tech

How GameStop could bounce back after its epic sales miss

How GameStop could bounce back after its epic sales miss

GameStop’s saving grace this year may be Nintendo’s recently released Switch console. GameStop’s (GME) shares plummeted more than 13% on Friday after it reported weak sales the day before, but Nintendo’s new Switch console may help the video game retailer turn things around.

Digital rights report hits Apple for its secrecy

Digital rights report hits Apple for its secrecy

A new report scoring tech companies’s support for digital rights comes to some surprising conclusions. It ranks Google (GOOG, GOOGL) above Apple (AAPL), puts AT&T (T) atop telecommunications firms and even says some modestly nice things about firms in China and Russia.

T-Mobile is making it harder for scammers to call you

T-Mobile is making it harder for scammers to call you

T-Mobile wants to stop phone scammers in their tracks with its newest network upgrade. T-Mobile (TMUS) wants to make it a little bit harder for scammers to call your cellphone. According to T-Mobile’s vice president of engineering, Grant Castle, the feature will hit the carrier’s network and work across all phones regardless of its operating system or the plan you have.

Watch the moment an Amazon drone delivers sunscreen for the first time

Watch the moment an Amazon drone delivers sunscreen for the first time

Amazon has taken another small autonomous step toward drone delivery.  The company completed its first public United States delivery using one of its Prime Air delivery drones at a robotics conference in California on Monday, within the airspace of the Palm Springs Airport. SEE ALSO: Forget taxis; Dubai wants to fly you around in passenger drones The drone lands in a field, drops off a four-plus pound box of sunscreen bottles, and buzzes back up into the sky. Amazon's first drone delivery took place late last year in the United Kingdom, where regulations are a bit more drone-friendly. The drone delivered an Amazon Fire TV and a bag of popcorn.  But Amazon did conduct its U.S. delivery with the FAA's help, which demonstrates coordination and communication on at least some level.  Several legislatures in the U.S. are slowly coming around to robotics. Earlier this month, Virginia passed legislation that allows robots to roam around on sidewalks delivering packages.  Though Amazon doesn't seem to have a plan for ground-based drone delivery, they voiced support for Virginia's move. For them, the greater acceptance of autonomous delivery, the better.  WATCH: Use Jedi mind tricks to command this drone

You can now convert your ordinary bike into an electric one

You can now convert your ordinary bike into an electric one

Don’t have the cash to replace your regular bike with a fancy electric model? Well, you don’t have to. You can now replace your front wheel with an electric one. It’s called UrbanX and has already well surpassed its $50,000 Kickstarter goal, reaching more than $191,000. The wheel will give you a 30-mile range with a 20 mph top speed. It’s also much lighter than the average e-bike, which usually weighs 65 to 90 pounds. UrbanX adds only 15 pounds to your bike, which includes motor, battery, spokes, rim, and tire. ...

Amazon is continuing to define what consumers expect

Amazon is continuing to define what consumers expect

More recent Amazon initiatives such as Prime Now and Flex Delivery aim to deliver orders to your doorstep in two hours or less. When Amazon (AMZN) began offering free two-day shipping to Prime members, that fast shipping time became the new expectation for many customers who were previously accustomed to waiting much longer for their packages. Now, the Seattle-based e-commerce giant is setting the bar even higher  with initiatives such as Prime Now and Amazon Flex, which ship goods to you in two hours and in some cases promise one-hour delivery.

India says no to most of Apple's demands

India says no to most of Apple's demands

Apple is not getting any special treatment from the Indian government.  Despite the company’s imminent plans to begin manufacturing iPhones in the country, the Indian government remains committed to not folding to the Cupertino giant’s demands.  SEE ALSO: Apple had its best year ever in world's fastest growing smartphone market When asked if the government has accepted the iPhone maker’s demands, commerce and industry minister Nirmala Sitharaman told Rajya Sabha (Council of States) that the ministry has said "no" to "most" of them. Apple has put up an "unprecedented" list of demands before the government. "Apple India has sought concessions, including duty exemptions on manufacturing and repair units, components, capital equipment including parts and consumables for smartphone manufacturing and service/repair for a period of 15 years," Sitharaman added. Apple sees big potential in India. The company’s CEO paid his maiden visit to the nation last year and expressed desires to bolster the company’s business in the country. Even though India remains one of the few places that has shown strong iPhone sales, there is no easy way for Apple to continue the momentum. For one, more than 50 percent of iPhones sold in the nation last year were iPhone 5s models. The four-year-old iPhone sells for under $300 in the country. Analysts say the company needs to lower the prices of the iPhone, which are higher in India due to domestic import laws. Apple's solution of sorts was to try to convince the Indian government to permit sales of refurbished iPhones — a proposal India was quick to discard.  Now Apple’s biggest bet at making iPhones affordable (and possibly to get India to say yes to refurbished iPhones) is if it could start manufacturing locally.  The Indian government offers various benefits to overseas companies to setup manufacturing plants in India as such efforts help in creation of new jobs and foster the development of cities and states.  Mashable was first to report about Apple’s plans to manufacture iPhone SE in India starting as early as April. It appears Apple will have to make do with the same usual incentives that other international brands get. WATCH: You can now take selfies... with your feet?

You’re not as secure online as you might think

You’re not as secure online as you might think

The problem with our grasp of cybersecurity isn’t so much that we remain dangerously illiterate — it’s that we think we know what we’re doing anyway. The Pew Research Center was a little more diplomatic than that, though, in characterizing the findings of a new survey of Americans’ understanding of online security. “Many Americans are unclear about some key cybersecurity topics, terms and concepts,” wrote Kenneth Olmstead and Aaron Smith in their introduction to “What the Public Knows About Cybersecurity.” But it’s that thinking that probably leads many internet users to make choices that they think make them more secure, but, in reality, leave them as exposed as ever.

