-world country, access to the internet should be a given. But thanks to the oligopoly of cable companies that control access to the internet with very little regional competition, you're often left with little or no choice of cable providers. That means that if Verizon or Comcast only choose to supply your building with a 10Mbps, you're out of luck. So really, this survey just confirms to Comcast an important fact about its customers: it doesn't matter how bad the customer service is or if it flat-out calls its customers idiots: you don't have any choice and you need internet, so pucker up, lucky consumers.

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

By Dan Levine SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A U.S. judge on Tuesday blocked President Donald Trump's executive order that sought to withhold federal funds from so-called sanctuary cities, dealing another legal blow to the administration's efforts to toughen immigration enforcement. The ruling from U.S. District Judge William Orrick III in San Francisco said Trump's Jan. 25 order targeted broad categories of federal funding for sanctuary governments and that plaintiffs challenging the order were likely to succeed in proving it unconstitutional.

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

MIAMI (AP) — A former Haitian coup leader and recently elected senator in that country pleaded guilty Monday to a U.S. drug money-laundering charge under a deal that should allow him to avoid a potential sentence of life in prison for cocaine trafficking.

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish warplanes struck suspected Kurdish rebel positions in Iraq and Syria on Tuesday, drawing condemnation from Baghdad and criticism from the U.S.-led coalition fighting the Islamic State group, which is allied with Kurdish factions in both countries.

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

Global warming has pushed the Arctic into a new state unprecedented in human history, with thinning and retreating sea ice, skyrocketing air and sea temperatures, melting permafrost, and glaciers that are shedding ice at increasing rates.  All of these impacts and more may seem remote at first — after all, few of us live in Nunavut — but if you're a coastal resident anywhere in the world, from New York City to Dhaka, Bangladesh, what happens in the Arctic will affect you during the next several decades and beyond, primarily through sea level rise.  SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming The economic effects of all Arctic warming impacts may be enough to dent the gross domestic product of some countries, with cost estimates ranging from $7 trillion to $90 trillion by the end of this century. These are the conclusions of a new, comprehensive assessment of the Arctic climate by a division of the Arctic Council — a cooperative, governing body that helps oversee development in the Far North.  Sea ice (TOP) meets land as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft above Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesThe scientific report, released on Tuesday, is known as Snow, Water, Ice, and Permafrost in the Arctic, or SWIPA. About 90 scientists helped produce the report, while more than two-dozen experts peer-reviewed the results.  The document contains two key findings that anyone concerned about the future of not just the Arctic, but the entire globe, should take note of.  The first is that the Arctic Ocean could be free of summer sea ice starting as early as the late 2030s, which is earlier than other estimates have shown. The second is that rapid Arctic warming is driving greater melting of land ice in the region, which led scientists to conclude that consensus projections of global sea level rise made in 2013 are too conservative. Compared to the previous SWIPA report, which was produced in 2011, the new assessment paints a far more dire picture of an Arctic climate in overdrive.  It also offers hope that action can be taken now to slow down and eventually stabilize Arctic warming after about the year 2050. But time is running out. Even with rapid action to curb global warming pollutants like carbon dioxide and methane, the Arctic most of us grew up with — featuring thick sea ice making the region virtually impenetrable year-round — is gone, and is not likely to return anytime in the next century.  Sea ice thickness trends, showing the thinning trend in recent years.Image: zack labe"... The Arctic of today is different in many respects from the Arctic of the past century, or even the Arctic of 20 years ago," the report states. "Many of the changes underway are due to a simple fact: Ice, snow, and frozen ground — the components of the Arctic cryosphere — are sensitive to heat."  Based on computer model projections, the report states that average fall and winter temperatures in the Arctic will increase up to 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, above late 20th century values by the middle of the century, even if relatively stringent greenhouse gas emissions cuts are made.  Such temperature thresholds are already being reached in some months, with January 2016 recording a temperature anomaly of 9 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981-2010 average for the region, with even higher anomalies seen during October through February of the same year.  This past winter was the warmest on record for the Arctic, and for the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter. This has left sea ice in a precariously thin and sparse state as the upcoming melt season nears.  The report contains valuable findings on what would happen to Arctic climate change if the world were to come close to meeting the goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement. That treaty, which went into force in November 2016, aims to keep global warming to well under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through the year 2100.  It's unclear whether the agreement's goals are still feasible, considering that the U.S. — the world's second-largest emitter — is considering pulling out of it altogether, and other nations have yet to offer plans to cut their emissions in line with the temperature target.  A "drunken forest" in Fairbanks Alaska where trees are collapsing into the ground due to permafrost melt.Image: Warming Images/REX/ShutterstockMeeting the Paris targets would help slow the pace and reduce the severity of Arctic warming, but it "would not stabilize the loss of Arctic glaciers, ice sheets, and ice caps," the report states.  "The recent SWIPA assessment tells that the changes in the Arctic are bound to continue at the current rate until mid-century," said Morten Skovgaard Olsen, who chaired the new report, in an email.  "But it also tells that immediate and ambitious green-house gas reductions will slow the speed of changes beyond mid-century and even stabilize change beyond mid century, preventing major further impacts associated with the Arctic melt .” Any carbon pollution cuts made now will have the most significant influence on what the Arctic will look like after about 2050, the report's authors said at a press conference Tuesday in Virginia.  “The changes are cumulative, and so what we do in the next 5 years is really important on slowing down the changes that will happen in the next 30 or 40 years," said James Overland, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  "The emphasis on action and immediacy is one of the main findings” from the report, he said.  NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice near Pituffik, Greenland.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesForeign ministers from the eight Arctic nations will meet in Fairbanks, Alaska on May 11 to discuss these findings and other issues pertaining to the region. Some discussion on the Paris agreement may take place, particularly along the sidelines of the talks. According to the SWIPA report, meltwater from Arctic glaciers has contributed 35 percent of current sea level rise, with the greatest contribution coming from Greenland.  The planet's largest island lost an average of 375 gigatons of ice per year. This is equivalent to losing a block of ice measuring 4.6 miles on all sides, from 2011 to 2014 alone. It amounts to twice the melt rate from 2003 to 2008. In addition, thawing permafrost is harming infrastructure from Alaska to Siberia, with landslides and mysterious craters swallowing parts of the Russian Arctic.  In Alaska, the report found that wildfires in taiga forests are worse now than at any time in the past 10,000 years, due to hotter, drier summers and earlier spring snowmelt. WATCH: Stunning drone footage captures rare video of blue whales feeding

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

The US Supreme Court on Monday turned back an appeal by rights groups seeking to make public a damning report on the CIA's post-September 11 torture program, ensuring it will remain secret. The court rebuffed arguments from the American Civil Liberties Union that the highly classified report, compiled in 2014 by the Senate Intelligence Committee, should be released based on US government transparency rules. "We are disappointed by this major setback for government transparency and accountability.