LinkedIn is getting a Facebook-like feature

LinkedIn is getting a Facebook-like feature

LinkedIn has a content problem, although not quite the content problem you might think. For LinkedIn, it’s a smart move, albeit a late one, given Facebook’s (FB) own Trending section has been available to users for well over two years now. In my own personal experience toggling between the two, I found the topics and news stories suggested by LinkedIn better catered to my interests and ultimately more useful.

You can now search for a doctor using emoji, because 2017 is sorrow

You can now search for a doctor using emoji, because 2017 is sorrow

Feeling heartburn? Just type ❤️. Zocdoc, an online service that helps you find doctors and schedule appointments, has revamped its search to be more user-friendly. It's calling the initiative "patient-powered search," and it's all about finding ways to help those in need speak naturally, according to the company's blog post. SEE ALSO: Google's new messaging app translates your voice into emoji  The revamp aims to address the "disconnect between medical speak and patients' own colloquial language—think 'gyno' not 'obstetrician-gynecologist.'" This also means you can search for doctors with emoji. There's 蠟 for allergies, ❤️ for heartburn and ✈️  for travel medicine. You can even use the   emoji to find and book with a gastroenterologist.  "We see it more as a fun addition to the experience, rather than a core feature of the product" a representative from Zocdoc said via email. Is this really necessary, though? The emojification of apps of every kind is far from new, and it's getting a bit ridiculous. While it's important especially in areas like health care to make experiences as user friendly as possible, we don't need Zocdoc to behave like our actual friends do. Forcing emoji into apps results in combinations like ☀️ for dermatologist and   for primary care physician—at which point, they're not even useful. Sorry Zocdoc, we give this one a . WATCH: Indulge your fear of heights with China's latest glass bridge

Jeff Bezos takes this massive robot for a ride

Jeff Bezos takes this massive robot for a ride

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos demonstrated this insane-looking, 13-foot-tall mechanical robot at the second annual MARS (Machine-Learning Automation, Robotics & Space Exploration) conference. The robot, called Method-2, is a product of Hankook Mirae Technology, a South Korean company. If you think it looks like something out of a sci-fi flick, that’s because the creator worked on major sci-fi films such as “Terminator” and “Transformers.” Bezos must have felt the same way, since he was quoted as saying “Why do I feel so much like Sigourney Weaver?” referencing the actress’s 1986 flick, “Aliens. ...

Why Apple announced its new iPad with such little fanfare

Why Apple announced its new iPad with such little fanfare

Apple (AAPL) just dropped a new iPad with all the excitement of an IRS audit. It feels like the company just woke up Tuesday morning and decided, “Hey, let’s announce a new iPad.” Instead of a flashy event like Apple usually holds when it debuts a new product, we simply got a press release. Apple’s new-ish iPad debuted with little fanfare.

David Pogue tested 47 pill-reminder apps to find the best

David Pogue tested 47 pill-reminder apps to find the best

You want to hear some numbers that’ll curl your toes? An estimated 187 million Americans (58%) are on at least one prescription drug. (Source: Network for Excellence in Health Innovation [NEIH]). 110 million prescriptions a year are never even picked up. (Source: CVS Pharmacies based on 2008 data.) Up to 50% of us don’t take our medicines as prescribed (wrong times, wrong amounts, wrong meds), according to NEIH. And roughly 125,000 Americans die every year as a result. (Source: Research cited by the then-US surgeon general in 2012.)

Google is making it easier to plan your night in or out

Google is making it easier to plan your night in or out

Google has updated its Android and iOS apps to make it easier to find what you want as fast as possible. Google (GOOG, GOOGL) wants to make searching the web on your smartphone a bit easier with new shortcuts for its Android, iOS and web apps. The shortcuts, which will appear just below the search bar in the Google app, will provide users with quick access to things like the weather, entertainment, places to eat and drink and sporting events in your area.

'Mass Effect: Andromeda' review: A sprawling space drama that struggles to stay on target

'Mass Effect: Andromeda' review: A sprawling space drama that struggles to stay on target

‘Mass Effect: Andromeda’ invites you to strap in for another space opera. “Space is big,” beloved author and interdimensional traveler Douglas Adams noted in his seminal towel-seller, “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.” “You just won’t believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big,” he wrote, hammering home the point that when it comes to bigness, even our new president has nothing on the universe. The team behind the blockbuster “Mass Effect” trilogy managed to capture the epic scope of the big unknown while keeping our eyes trained on the intimate interactions between characters, a space opera in its truest — and, in terms of video games, among its best — form.

Make your next purchase using these smart sunglasses

Make your next purchase using these smart sunglasses

Visa is testing a prototype that will let you use sunglasses to make purchases. A small NFC chip inside one of the arms will be linked to your Visa account. Instead of swiping your debit card, you would tap the payment terminal to make the transaction. Visa says the concept plays well into its tagline, “Everywhere you want to be.” Let’s just hope these shades don’t wind up where you don’t want them to be: lost. Source:  https://www.engadget.com/2017/03/14/visa-is-testing-nfc-sunglasses-that-can-pay-for-stuff/ More:

Say hi to Samsung Bixby, the new voice assistant in the Galaxy S8

Say hi to Samsung Bixby, the new voice assistant in the Galaxy S8

Samsung has a new voice. And it has world-changing ambitions. In the upcoming Galaxy S8, users will find an extra button on the left side of the phone, just below the volume controls. Pressing it will activate Bixby, Samsung's new voice assistant. Once activated, Bixby will help you navigate what's arguably the most sophisticated piece of technology you own — the smartphone in your hand. If Samsung gets its wish, though, Bixby will eventually do much more than just help you order Lyfts or set up complex calendar appointments. The long-term vision is for Bixby to act as a kind of uber-interface for all of Samsung's products: TVs, wearables, washing machines, even remote controls. SEE ALSO: Samsung Galaxy S8: all the leaks in one place Samsung designed Bixby with a specific goal in mind, one that veers away from its fellow voice assistants — Apple's Siri, Amazon's Alexa, Microsoft's Cortana and the Google Assistant. Those platforms were generally built to help users quickly perform common tasks ("Remind me to buy milk") and perform search queries ("What's the capital of Brazil?"). Bixby, on the other hand, is all about making the phone itself easier to use, replicating the functions of many apps with voice commands. Yes, Siri et al. already do that to a certain extent — you can easily set a reminder with your voice, for example — but the voice integration typically only handles the basics. The goal of Bixby is to voice-enable every single action in an app that you'd normally do via touch, starting with Samsung's apps. So, not just "set a reminder to buy pickles at 6 p.m., but "Set a reminder on my Shopping List to buy pickles at 6 p.m. and make it repeat every week, then share the list with my wife." Bixby speaks Injong Rhee, CTO of Samsung Mobile and the architect behind Bixby, says the voice assistant is nothing short of an "interface revolution," freeing users from hunting down hidden functionality within menus and hard-to-find screens. "Bixby is an intelligent user interface, emphasis... on 'interface,'" Rhee says. "A lot of agents are looking at being knowledgeable, meaning that you can ask questions like, 'Who's president of the U.S.?' A lot of these are glorified extensions of search. What we are doing with Bixby, and what Bixby is capable of doing, is developing a new interface to our devices." Bixby architect Injong Rhee, CTO of Samsung Mobile. Image: Pete Pachal/Mashable Although it makes its debut on the Galaxy S8, it will soon spread. Rhee sees the Bixby button eventually spreading to all kinds of smart-home devices, from TVs to refrigerators to air conditioners. "Anywhere there is an internet connection and a microphone, Bixby can be used," he says. "There is some technology in the device, but a lot of it lives in the cloud. That's why the range of devices goes beyond just a smartphone. It means it can be in any device we produce." Samsung began work on Bixby about 18 months ago, Rhee says. It grew out of the company's S Voice tool, which has been on Samsung phones since 2012. (The timing might explain why Samsung's smart fridge — announced right around then — failed to deliver on its planned integration with Alexa.) S Voice hadn't progressed much over the years, but then last year Samsung acquired the much-hyped Viv Labs and its sophisticated assistant, a strong indicator of the company's renewed interest in voice control. However, Rhee says Viv's technology is planned for future updates to Bixby and doesn't have a role in the initial release. The name Bixby came out of Samsung's focus groups, but it was actually their third choice overall. It was the top pick among millennials — a demographic the company is specifically targeting with the Galaxy S8 — so it won out. (Rhee declined to say what the other names were.) It's also distinctive enough, with hard consonants, for it to work well as an activation word. Bixby, which will initially speak just English and Korean, is intended to be a user's "bright sidekick," helping them navigate their devices in a more natural way. "[What came before], it's been people trying to learn how the machine interacts with the world, but... it should be the machine learns how the human interacts with the world," Rhee says. "The learning curve shouldn't be steep." All talk, all action For an app to be considered Bixby-supported, every possible touch action needs to be mapped to a voice command. Rhee explains that, for a typical app, there are about 300 different actions the user can perform. That doesn't sound too bad until you consider there are around 15,000 different ways to perform them. And the ways to verbalize those actions number in the millions. That's a lot of stuff to map out. Still, Samsung says it's up for the challenge, at least as far as its built-in apps are concerned. But what about third-party apps? Considering the amount of development work, will Snapchat or Facebook ever work as well with Bixby as Samsung's apps? Rhee says Samsung has a plan to get third-party apps talking to Bixby, and an SDK to be released at a later date will introduce tools that make the mapping much easier. He also suggests Viv's technology can help here, too. "Viv Labs is coming in by way expanding our vision into third-party ecosystems. It doesn't necessarily have to be all of the touch commands that they can perform. At a minimum, [Bixby will perform] the basic functionalities: like the settings, or changing the language from English to French." On the Galaxy S8, a total of 10 apps will be Bixby-supported, Rhee says, with a second "wave" coming a few weeks later. Out of the gate, users will be able to use Bixby with Contacts, Gallery, Settings, Camera, Reminders and a few others. Another way Bixby is different from its peers: it will be aware of what you're doing on the phone and suggest different actions depending on what's on screen. So if you press the button while, say, looking at a single photo in the Gallery, editing and sharing controls are probably more relevant to you than searching. And if Bixby doesn't understand every aspect of a complex command, it will take you as far as it can rather than just hitting you with a "Sorry, I didn't catch that." All this "awareness" brings up an important question: How much data is Samsung collecting about you? Rhee says most user-specific data is kept on the device, but, as a cloud service, Bixby needs to store some information in the cloud. It's not yet clear what the exact breakdown is. The button Having a dedicated button for Bixby brings a number of advantages. For starters, it means Samsung won't have any need for Clippy-style pop-ups directing users to the assistant — people will inevitably find it on their own. It also ensures there will be far fewer accidental activations than if Bixby were mixed into a home button — something users of Siri are all too familiar with. "We actually have done a lot of research to have the Bixby button as part of the home button like our friends in Cupertino," Rhee says. "A lot of people find it a little awkward to use it in public. The home button is a very overloaded place — there's a lot of functionality into it. Having a dedicated button really removes a lot of friction." And since the idea is to press and hold, lifting your finger when you're done, Bixby will know definitively when you're done speaking. Still, there will also be a wake-up phrase — you can just say "Hi Bixby," to activate the assistant at any time. It's the dedicated button that really epitomizes Samsung's approach, and if it indeed ends up on all Samsung products, Bixby will become much more than just a smartphone assistant — it'll become the gateway for Samsung to finally, truly become a major player in the internet of things. Sure, Samsung has had its "Smart" devices for a long time, and its low-power Tizen OS is ideal for powering the many products with connections to the internet. It also acquired SmartThings in 2014 to strengthen its IoT brand. But until now, Samsung has lacked a gateway for its customers to really take advantage of that interconnectivity. For most, it's hard work hunting down the right settings on your phone to connect a smart TV to an air conditioner, but what if you could just tell Bixby to do it? And if you can talk to it from all those devices — asking any question or even making phone calls — then you're really onto something. "It's actually omnipresent in a sense," Rhee says. "Even if I speak to Bixby in, say, a washing machine, you can still do a lot of things that you do on your phone. For instance, you can say, 'Bixby, send a text to my friend Michael,' or 'Make a phone call.' That's the vision." The more capable assistant Amazon and Google already know this, and the success of Alexa and buzz around Home are a testament to the unquestionable efficiency of adding voice control to devices. But Samsung, with its high standard of controlling all functions of a device via Bixby, might end up with the advantage. Alexa, for all of its "skills," often falls short of full control (you can turn on or dim LED lights, for example, but might not be able to select specific colors), so the market has room for a more capable competitor. Of course, how and when Bixby will mix with third-party products and services remains an open question. "Philosophically, what we are looking at is revolutionizing phone interfaces," Rhee says. "We understand our applications better than anybody else out there — that's why we started with our own technology, but going forward we have plans to work with our partners." Eventually, Rhee says a Bixby app might come to non-Samsung Android phones and even iOS, possibly partnering with Google Assistant for search-related queries (though he cautions Google and Samsung haven't "gotten to the specifics" on how that would work). At the same time, Bixby control could extend to all kinds of smart products, not just Samsung ones. That would probably take a level of cooperation with competitors that Samsung hasn't really shown before, but if Bixby becomes ubiquitous in the long term, whatever OS this or that device is running will become less relevant. That's a future Samsung is clearly hoping for, since software has traditionally been its weakness. Samsung may be a chief Android partner, but it's struggled to differentiate its many services from Google's, and the company lacks an OS of its own (Tizen notwithstanding). Samsung's browser, Samsung Pay, S Health — they're all duplicates of Google products, and are widely regarded as inferior. That's why Bixby may be the best thing to happen to Samsung software in a long time. If customers respond, Bixby could, in the long term, finally get Samsung users to think of its phones as Samsung phones rather than just the best-performing Android phones on the market. All Android vendors try to differentiate to some extent, but Bixby's app-simplifying skills and potential IoT capabilities are a compelling sell. Bixby represents an important step for Samsung when it comes to services: finally a good answer to "Why should I use your software?" Effortless voice control of everything — not just your phone — is a tantalizing promise, and if Samsung can pull it off in the long term, its "bright sidekick" might end up being the only assistant we actually want to talk to. WATCH: Samsung's wireless earbuds double as a fitness-tracker