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

By Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United States slammed South Sudan's President Salva Kiir on Tuesday for the African state's "man-made" famine and ongoing conflict, urging him to fulfill a month-old pledge of a unilateral truce by ordering his troops back to their barracks. "We must see a sign that progress is possible," U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley told a United Nations Security Council briefing on South Sudan. "We must see that ceasefire implemented." South Sudan descended into civil war in 2013 after Kiir fired his deputy, unleashing a conflict that has spawned armed factions often following ethnic lines.

20 Ways To Save Money

20 Ways To Save Money

Some are tougher to achieve than others, and you'll need to weigh the necessary sacrifice against the return.

Behold: This Galaxy Note 8 blows the Galaxy S8 out of the water

Behold: This Galaxy Note 8 blows the Galaxy S8 out of the water

Samsung's Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ were finally released this past Friday, and it seems like the phones are already well on their way to becoming a smash hit. The South Korean electronics giant announced Monday morning that combined Galaxy S8 and S8+ pre-orders out-sold Samsung's previous-generation Galaxy S7 and S7 edge by 30%. As a quick reminder, the S7 and S7 edge were Samsung's best-selling phones ever. If you picked up a new Galaxy S8 on Friday or over the weekend, rest assured that you now hold the most stunning smartphones that have ever existed. They're also two of the most powerful smartphones that have ever existed. In fact, there's almost nothing on Earth that could possibly give you buyer's remorse. Almost nothing... When an early adopter buys a new flagship iPhone, he or she knows that there will be a full year to wait (and save up money) before an even better new flagship iPhone launches. In Samsung's case, however, there's a much shorter buffer in between flagship releases. In the first half of each year, Samsung updates its Galaxy S lineup. The Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ are the company's flagship smartphones for the first half of 2017 and as you read in our Galaxy S8 review, they're incredible. Then, in the second half of 2017, Samsung will update its Note line with the all-new Galaxy Note 8. If the Note 8 looks anything like this, Galaxy S8 and S8+ owners should prepare to be very, very jealous. Graphic designer Muhsin M. Belaal Auckburaully teamed up with YouTube channel DBS Designing to completely reimagine Samsung's Galaxy Note series using design cues from the Galaxy S8 along with rumors we've heard so far. The results, as you can see, are absolutely stunning. Unlike most concept smartphones we see out there, this Galaxy Note 8 is actually rooted in reality. It likely doesn't look exactly like the Note 8 Samsung will release later this year, but we're willing to bet that it's close. Hopefully Samsung sticks with the precedent set by the Galaxy S8, however, and ditches that distracting logo from the front of the phone. As for specs, Auckburaully stays well within the realm of reality by sticking with the rumors we've heard so far. The Note 8 should feature a huge 6.4-inch QHD+ display and a screen-to-body ratio that's even better than the 83% ratio on the Galaxy S8. Other expected specs include 6GB of RAM, 64GB or 128GB of storage, microSDXC support, a new dual-lens rear camera setup, an iris scanner, and a huge 4,000 mAh battery that hopefully doesn't explode. More images of Auckburaully's Galaxy Note 8 design can be seen on his Behance page, and a video featuring the design is embedded below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0p3CAs9ZP0

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

Less than two years after officially launching its Pony Car beyond its domestic US borders, the Ford Mustang is the world's best-selling sportscar. In all, Ford sold 150,000 Mustangs around the world in 2016 which, according to the latest industry data from IHS Markit, means the car is not only America's most popular sportscar, it has now conquered the world, too, despite some hard-hitting European and Japanese competition. The Mustang has outsold the Mazda MX-5 Miata, BMW 4 Series, Nissan 370Z and the venerable Porsche 911 among others to claim the top spot, leaving many to ponder why it took Ford so long -- 51 years -- to finally offer its most famous muscle car to European and Asian customers.

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

SAO PAULO (AP) — Twelve men suspected of taking part in a dramatic, multimillion-dollar theft from an armored car company in a Paraguayan border city have been arrested in Brazil, officials in the Brazilian Federal Police said Tuesday.

Iran nuclear deal under review as uncertainty grows

Iran nuclear deal under review as uncertainty grows

Iran and major powers met Tuesday in Vienna to review adherence to their 2015 nuclear deal as uncertainty grows about the landmark accord's future under US President Donald Trump. The regular quarterly meeting heard, as Washington confirmed last week, that Iran is sticking to its side of the deal with the United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany, diplomats said. The accord saw Tehran drastically curb its nuclear activities in order to ease concerns that Iran wanted to build an atomic bomb.

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

Reports of American workers being short on their retirement funds are rampant. The National Institute on Retirement Security frames the "underfunded" issue in real dollar terms, noting that retirement savings are "dangerously low", and the U.S. retirement savings deficit is between $6.8 and $14 trillion. Yes, too many Americans are underfunded in the retirement accounts -- but how do you know exactly how much you're underfunded?