The 8 features we want in the iPhone 8

The 8 features we want in the iPhone 8

Apple’s next iPhone needs to be more than your average update. Apple’s (AAPL) next iPhone is always an absurdly important product for the tech giant. No matter how well the company’s services arms — Apple Music, iCloud, etc. — perform, the iPhone is Apple’s make-or-break product.

A 2-minute tour of this year's South by Southwest Conference

A 2-minute tour of this year's South by Southwest Conference

For one big week in March every year, Austin, Texas is overrun by culture and tech. Now, SXSW has some elements in common with other festivals. This year, the speakers included Joe Biden, Ryan Gosling, Ryan Reynolds, Garth Brooks, Buzz Aldrin, Melissa McCarthy, James Franco and Seth Rogan, Charlize Theron, and plenty more.

7 ways Facebook tried to copy Snapchat

7 ways Facebook tried to copy Snapchat

For all its ingenuity, Facebook (FB) still has one serious achilles heel: Snap (SNAP). Ever since Snap reportedly spurned a $3 billion acquisition offer from Facebook back in 2013, the social network has unleashed a slew of features and services that appear to be inspired by Snapchat’s core mission of ephemeral messaging or based upon a particular Snapchat feature. Just last week, Facebook rolled out a Messenger Day, a new Snapchat Stories-like feature that lets Messenger users string together a series of photos and video, apply layers of texts and filters, and show them off atop the Messenger app.

China's police are now shooting down drones with radio-jamming rifles

China's police are now shooting down drones with radio-jamming rifles

A Chinese city's police department is arming itself with more than 20 drone-jamming rifles to crack down on illegal drone flights. SEE ALSO: Use Jedi mind tricks to command this drone Police in Wuhan, central China , are going to be equipped with 20 of these rifles, which work by emitting radio signals that force the drones to land purportedly without damaging them. Image: Weibo The drone-killing rifles will be used during the upcoming 2017 Wuhan Marathon, to raise security. Image: WEIBO Wuhan police demonstrated the drone-killing rifles last week, where they shot down six drones, according to the Chutian Metropolitan Daily.  The rifles don't come cheap, at 250,000 yuan ($36,265) each, and they will have a range of roughly 1 km (0.6 miles). Image: Weibo Unauthorised drone flights have disrupted airport safety in China, as well as large-scale events, according to the Wuhan police. Earlier this year, a drone pilot in Hangzhou was arrested for flying a DJI Mavic Pro dangerously near civilian airliners. And in Hong Kong, three operators were arrested for flying a drone over a Formula E event. Operators of drones that are more than 7kg have to be licensed, according to draft law issued by the Civil Aviation Administration of China in 2015. Rules are generally more relaxed in rural China than in urban, built-up areas, but drones must keep out of restricted airspace and follow rules set by the military and the government.  The new rules also forbid deliveries made by drone in built-up, urban areas, and require all drones to register to their place of manufacture, weight and maximum altitude before they are allowed to take off. WATCH: Flame-throwing drones make for badass trash removers

Silicon Valley’s favorite sneaker has a wear-and-tear problem

Silicon Valley’s favorite sneaker has a wear-and-tear problem

Allbirds’s Wool Runner sneakers are a hit among tech workers. Walk the streets, halls and open offices of Silicon Valley, and you’ll notice many tech workers wearing them: Allbirds’s Wool Runner sneakers. “Wearing Allbirds is like wearing slippers everywhere,” said one startup founder, who likes the comfort they offer because of the materials used and relative lack of structure.