Scots don't want another independence vote: Kantar poll

Scots don't want another independence vote: Kantar poll

Most Scottish voters do not want another referendum on independence from the United Kingdom and support for secession itself appears to have weakened, according to a Kantar survey. Scots voted by a wide margin to stick with the European Union in last June's referendum, clashing with the UK as a whole which voted to leave. Scotland's devolved government, run by the Scottish National Party (SNP), says this means the country should be given a new chance to decide whether it wants to split from the UK.

open-source

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

President Trump lost his first fight over health care and Monday night he appeared to back off threats to force Democrats and Republicans to pay for the border wall. Fmr. GOP Congressman David Jolly and MNSBC's Joy Reid join Lawrence O'Donnell.

Voices from overseas: People from around the world consider Trump's first 100 days

Voices from overseas: People from around the world consider Trump's first 100 days

It was the most stunning political victory of the 21st century, one that brought shocked concern in many parts of the world and cheers in others. One uncontroversial certainty was that it would cause reverberations around the globe. Donald Trump campaigned on an “America First” platform, but has found himself as president drawn into thorny geopolitical complexities aplenty in the first 100 days of his administration.

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Two conservative groups filed a lawsuit against the University of California at Berkeley claiming that a decision to cancel an appearance by the firebrand pundit Ann Coulter violated their right to free speech. The Berkeley College Republicans and Young America's Foundation, which had invited Coulter to speak on April 27, accused the university of seeking to silence conservative viewpoints and stifle political discourse at the famously progressive campus by imposing unreasonable demands on campus events involving certain "high-profile" speakers. "Defendants' discriminatory imposition of curfew and venue restrictions has resulted in the cancellation of two speaking engagements featuring prominent conservative speakers in the month of April, 2017," read the lawsuit filed in federal court in San Francisco.

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

The United States on Tuesday expressed "deep concern" over Turkish air strikes against Kurdish fighters in Syria and Iraq and said they were not authorized by the U.S.-led coalition fighting Islamic State. The raids in Iraq's Sinjar region and northeast Syria killed at least 20 in a campaign against groups linked to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), which has waged a three-decade insurgency against Turkey for Kurdish autonomy. Turkey is part of the U.S.-led military coalition fighting militants in Syria.

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Gov. Asa Hutchinson issued an order in February to execute eight men in 10 days in April because the state's stock of midazolam, a key lethal injection drug, expires at the end of the month.

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

The US State Department has been caught promoting Donald Trump’s Florida golf club Mar-a-Lago, in another apparent ethics violation by the administration. The US Embassy in London's website, which the department is responsible for, featured an article titled “Mar a Lago: Winter White House”. It said Mr Trump “is not the first president to have access to Mar-a-Lago as a Florida retreat, but he is the first one to use it”.

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Several mummies and more than 1,000 figurines have been discovered at an ancient cemetery located at Luxor in Egypt, archaeologists reported. A team of archaeologists with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities uncovered the funerary complex during the ministry's ongoing excavations at the site. The funerary complex contains multiple tombs that were originally built for a man named Userhat, who was a judge in Luxor sometime during what modern-day archaeologists call Egypt's New Kingdom (1550–1070 B.C.) period, the ministry said in a statement.

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

Retail banking giant Wells Fargo has fixed problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan and will now be allowed to open new international branches, US banking regulators said Monday. A Treasury Department agency found this month found the bank's board as early as 2005 had received "regular" reports that employee firings and internal ethics complaints were related to unethical sales practices. Monday's announcement reversed an action taken by the Federal Reserve Board and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, which in December jointly found that Wells Fargo had failed to remedy problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan.

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

By David Mardiste AMARI AIR BASE, Estonia (Reuters) - Two of the U.S. Air Force's newest and most advanced jets landed in the Baltic state of Estonia for the first time on Tuesday, a symbolic gesture meant to reinforce the United States' commitment to the defense of NATO allies that border Russia. The visit of the F-35 stealth fighters, which flew from Britain and spent several hours in Estonia, is part of broader U.S. jet pilot training across Europe as the NATO alliance seeks to deter Moscow from any possible incursion in the Baltics. "This is a very clear message," Estonia's Defense Minister Margus Tsahkna told Reuters.

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

After months of college application tasks and an anxious waiting period, high school seniors are starting to receive college acceptance letters. Many students may be relieved, but the hard work isn't necessarily over. Two current undergraduates recently shared their college decision strategies to help you prepare to pick a college before National College Decision Day on May 1.

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

The stated objective of the Hezbollah-coordinated press tour of southern Lebanon was to see new Israeli defensive installations on the border – indications, according to the powerful Shiite Lebanese militia, of Israeli fears of Hezbollah’s growing military might. The unprecedented spectacle appeared to be a deliberate and calculated breach of a UN Security Council resolution that bans non-state forces from bearing arms in southern Lebanon, and it illustrated the unmatched sway Hezbollah wields, and the impunity it enjoys throughout the country. Recommended: Hezbollah 101: Who is the militant group, and what does it want?

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish warplanes struck suspected Kurdish rebel positions in Iraq and Syria on Tuesday, drawing condemnation from Baghdad and criticism from the U.S.-led coalition fighting the Islamic State group, which is allied with Kurdish factions in both countries.

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

A new survey commissioned by Comcast has ranked apartment-dweller's need for good internet, relative to other niceties like basic hygiene. The conclusion seems to be that good Wi-Fi and high-speed internet are viewed as being the most critical. Comcast probably commissioned this survey to show how relevant its brand is to millennials or something, but the only actual truth to be found is this: Comcast knows that you will put up with basically anything to get good internet, so it's going to squeeze you for every last penny. The survey polled 2015 building managers and developers in the US about what features are the most important for prospective renters. A majority (59%) had either Wi-Fi access or fast internet as the most important feature, comfortably beating out a washer-dryer in unit as the must-have. This isn't so much a statement on the value of technology as it is a stunning indictment of broadband technology in the US. In a supposedly technology-literate, competitive, first-world country, access to the internet should be a given. But thanks to the oligopoly of cable companies that control access to the internet with very little regional competition, you're often left with little or no choice of cable providers. That means that if Verizon or Comcast only choose to supply your building with a 10Mbps, you're out of luck. So really, this survey just confirms to Comcast an important fact about its customers: it doesn't matter how bad the customer service is or if it flat-out calls its customers idiots: you don't have any choice and you need internet, so pucker up, lucky consumers.

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

French presidential frontrunner Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday rejected accusations he was resting on his laurels after winning the first round of the election, insisting "nothing's won yet" in the race against the far right's Marine Le Pen. The 39-year-old centrist said his victory in Sunday's first round of voting was proof that pollsters -- who had long placed him second to Le Pen in the opening round -- "get it wrong". "Nothing's won yet," Macron said during a visit to a hospital near Paris.

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

By Dan Levine SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A U.S. judge on Tuesday blocked President Donald Trump's executive order that sought to withhold federal funds from so-called sanctuary cities, dealing another legal blow to the administration's efforts to toughen immigration enforcement. The ruling from U.S. District Judge William Orrick III in San Francisco said Trump's Jan. 25 order targeted broad categories of federal funding for sanctuary governments and that plaintiffs challenging the order were likely to succeed in proving it unconstitutional.

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

MIAMI (AP) — A former Haitian coup leader and recently elected senator in that country pleaded guilty Monday to a U.S. drug money-laundering charge under a deal that should allow him to avoid a potential sentence of life in prison for cocaine trafficking.

Nature throws humanity a softball, provides bugs that digest plastic

Nature throws humanity a softball, provides bugs that digest plastic

Mother Earth is one seriously gracious host. Humanity has done little else to the planet that produced us than completely destroy it at every turn. We dump toxic oil into oceans, irreversibly alter the climate, drive species into extinction, and pile heaps of trash everywhere we can find space for it. Nature owes us nothing, but it still finds a way to help us save our own hides on a regular basis. The latest example? How about a caterpillar that eats and breaks down the one thing humans have created that pollutes for centuries before decomposing on its own: plastic. Plastic is everywhere, and as far as the Earth is concerned it absolutely sucks. Scientists believe it can take anywhere from 400 to 1,000 years for common disposable plastic products like bags, bottles, and containers to break down after being thrown into a landfill — or flying out of your car window and into a ditch. That's a long, long time, and it makes plastic a particularly bad pollutant. Now, researchers believe they've stumbled upon a natural plastic decomposition tool that has been crawling around right under our feet, in the form of Galleria mellonella, the greater wax moth. Scientists from Cambridge University just discovered that the moth's larva can actually eat and break down plastic in a similar way to beeswax, which the moth regularly consumes. Its digestive system breaks up the chemical bonds of polyethylene and makes the insects a powerful tool against the seemingly unending flood of plastic waste around the globe. Unfortunately, solving the problems of plastic pollution isn't as simple as dumping a bunch of moth larva into landfills; scientists first have to fully study and detail the unique process in the bug's gut that is giving it its remarkable power. Once researchers know exactly how the moth is performing its trick they could apply that knowledge to large-scale efforts to biodegrade junk plastic in places where it causes the most problems, such as the ocean and other pollution hot spots.

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

The US Supreme Court on Monday turned back an appeal by rights groups seeking to make public a damning report on the CIA's post-September 11 torture program, ensuring it will remain secret. The court rebuffed arguments from the American Civil Liberties Union that the highly classified report, compiled in 2014 by the Senate Intelligence Committee, should be released based on US government transparency rules. "We are disappointed by this major setback for government transparency and accountability.

Erdogan says Turkey won't wait at Europe's door forever

Erdogan says Turkey won't wait at Europe's door forever

By Samia Nakhoul, Nick Tattersall and Orhan Coskun ANKARA (Reuters) - Turkey will not wait at Europe's door forever and is ready to walk away from EU accession talks if rising Islamophobia and hostility from some member states persist, President Tayyip Erdogan told Reuters in a wide-ranging interview on Tuesday. Speaking at the presidential palace less than two weeks after winning sweeping new powers in a referendum, a relaxed Erdogan said a decision by a leading European human rights body to put Turkey back on a watch list was "entirely political" and that Ankara did not recognize the move. The Strasbourg-based Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe said it put Turkey back on review over its crackdown on dissent since last year's coup attempt, rights violations, and concerns about Erdogan's increased grip on power.

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

Less than two years after officially launching its Pony Car beyond its domestic US borders, the Ford Mustang is the world's best-selling sportscar. In all, Ford sold 150,000 Mustangs around the world in 2016 which, according to the latest industry data from IHS Markit, means the car is not only America's most popular sportscar, it has now conquered the world, too, despite some hard-hitting European and Japanese competition. The Mustang has outsold the Mazda MX-5 Miata, BMW 4 Series, Nissan 370Z and the venerable Porsche 911 among others to claim the top spot, leaving many to ponder why it took Ford so long -- 51 years -- to finally offer its most famous muscle car to European and Asian customers.

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

SAO PAULO (AP) — Twelve men suspected of taking part in a dramatic, multimillion-dollar theft from an armored car company in a Paraguayan border city have been arrested in Brazil, officials in the Brazilian Federal Police said Tuesday.

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

Reports of American workers being short on their retirement funds are rampant. The National Institute on Retirement Security frames the "underfunded" issue in real dollar terms, noting that retirement savings are "dangerously low", and the U.S. retirement savings deficit is between $6.8 and $14 trillion. Yes, too many Americans are underfunded in the retirement accounts -- but how do you know exactly how much you're underfunded?