Two fake news writers reveal how they ply their trade

Two fake news writers reveal how they ply their trade

Fake news writers Jestin Coler (center) and Jeffrey Marty (left) speak at SXSW. AUSTIN — A keynote offering a sometimes-uncomfortable perspective on fake news at the South by Southwest Conference here started with a pitch suggesting a different story. The description below a generic title on the conference’s website for Tuesday’s talk by Yasmin Green, director of research at Google’s Jigsaw project, implied she’d speak about countering the radicalization of at-risk audiences.

This high-tech workout bag cleans itself

This high-tech workout bag cleans itself

This gym bag does more than carry your smelly workout clothes. With the push of a button, Paqsule will deodorize, sanitize and kill bacteria to keep everything inside clean and smelling fresh. The company that makes it says its PaqTech system is chemical free, and uses UV and O3 (activated oxygen) to zap bacteria. The device has a rechargeable battery with 72 hours of cleaning life, and can be used to charge your cellphone or tablet. If you want to get your hands on Paqsule, check out its Kickstarter project at Kickstarter.com. More:

How to avoid falling for email scams

How to avoid falling for email scams

Early one Sunday morning, my editor, Yahoo Finance’s Erin Fuchs, checked her personal email and was surprised to find a message from PayPal (PYPL). It doesn’t matter who you are or what email service you use. If you have an email account, you’ve received some kind of scam, or phishing email, just like my editor.

Twitter accounts hijacked with 'Nazi' hashtags in Turkish

Twitter accounts hijacked with 'Nazi' hashtags in Turkish

By Eric Auchard FRANKFURT (Reuters) - A diplomatic spat between Turkey, the Netherlands and Germany spread online on Wednesday when a large number of Twitter accounts were hijacked and replaced with anti-Nazi messages in Turkish. The attacks, using the hashtags #Nazialmanya (NaziGermany) or #Nazihollanda (NaziHolland), took over accounts of high-profile CEOs, publishers, government agencies, politicians and also some ordinary Twitter users. Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan has accused the German and Dutch governments of Nazi-style tactics, drawing protests from both countries, after Turkish government ministers were barred from addressing political rallies there to boost his support among expatriate Turks.

How ‘video understanding’ could transform Facebook

How ‘video understanding’ could transform Facebook

Understanding video is a multi-year challenge Facebook argues could transform the social network experience for the better. Facebook (FB) users spend over 100 million hours a day gobbling up video on the social network. A photo is one static image, but a video is essentially copious images sequenced in a particular order to show a narrative in motion: a Siamese kitten purring or a professor in the middle of a BBC interview interrupted by his two young kids.

The car of the future debuts at SXSW

The car of the future debuts at SXSW

Here’s a sneak peek at what we could be driving around in 2020. The startup Nio debuted the Eve at SXSW. This futuristic self-driving machine does more than just drive – it has an artificial intelligence engine called Nomi that acts like a personal assistant, and can understand and talk to its passengers. Nio has sliding glass digital doors and an interior that displays data to passengers. The cabin is more like a living room, with reclining seats and folding tables. ...

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Trump decides yes, he can stay mad at Freedom Caucus for health care defeat

Trump decides yes, he can stay mad at Freedom Caucus for health care defeat

President Trump did not blame House Republicans for failing to pass the bill to repeal and replace Obamacare after it was abruptly pulled. “Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!” Trump tweeted early Sunday. Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!

Gold coin worth $4 million stolen from Berlin museum

Gold coin worth $4 million stolen from Berlin museum

A Canadian gold coin named "Big Maple Leaf" which bears the image of Queen Elizabeth II was stolen in the early hours of Monday morning from Berlin's Bode Museum. Given the high purity of the gold used in the coin, its material value is estimated to be $4 million. The museum said on its website that the coin was issued by the Royal Canadian Mint in 2007 and that it was featured in the Guinness Book of Records for its "unmatched" degree of purity.

Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrike

Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrike

WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. counterterrorism airstrike earlier this month in Afghanistan killed an al-Qaida leader responsible for a deadly hotel attack in Islamabad in 2008 and the 2009 attack on a bus carrying the Sri Lankan cricket team, the Pentagon said Saturday.

New York skyscrapers adapt to climate change

New York skyscrapers adapt to climate change

With a skyline crowded with ever-more luxury towers, the construction of another Manhattan skyscraper wouldn't normally be remarkable. Planned just after deadly Hurricane Sandy ravaged New York in October 2012 -- sounding another alarm about the mounting effects of climate change -- it was designed with new threats in mind, reflecting how the real estate world is evolving to account for global warming, in contrast to President Donald Trump's moves to roll back environmental protection. The huge storm killed more than 40 people in New York, paralyzing the US financial capital for days.

Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?

Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?

Infowars owner and long-time conspiracy theorist Alex Jones admitted that his site falsely reported and commented on the debunked “Pizzagate” controversy, a theory that alleged that Comet Ping Pong, a Washington, D.C., pizza restaurant, had played a role in a child-sex-trafficking ring that also involved Hillary Clinton. Apologizing to the restaurant’s owner, James Alefantis, Mr. Jones issued a statement Friday. “I want our viewers and listeners to know that we regret any negative impact our commentaries may have had on Mr. Alefantis, Comet Ping Pong, or its employees,” he said.

Florida man kills one, wounds five in 'horrific' shooting: police

Florida man kills one, wounds five in 'horrific' shooting: police

A man killed his girlfriend and wounded five other people, including two children and a high school student at a bus stop, during a shooting spree in central Florida on Monday, police said. Police say Allen D. Cashe opened fire a few hours after officers had been called to break up a dispute over a vehicle between him and his girlfriend, who was not identified. Cashe, 31, killed the girlfriend and critically wounded her two sons, ages 7 and 8, and her father, Sanford Police spokeswoman Bianca Gillett said.