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

Global warming has pushed the Arctic into a new state unprecedented in human history, with thinning and retreating sea ice, skyrocketing air and sea temperatures, melting permafrost, and glaciers that are shedding ice at increasing rates.  All of these impacts and more may seem remote at first — after all, few of us live in Nunavut — but if you're a coastal resident anywhere in the world, from New York City to Dhaka, Bangladesh, what happens in the Arctic will affect you during the next several decades and beyond, primarily through sea level rise.  SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming The economic effects of all Arctic warming impacts may be enough to dent the gross domestic product of some countries, with cost estimates ranging from $7 trillion to $90 trillion by the end of this century. These are the conclusions of a new, comprehensive assessment of the Arctic climate by a division of the Arctic Council — a cooperative, governing body that helps oversee development in the Far North.  Sea ice (TOP) meets land as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft above Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesThe scientific report, released on Tuesday, is known as Snow, Water, Ice, and Permafrost in the Arctic, or SWIPA. About 90 scientists helped produce the report, while more than two-dozen experts peer-reviewed the results.  The document contains two key findings that anyone concerned about the future of not just the Arctic, but the entire globe, should take note of.  The first is that the Arctic Ocean could be free of summer sea ice starting as early as the late 2030s, which is earlier than other estimates have shown. The second is that rapid Arctic warming is driving greater melting of land ice in the region, which led scientists to conclude that consensus projections of global sea level rise made in 2013 are too conservative. Compared to the previous SWIPA report, which was produced in 2011, the new assessment paints a far more dire picture of an Arctic climate in overdrive.  It also offers hope that action can be taken now to slow down and eventually stabilize Arctic warming after about the year 2050. But time is running out. Even with rapid action to curb global warming pollutants like carbon dioxide and methane, the Arctic most of us grew up with — featuring thick sea ice making the region virtually impenetrable year-round — is gone, and is not likely to return anytime in the next century.  Sea ice thickness trends, showing the thinning trend in recent years.Image: zack labe"... The Arctic of today is different in many respects from the Arctic of the past century, or even the Arctic of 20 years ago," the report states. "Many of the changes underway are due to a simple fact: Ice, snow, and frozen ground — the components of the Arctic cryosphere — are sensitive to heat."  Based on computer model projections, the report states that average fall and winter temperatures in the Arctic will increase up to 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, above late 20th century values by the middle of the century, even if relatively stringent greenhouse gas emissions cuts are made.  Such temperature thresholds are already being reached in some months, with January 2016 recording a temperature anomaly of 9 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981-2010 average for the region, with even higher anomalies seen during October through February of the same year.  This past winter was the warmest on record for the Arctic, and for the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter. This has left sea ice in a precariously thin and sparse state as the upcoming melt season nears.  The report contains valuable findings on what would happen to Arctic climate change if the world were to come close to meeting the goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement. That treaty, which went into force in November 2016, aims to keep global warming to well under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through the year 2100.  It's unclear whether the agreement's goals are still feasible, considering that the U.S. — the world's second-largest emitter — is considering pulling out of it altogether, and other nations have yet to offer plans to cut their emissions in line with the temperature target.  A "drunken forest" in Fairbanks Alaska where trees are collapsing into the ground due to permafrost melt.Image: Warming Images/REX/ShutterstockMeeting the Paris targets would help slow the pace and reduce the severity of Arctic warming, but it "would not stabilize the loss of Arctic glaciers, ice sheets, and ice caps," the report states.  "The recent SWIPA assessment tells that the changes in the Arctic are bound to continue at the current rate until mid-century," said Morten Skovgaard Olsen, who chaired the new report, in an email.  "But it also tells that immediate and ambitious green-house gas reductions will slow the speed of changes beyond mid-century and even stabilize change beyond mid century, preventing major further impacts associated with the Arctic melt .” Any carbon pollution cuts made now will have the most significant influence on what the Arctic will look like after about 2050, the report's authors said at a press conference Tuesday in Virginia.  “The changes are cumulative, and so what we do in the next 5 years is really important on slowing down the changes that will happen in the next 30 or 40 years," said James Overland, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  "The emphasis on action and immediacy is one of the main findings” from the report, he said.  NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice near Pituffik, Greenland.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesForeign ministers from the eight Arctic nations will meet in Fairbanks, Alaska on May 11 to discuss these findings and other issues pertaining to the region. Some discussion on the Paris agreement may take place, particularly along the sidelines of the talks. According to the SWIPA report, meltwater from Arctic glaciers has contributed 35 percent of current sea level rise, with the greatest contribution coming from Greenland.  The planet's largest island lost an average of 375 gigatons of ice per year. This is equivalent to losing a block of ice measuring 4.6 miles on all sides, from 2011 to 2014 alone. It amounts to twice the melt rate from 2003 to 2008. In addition, thawing permafrost is harming infrastructure from Alaska to Siberia, with landslides and mysterious craters swallowing parts of the Russian Arctic.  In Alaska, the report found that wildfires in taiga forests are worse now than at any time in the past 10,000 years, due to hotter, drier summers and earlier spring snowmelt. WATCH: Stunning drone footage captures rare video of blue whales feeding

Pentagon chief warns of 'tough year' for Afghanistan

Pentagon chief warns of 'tough year' for Afghanistan

US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis warned of "another tough year" in Afghanistan as he arrived on an unannounced visit Monday, hours after his Afghan counterpart resigned over a deadly Taliban attack that triggered anger and left the embattled army in disarray. Paying his first visit to Afghanistan as Pentagon chief, Mattis met with President Ashraf Ghani and other officials and US military commanders. "We're under no illusions about the challenges associated with this mission," he said at a press conference in Kabul with General John Nicholson, US commander of NATO forces in Afghanistan.

US Navy fires warning flare at Iran vessel in Persian Gulf

US Navy fires warning flare at Iran vessel in Persian Gulf

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — A U.S. Navy guided-missile destroyer fired a warning flare toward an Iranian Revolutionary Guard vessel coming near it in the Persian Gulf, an American official said on Wednesday, the latest tense naval encounter between the two countries.

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

By Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United States slammed South Sudan's President Salva Kiir on Tuesday for the African state's "man-made" famine and ongoing conflict, urging him to fulfill a month-old pledge of a unilateral truce by ordering his troops back to their barracks. "We must see a sign that progress is possible," U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley told a United Nations Security Council briefing on South Sudan. "We must see that ceasefire implemented." South Sudan descended into civil war in 2013 after Kiir fired his deputy, unleashing a conflict that has spawned armed factions often following ethnic lines.