The 8 best new features Apple added to your iPhone in iOS 10.3

The 8 best new features Apple added to your iPhone in iOS 10.3

After releasing roughly 437 different iOS 10.3 betas to developers over the past few weeks alone, Apple has finally released iOS 10.3 to the public. The new mobile software is available as an over the air (OTA) download or as a download through iTunes on a Mac or Windows PC, and it's compatible with 19 different Apple devices dating as far back as the iPhone 5, 4th-generation iPad, iPad mini 2, and the 6th-generation iPod touch. Should you be excited? Should you rush to download and install iOS 10.3 on your iPhone or iPad as soon as possible? In this post, we'll run through all of the top new features Apple introduced in iOS 10.3. Find My AirPods: The most talked-about new feature in iOS 10.3 is Find My AirPods, which obviously only matters if you own a pair of Apple's hot new AirPods. They're still next to impossible to find in Apple stores, so Amazon is really your only hope if you want AirPods anytime soon. There's now a new option in the Find My iPhone app that can track down your AirPods, but it's nowhere near as accurate or as useful as it is for iPhones and iPads since AirPods don't have a GPS radio or the ability to connect to any networks. Instead, this is basically a log that will show you the last location where your iPhone was connected to your AirPods. If you forget your AirPods somewhere, this nifty new feature could definitely help you find them. If you haven't connected to them in a while or if they're stolen, you're pretty much out of luck. App Transition Animations: You might not even notice this one, but Apple made a subtle change to the transition animations that are shown as apps open and close in iOS 10.3. They now have slightly more rounded edges, which is definitely not a big deal. But they also seem to move a bit faster, which is a big deal since it speeds up the interface a bit. Weather in Maps: In the Maps app, users can now 3D Touch the weather icon to see a local forecast for the area. Apple ID Profile: There is now a new Apple ID profile section in the Settings app that you'll see at the very top of the first screen. It gives you access to a single page where you'll find your full contact profile, security settings, payment information, iCloud account details, App Store settings, Family Sharing settings and a bit more. Also of note, this page displays every Apple device where you're currently signed in. iCloud Storage: You'll now find a new section at the top of your iCloud settings page with a breakdown of how your iCloud storage is being used. New File System: This is a big one, though it takes place completely behind the scenes so you won't even realize it's happening. Installing iOS 10.3 will automatically update your iPhone or iPad to use Apple File System (APFS) instead of HFS+. APFS is better optimized for NAND flash storage so files can be accessed more quickly, and it also supports stronger encryption. Voice Call Continuity for Verizon: This is obviously a new feature that will only be appreciated by Verizon Wireless subscribers, but iCloud calling features are now finally supported if you use Verizon. That means you can make or receive voice calls on your Mac, iPad, iPod touch, and Apple Watch. Podcasts Widget: You know that widgets panel you never use? There's a new Podcasts widget available now (it's actually a pretty cool addition for podcast fans).

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

A 6,800-ton South Korean ferry was hoisted to the surface last week nearly three years after it capsized and sank in violent seas off the country's southwestern coast, an emotional moment for the nation as it searches for closure to one of its deadliest disasters. More than 300 people — most of whom were students on a high school trip — died when the Sewol sank on April 16, 2014, touching off an outpouring of national grief and soul searching about long-ignored public safety and regulatory failures.

Northeast Australia braces for cyclone, thousands flee to higher ground

Northeast Australia braces for cyclone, thousands flee to higher ground

By Tom Westbrook SYDNEY (Reuters) - Thousands of Australians fled their homes on Monday as a powerful cyclone bore down on coastal towns in Queensland, where authorities urged 30,000 people to evacuate low lying areas most at risk from tidal surges and winds of up to 300 km per hour (185 mph). Cyclone Debbie is expected to gather strength before making landfall in the northeast state early on Tuesday, with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology forecasting a category four storm, just one rung below the most dangerous wind speed level. The growing alarm persuaded the state government on Monday to warn some 25,000 people living in parts of Mackay, a city 950 kilometers (590 miles) north of the state capital Brisbane, to head south to higher ground.

Photos of the day - March 26, 2017

Photos of the day - March 26, 2017

A man waves traditional daggers, or jambiyas, as he attends with supporters of the Houthi movement and Yemen’s former president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, a rally to mark the two-year anniversary since the military intervention by a Saudi-led coalition, in Sanaa, Yemen; police officers detain an opposition supporter during a rally in Vladivostok, Russia; Balinese people carry giant effigies in the form of the devil, whose local name is “Ogoh-ogoh,” during a parade before Nyepi Day, the Balinese Day of Silence, marking the Balinese Hindu New Year in Gianyar, a regency in Bali, Indonesia. ...

Ted Koppel to Sean Hannity: You’re bad for America

Ted Koppel to Sean Hannity: You’re bad for America

Ted Koppel says Fox News host Sean Hannity is bad for America. On “CBS Sunday Morning,” the veteran newsman told Hannity that the audience he attracts is unable to distinguish between the divisive political rhetoric that marked the 2016 presidential campaign and the truth. “You have attracted people who are determined that ideology is more important than facts,” Koppel told Hannity.

Brazil tainted meat: Three key markets resume imports

Brazil tainted meat: Three key markets resume imports

Brasília (AFP) - Brazil won a major victory Saturday in the fight to restore credibility amid a tainted meat scandal, with key markets China, Egypt and Chile lifting their bans on its products. The three countries, which had totally closed their markets to Brazilian meat at the beginning of the week, said they would open them to all but imports from the 21 Brazilian processing plants under investigation. About 20 countries this week -- including the European Union, Japan and Mexico -- closed fully or partially their doors to Brazilian meat imports, whose sales brought in more than $13 billion to the Brazilian economy in 2016.

With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

When Singapore’s first prime minister, Lee Kuan Yew, passed away in 2015, 16-year-old Amos Yee made an obscenity-filled YouTube video denouncing the late leader as a “tyrant.” That and other postings earned him a four-week jail sentence for “wounding religious feelings and obscenity.” Not long after, he earned another six-week sentence for derogatory comments on Islam and Christianity. On Friday, US Immigration Judge Samuel B. Cole granted asylum to Mr. Yee, now 18, who flew to Chicago in December. “His prosecution, detention, and general maltreatment at the hands of the Singapore authorities constitute persecution,” Judge Cole ruled.

Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

When it was released last fall, Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 was the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. Unfortunately though, the Galaxy Note 7 was literally the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. A poor battery design caused dozens of phones to explode while being charged — and in some cases, while unplugged and in use — causing property damage and even injuring some users in the process. As a result, Samsung was forced to issue an unprecedented global recall, asking everyone around the world who purchased the phone to return or exchange it as soon as possible. Most of the potentially destructive smartphones have been collected by now. Since the phone was so impressive, however, a small percentage of holdouts have refused to give up their precious Note 7 handsets. We're not sure why Samsung waited as long as it did, but the company is finally taking its final step in ensuring that the Note 7 cannot do anymore damage. According to South Korean news site Yonhap News, Samsung will take steps next week to completely disable any remaining Galaxy Note 7 smartphones that may still be in use. The company said some time ago that 97% of all Note 7 phones have been reclaimed by the company. With more than 1 million handsets sold before Samsung discontinued the phone, however, that leaves tens of thousands of Note 7 handsets still in users' hands. According to the report, Samsung plans to issue a mandatory software update that will completely prevent any remaining Galaxy Note 7 devices from holding a charge. As a result, the phones will no longer be able to power on unless they are plugged in. Samsung and its carrier partners issued a similar software update in the US late last year and in early 2017, and now any remaining markets where the Note 7 might still be in use will get the update. Diehard Samsung fans who were holding onto their Note 7 phones won't have to wait very long before their soon-to-be crippled Note 7 phones are replaced. Samsung will unveil its new Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ flagship phones on Wednesday, and they'll be released about a month later.

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago

The medieval man was buried along with hundreds of others in a graveyard underneath what is now the Old Divinity School building of St. John's College at the University of Cambridge, in the United Kingdom. By studying his remains and piecing together his facial features and biological history, archeologists said they hope to understand the lives of anonymous poor people in the 13th century. "Most historical records are about well-off people and especially their financial and legal transactions," study lead researcher John Robb, a professor of archaeology at the University of Cambridge, said in a statement.

Iran strikes back at US with 'reciprocal' sanctions

Iran strikes back at US with 'reciprocal' sanctions

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran on Sunday sanctioned what it described as 15 American companies, alleging they support terrorism, repression and Israel's occupation of land Palestinians want for a future state, likely in retaliation for sanctions earlier announced by the U.S.

United Airlines bars teenage girls in leggings from flight

United Airlines bars teenage girls in leggings from flight

"The passengers this morning were United pass riders who were not in compliance with our dress code policy for company benefit travel," the airline said on Twitter as the incident Thanwent viral on social media. In another tweet made in response to a question from a social media user, the airline said: "Casual attire for ticketed passengers is fine. United pass travelers are company employees or family members of employees.

Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains

Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Golf ball-sized hail and powerful winds are expected to roll through parts of the Southern Plains late Sunday, marking the latest round of turbulent weather across the Midwest and South, forecasters said.

Seven students, one teacher killed in Japan avalanche

Seven students, one teacher killed in Japan avalanche

An avalanche Monday killed seven Japanese high school students and a teacher on a mountain-climbing outing, and injured 40 more. More than 100 troops were deployed in a major rescue mission after the avalanche hit ski slopes in Tochigi prefecture north of Tokyo. A total of 52 students and 11 teachers from seven high schools were on a three-day mountaineering expedition when disaster struck.

Syrian rebels resume withdrawal from last Homs bastion: monitor

Syrian rebels resume withdrawal from last Homs bastion: monitor

Hundreds of rebels left their last bastion in Syria's Homs city on Monday, resuming an evacuation expected to be among the largest of its kind under a Russian-backed deal with the government, state media and a monitor said. Heavy fighting between rebel groups and the army further north in Hama province over the weekend had delayed their departure from the city's al-Waer district, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. The evacuation began last week with the Syrian government shuttling hundreds of people from the district in Homs, which was an early center of the 2011 uprising that spiraled into war.

Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

This past Friday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk dashed the hopes and dreams of prospective Model 3 owners with just a few simple tweets. Tempering expectations, Musk emphasized that Tesla's upcoming Model 3 will not be more advanced -- in any capacity -- than the company's flagship Model S. "Model 3 is just a smaller, more affordable version of Model S [with] less range & power & fewer features," Musk said. "Model S has more advanced technology." Musk later added that the Model 3 will not feature the elegant "auto extend handles" Tesla introduced on the Model S. While Muks's comments here might seem obvious, the reality is that some of the hype and speculation surrounding the Model 3 had reached bizarre levels in recent months. Case in point: because the Model 3 prototype Tesla unveiled last year lacked an instrument panel with traditional gauges for items like speed, range and other pertinent information, many Tesla enthusiasts began wondering if Tesla had some special plan for the dashboard, with many believing that a heads up display (HUD) on the windshield was an inevitability. As a quick reminder, here's a photo of the Model 3 interior taken from the company's special event last year. As is evident below, the only location a driver can access information is the 15-inch touchscreen in the center console. In another shot, we can see that Model 3 drivers will have to divert their eyes to the upper left hand corner of the display in order to ascertain their current speed. Alas, Tesla doesn't have any secret plans to implement some advanced HUD on the Model 3. In a tweet addressing the matter, Musk said that as cars become more autonomous, the need for a suite of information at the ready becomes less of an issue. https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/845285846936825856 Still, we're still a long ways off before fully self driving cars become commonplace. In turn, it remains to be seen if the Model 3 design in its current incarnation is perhaps too far ahead of its time. Besides, autonomous driving features for the Model 3 will cost extra, meaning that not every Model 3 on the road will be able to take advantage of the vehicle's self-driving capabilities. One question about the Model 3 that remains unanswered is whether or not can expect any changes to the car's steering wheel design. This past April, Musk boasted that the final design will be akin to a spaceship. https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/716729420078133248 To answer that, we'll probably have to wait until next July when Tesla is planning the next phase of its Model 3 reveal.