20 Ways To Save Money

20 Ways To Save Money

Some are tougher to achieve than others, and you'll need to weigh the necessary sacrifice against the return.

gaming

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

President Trump lost his first fight over health care and Monday night he appeared to back off threats to force Democrats and Republicans to pay for the border wall. Fmr. GOP Congressman David Jolly and MNSBC's Joy Reid join Lawrence O'Donnell.

Voices from overseas: People from around the world consider Trump's first 100 days

Voices from overseas: People from around the world consider Trump's first 100 days

It was the most stunning political victory of the 21st century, one that brought shocked concern in many parts of the world and cheers in others. One uncontroversial certainty was that it would cause reverberations around the globe. Donald Trump campaigned on an “America First” platform, but has found himself as president drawn into thorny geopolitical complexities aplenty in the first 100 days of his administration.

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Two conservative groups filed a lawsuit against the University of California at Berkeley claiming that a decision to cancel an appearance by the firebrand pundit Ann Coulter violated their right to free speech. The Berkeley College Republicans and Young America's Foundation, which had invited Coulter to speak on April 27, accused the university of seeking to silence conservative viewpoints and stifle political discourse at the famously progressive campus by imposing unreasonable demands on campus events involving certain "high-profile" speakers. "Defendants' discriminatory imposition of curfew and venue restrictions has resulted in the cancellation of two speaking engagements featuring prominent conservative speakers in the month of April, 2017," read the lawsuit filed in federal court in San Francisco.

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

The United States on Tuesday expressed "deep concern" over Turkish air strikes against Kurdish fighters in Syria and Iraq and said they were not authorized by the U.S.-led coalition fighting Islamic State. The raids in Iraq's Sinjar region and northeast Syria killed at least 20 in a campaign against groups linked to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), which has waged a three-decade insurgency against Turkey for Kurdish autonomy. Turkey is part of the U.S.-led military coalition fighting militants in Syria.

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Gov. Asa Hutchinson issued an order in February to execute eight men in 10 days in April because the state's stock of midazolam, a key lethal injection drug, expires at the end of the month.

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

The US State Department has been caught promoting Donald Trump’s Florida golf club Mar-a-Lago, in another apparent ethics violation by the administration. The US Embassy in London's website, which the department is responsible for, featured an article titled “Mar a Lago: Winter White House”. It said Mr Trump “is not the first president to have access to Mar-a-Lago as a Florida retreat, but he is the first one to use it”.

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Several mummies and more than 1,000 figurines have been discovered at an ancient cemetery located at Luxor in Egypt, archaeologists reported. A team of archaeologists with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities uncovered the funerary complex during the ministry's ongoing excavations at the site. The funerary complex contains multiple tombs that were originally built for a man named Userhat, who was a judge in Luxor sometime during what modern-day archaeologists call Egypt's New Kingdom (1550–1070 B.C.) period, the ministry said in a statement.

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

Retail banking giant Wells Fargo has fixed problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan and will now be allowed to open new international branches, US banking regulators said Monday. A Treasury Department agency found this month found the bank's board as early as 2005 had received "regular" reports that employee firings and internal ethics complaints were related to unethical sales practices. Monday's announcement reversed an action taken by the Federal Reserve Board and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, which in December jointly found that Wells Fargo had failed to remedy problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan.

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

By David Mardiste AMARI AIR BASE, Estonia (Reuters) - Two of the U.S. Air Force's newest and most advanced jets landed in the Baltic state of Estonia for the first time on Tuesday, a symbolic gesture meant to reinforce the United States' commitment to the defense of NATO allies that border Russia. The visit of the F-35 stealth fighters, which flew from Britain and spent several hours in Estonia, is part of broader U.S. jet pilot training across Europe as the NATO alliance seeks to deter Moscow from any possible incursion in the Baltics. "This is a very clear message," Estonia's Defense Minister Margus Tsahkna told Reuters.

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

After months of college application tasks and an anxious waiting period, high school seniors are starting to receive college acceptance letters. Many students may be relieved, but the hard work isn't necessarily over. Two current undergraduates recently shared their college decision strategies to help you prepare to pick a college before National College Decision Day on May 1.

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

The stated objective of the Hezbollah-coordinated press tour of southern Lebanon was to see new Israeli defensive installations on the border – indications, according to the powerful Shiite Lebanese militia, of Israeli fears of Hezbollah’s growing military might. The unprecedented spectacle appeared to be a deliberate and calculated breach of a UN Security Council resolution that bans non-state forces from bearing arms in southern Lebanon, and it illustrated the unmatched sway Hezbollah wields, and the impunity it enjoys throughout the country. Recommended: Hezbollah 101: Who is the militant group, and what does it want?

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish warplanes struck suspected Kurdish rebel positions in Iraq and Syria on Tuesday, drawing condemnation from Baghdad and criticism from the U.S.-led coalition fighting the Islamic State group, which is allied with Kurdish factions in both countries.

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

A new survey commissioned by Comcast has ranked apartment-dweller's need for good internet, relative to other niceties like basic hygiene. The conclusion seems to be that good Wi-Fi and high-speed internet are viewed as being the most critical. Comcast probably commissioned this survey to show how relevant its brand is to millennials or something, but the only actual truth to be found is this: Comcast knows that you will put up with basically anything to get good internet, so it's going to squeeze you for every last penny. The survey polled 2015 building managers and developers in the US about what features are the most important for prospective renters. A majority (59%) had either Wi-Fi access or fast internet as the most important feature, comfortably beating out a washer-dryer in unit as the must-have. This isn't so much a statement on the value of technology as it is a stunning indictment of broadband technology in the US. In a supposedly technology-literate, competitive, first-world country, access to the internet should be a given. But thanks to the oligopoly of cable companies that control access to the internet with very little regional competition, you're often left with little or no choice of cable providers. That means that if Verizon or Comcast only choose to supply your building with a 10Mbps, you're out of luck. So really, this survey just confirms to Comcast an important fact about its customers: it doesn't matter how bad the customer service is or if it flat-out calls its customers idiots: you don't have any choice and you need internet, so pucker up, lucky consumers.

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

French presidential frontrunner Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday rejected accusations he was resting on his laurels after winning the first round of the election, insisting "nothing's won yet" in the race against the far right's Marine Le Pen. The 39-year-old centrist said his victory in Sunday's first round of voting was proof that pollsters -- who had long placed him second to Le Pen in the opening round -- "get it wrong". "Nothing's won yet," Macron said during a visit to a hospital near Paris.

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

By Dan Levine SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A U.S. judge on Tuesday blocked President Donald Trump's executive order that sought to withhold federal funds from so-called sanctuary cities, dealing another legal blow to the administration's efforts to toughen immigration enforcement. The ruling from U.S. District Judge William Orrick III in San Francisco said Trump's Jan. 25 order targeted broad categories of federal funding for sanctuary governments and that plaintiffs challenging the order were likely to succeed in proving it unconstitutional.

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

MIAMI (AP) — A former Haitian coup leader and recently elected senator in that country pleaded guilty Monday to a U.S. drug money-laundering charge under a deal that should allow him to avoid a potential sentence of life in prison for cocaine trafficking.

Nature throws humanity a softball, provides bugs that digest plastic

Nature throws humanity a softball, provides bugs that digest plastic

Mother Earth is one seriously gracious host. Humanity has done little else to the planet that produced us than completely destroy it at every turn. We dump toxic oil into oceans, irreversibly alter the climate, drive species into extinction, and pile heaps of trash everywhere we can find space for it. Nature owes us nothing, but it still finds a way to help us save our own hides on a regular basis. The latest example? How about a caterpillar that eats and breaks down the one thing humans have created that pollutes for centuries before decomposing on its own: plastic. Plastic is everywhere, and as far as the Earth is concerned it absolutely sucks. Scientists believe it can take anywhere from 400 to 1,000 years for common disposable plastic products like bags, bottles, and containers to break down after being thrown into a landfill — or flying out of your car window and into a ditch. That's a long, long time, and it makes plastic a particularly bad pollutant. Now, researchers believe they've stumbled upon a natural plastic decomposition tool that has been crawling around right under our feet, in the form of Galleria mellonella, the greater wax moth. Scientists from Cambridge University just discovered that the moth's larva can actually eat and break down plastic in a similar way to beeswax, which the moth regularly consumes. Its digestive system breaks up the chemical bonds of polyethylene and makes the insects a powerful tool against the seemingly unending flood of plastic waste around the globe. Unfortunately, solving the problems of plastic pollution isn't as simple as dumping a bunch of moth larva into landfills; scientists first have to fully study and detail the unique process in the bug's gut that is giving it its remarkable power. Once researchers know exactly how the moth is performing its trick they could apply that knowledge to large-scale efforts to biodegrade junk plastic in places where it causes the most problems, such as the ocean and other pollution hot spots.

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

The US Supreme Court on Monday turned back an appeal by rights groups seeking to make public a damning report on the CIA's post-September 11 torture program, ensuring it will remain secret. The court rebuffed arguments from the American Civil Liberties Union that the highly classified report, compiled in 2014 by the Senate Intelligence Committee, should be released based on US government transparency rules. "We are disappointed by this major setback for government transparency and accountability.

Erdogan says Turkey won't wait at Europe's door forever

Erdogan says Turkey won't wait at Europe's door forever

By Samia Nakhoul, Nick Tattersall and Orhan Coskun ANKARA (Reuters) - Turkey will not wait at Europe's door forever and is ready to walk away from EU accession talks if rising Islamophobia and hostility from some member states persist, President Tayyip Erdogan told Reuters in a wide-ranging interview on Tuesday. Speaking at the presidential palace less than two weeks after winning sweeping new powers in a referendum, a relaxed Erdogan said a decision by a leading European human rights body to put Turkey back on a watch list was "entirely political" and that Ankara did not recognize the move. The Strasbourg-based Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe said it put Turkey back on review over its crackdown on dissent since last year's coup attempt, rights violations, and concerns about Erdogan's increased grip on power.

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

Less than two years after officially launching its Pony Car beyond its domestic US borders, the Ford Mustang is the world's best-selling sportscar. In all, Ford sold 150,000 Mustangs around the world in 2016 which, according to the latest industry data from IHS Markit, means the car is not only America's most popular sportscar, it has now conquered the world, too, despite some hard-hitting European and Japanese competition. The Mustang has outsold the Mazda MX-5 Miata, BMW 4 Series, Nissan 370Z and the venerable Porsche 911 among others to claim the top spot, leaving many to ponder why it took Ford so long -- 51 years -- to finally offer its most famous muscle car to European and Asian customers.

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

SAO PAULO (AP) — Twelve men suspected of taking part in a dramatic, multimillion-dollar theft from an armored car company in a Paraguayan border city have been arrested in Brazil, officials in the Brazilian Federal Police said Tuesday.

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

Reports of American workers being short on their retirement funds are rampant. The National Institute on Retirement Security frames the "underfunded" issue in real dollar terms, noting that retirement savings are "dangerously low", and the U.S. retirement savings deficit is between $6.8 and $14 trillion. Yes, too many Americans are underfunded in the retirement accounts -- but how do you know exactly how much you're underfunded?

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

Global warming has pushed the Arctic into a new state unprecedented in human history, with thinning and retreating sea ice, skyrocketing air and sea temperatures, melting permafrost, and glaciers that are shedding ice at increasing rates.  All of these impacts and more may seem remote at first — after all, few of us live in Nunavut — but if you're a coastal resident anywhere in the world, from New York City to Dhaka, Bangladesh, what happens in the Arctic will affect you during the next several decades and beyond, primarily through sea level rise.  SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming The economic effects of all Arctic warming impacts may be enough to dent the gross domestic product of some countries, with cost estimates ranging from $7 trillion to $90 trillion by the end of this century. These are the conclusions of a new, comprehensive assessment of the Arctic climate by a division of the Arctic Council — a cooperative, governing body that helps oversee development in the Far North.  Sea ice (TOP) meets land as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft above Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesThe scientific report, released on Tuesday, is known as Snow, Water, Ice, and Permafrost in the Arctic, or SWIPA. About 90 scientists helped produce the report, while more than two-dozen experts peer-reviewed the results.  The document contains two key findings that anyone concerned about the future of not just the Arctic, but the entire globe, should take note of.  The first is that the Arctic Ocean could be free of summer sea ice starting as early as the late 2030s, which is earlier than other estimates have shown. The second is that rapid Arctic warming is driving greater melting of land ice in the region, which led scientists to conclude that consensus projections of global sea level rise made in 2013 are too conservative. Compared to the previous SWIPA report, which was produced in 2011, the new assessment paints a far more dire picture of an Arctic climate in overdrive.  It also offers hope that action can be taken now to slow down and eventually stabilize Arctic warming after about the year 2050. But time is running out. Even with rapid action to curb global warming pollutants like carbon dioxide and methane, the Arctic most of us grew up with — featuring thick sea ice making the region virtually impenetrable year-round — is gone, and is not likely to return anytime in the next century.  Sea ice thickness trends, showing the thinning trend in recent years.Image: zack labe"... The Arctic of today is different in many respects from the Arctic of the past century, or even the Arctic of 20 years ago," the report states. "Many of the changes underway are due to a simple fact: Ice, snow, and frozen ground — the components of the Arctic cryosphere — are sensitive to heat."  Based on computer model projections, the report states that average fall and winter temperatures in the Arctic will increase up to 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, above late 20th century values by the middle of the century, even if relatively stringent greenhouse gas emissions cuts are made.  Such temperature thresholds are already being reached in some months, with January 2016 recording a temperature anomaly of 9 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981-2010 average for the region, with even higher anomalies seen during October through February of the same year.  This past winter was the warmest on record for the Arctic, and for the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter. This has left sea ice in a precariously thin and sparse state as the upcoming melt season nears.  The report contains valuable findings on what would happen to Arctic climate change if the world were to come close to meeting the goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement. That treaty, which went into force in November 2016, aims to keep global warming to well under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through the year 2100.  It's unclear whether the agreement's goals are still feasible, considering that the U.S. — the world's second-largest emitter — is considering pulling out of it altogether, and other nations have yet to offer plans to cut their emissions in line with the temperature target.  A "drunken forest" in Fairbanks Alaska where trees are collapsing into the ground due to permafrost melt.Image: Warming Images/REX/ShutterstockMeeting the Paris targets would help slow the pace and reduce the severity of Arctic warming, but it "would not stabilize the loss of Arctic glaciers, ice sheets, and ice caps," the report states.  "The recent SWIPA assessment tells that the changes in the Arctic are bound to continue at the current rate until mid-century," said Morten Skovgaard Olsen, who chaired the new report, in an email.  "But it also tells that immediate and ambitious green-house gas reductions will slow the speed of changes beyond mid-century and even stabilize change beyond mid century, preventing major further impacts associated with the Arctic melt .” Any carbon pollution cuts made now will have the most significant influence on what the Arctic will look like after about 2050, the report's authors said at a press conference Tuesday in Virginia.  “The changes are cumulative, and so what we do in the next 5 years is really important on slowing down the changes that will happen in the next 30 or 40 years," said James Overland, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  "The emphasis on action and immediacy is one of the main findings” from the report, he said.  NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice near Pituffik, Greenland.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesForeign ministers from the eight Arctic nations will meet in Fairbanks, Alaska on May 11 to discuss these findings and other issues pertaining to the region. Some discussion on the Paris agreement may take place, particularly along the sidelines of the talks. According to the SWIPA report, meltwater from Arctic glaciers has contributed 35 percent of current sea level rise, with the greatest contribution coming from Greenland.  The planet's largest island lost an average of 375 gigatons of ice per year. This is equivalent to losing a block of ice measuring 4.6 miles on all sides, from 2011 to 2014 alone. It amounts to twice the melt rate from 2003 to 2008. In addition, thawing permafrost is harming infrastructure from Alaska to Siberia, with landslides and mysterious craters swallowing parts of the Russian Arctic.  In Alaska, the report found that wildfires in taiga forests are worse now than at any time in the past 10,000 years, due to hotter, drier summers and earlier spring snowmelt. WATCH: Stunning drone footage captures rare video of blue whales feeding

Pentagon chief warns of 'tough year' for Afghanistan

Pentagon chief warns of 'tough year' for Afghanistan

US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis warned of "another tough year" in Afghanistan as he arrived on an unannounced visit Monday, hours after his Afghan counterpart resigned over a deadly Taliban attack that triggered anger and left the embattled army in disarray. Paying his first visit to Afghanistan as Pentagon chief, Mattis met with President Ashraf Ghani and other officials and US military commanders. "We're under no illusions about the challenges associated with this mission," he said at a press conference in Kabul with General John Nicholson, US commander of NATO forces in Afghanistan.

US Navy fires warning flare at Iran vessel in Persian Gulf

US Navy fires warning flare at Iran vessel in Persian Gulf

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — A U.S. Navy guided-missile destroyer fired a warning flare toward an Iranian Revolutionary Guard vessel coming near it in the Persian Gulf, an American official said on Wednesday, the latest tense naval encounter between the two countries.

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

By Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United States slammed South Sudan's President Salva Kiir on Tuesday for the African state's "man-made" famine and ongoing conflict, urging him to fulfill a month-old pledge of a unilateral truce by ordering his troops back to their barracks. "We must see a sign that progress is possible," U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley told a United Nations Security Council briefing on South Sudan. "We must see that ceasefire implemented." South Sudan descended into civil war in 2013 after Kiir fired his deputy, unleashing a conflict that has spawned armed factions often following ethnic lines.

20 Ways To Save Money

20 Ways To Save Money

Some are tougher to achieve than others, and you'll need to weigh the necessary sacrifice against the return.