Washington's cherry blossoms bloom despite cold snap

Washington's cherry blossoms bloom despite cold snap

A mild winter followed by a spate of cold weather in Washington, made its mark on the city’s cherry blossoms, but the annual festival delighted first-time visitors on Sunday. The cherry blossom trees were a gift from Japan to the United States in 1912. The cherry blossom trees currently grow in three National Park Service locations, including the Tidal Basin, Hains Point and on the Washington Monument grounds.

Bulgarian center-right GERB wins most votes in election

Bulgarian center-right GERB wins most votes in election

By Tsvetelia Tsolova and Angel Krasimirov SOFIA (Reuters) - Bulgaria's center-right GERB party narrowly won a parliamentary election on Sunday, giving it a chance to form another government after leader Boiko Borisov resigned as prime minister in November, triggering the snap poll. The GERB party won 33 percent of the vote, the Balkan country's third in just 4 years, with the leftist Socialists trailing on 27.2 percent, partial official results with 26 percent of the ballots counted showed. "The result of the vote shows that GERB is obliged to form a government," said Borisov.

Family of missing ex-FBI agent files lawsuit against Iran

Family of missing ex-FBI agent files lawsuit against Iran

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The family of a former FBI agent who went missing in Iran a decade ago on an unauthorized CIA assignment has filed a lawsuit against the Islamic Republic, accusing it of using "cold, cynical and false denials" to torture his loved ones.

Why is Colorado risking hundreds of millions to protect its marijuana industry?

Why is Colorado risking hundreds of millions to protect its marijuana industry?

Colorado's state legislature is considering an unusual plan to defend the state's marijuana industry from a federal crackdown under the Trump administration. The bill would allow growers and sellers to reclassify their recreational marijuana as medical “based on a business need due to a change in local, state, or federal law or enforcement policy.” The strategy is meant to keep marijuana businesses afloat if the federal government comes after them, even if it means the state losing hundreds of millions of dollars in taxes. The bill represents a shift in how states might respond to what marijuana advocates say are an over-simplification of cannabis policy by the Trump administration.

5 Easy Ways to Make Fast Cash

5 Easy Ways to Make Fast Cash

For aluminum cans, you'll generally get 40 cents per pound, and maybe 50 cents a pound if you bring in 100 pounds or more. If you have old computer equipment, you could also recycle that for money -- not much, though.

Cities and monuments switch off for Earth Hour

Cities and monuments switch off for Earth Hour

The Empire State Building and United Nations headquarters in New York joined other iconic buildings and monuments around the world plunging into darkness for sixty minutes on Saturday to mark Earth Hour and draw attention to climate change. The Eiffel Tower, the Kremlin, the Acropolis in Athens and Sydney's Opera House also dimmed their lights as millions of people from some 170 countries and territories were expected to take part in Earth Hour, the annual bid to highlight global warming caused by the burning of coal, oil and gas to drive cars and power plants.

White House threatens to bypass hardline conservatives on tax reform

White House threatens to bypass hardline conservatives on tax reform

By Lindsay Dunsmuir and Doina Chiacu WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Fresh off a defeat on U.S. healthcare legislation, the White House warned rebellious conservative lawmakers that they should get behind President Donald Trump's agenda or he may bypass them on future legislative fights, including tax reform. The threat by White House chief of staff Reince Priebus to build a broad coalition on tax reform that could include moderate Democrats came as the Republican head of the tax-writing committee in the House of Representatives said he hoped to move a tax bill through his panel this spring. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady said his committee had been working on tax reform in parallel with the failed healthcare reform push.

Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

Anyone who's played a futuristic shooter since the dawn of video games knows that when you see something called a "railgun" you're in for a real treat. Well, the US Navy built a railgun of its very own, and it just showed off its remarkably powerful creation in a new video of its test firing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=106&v=Pi-BDIu_umo Railguns like the one the Navy has built trade chemical propellants like gunpowder for the sheer power of electricity, generating extremely strong magnetic fields to push a projectile down a set of rails and out the end of the barrel. It might not sound particularly efficient, but the speeds that railgun projectiles can achieve put traditional cannons to shame. The Navy's massive weapon, for example, launches its rounds at a whopping 4,500 mph. Additionally, the projectiles launched by the railgun do their damage not by exploding, but simply by striking their target while moving at such a high speed, quite literally tearing apart anything they come into contact with. For most of their history, railguns have been more fiction than science, and their practicality and reliability has repeatedly been questioned over time. The size of the device itself is typically massive, owing to the large and complex electronic components required to supply the necessary power. However, there are also some pretty fantastic benefits of the non-explosive rounds, such as much less chance of unexploded ordnance causing problems either on the ship or vehicle firing the weapon, or on the battlefield after a skirmish has ended.

One killed in shooting on Las Vegas Strip, suspect surrenders

One killed in shooting on Las Vegas Strip, suspect surrenders

One person was killed Saturday and another wounded in a shooting on a bus on the busy Las Vegas strip, police said, with a suspect later surrendering himself to authorities. Police closed a section of South Las Vegas Boulevard for hours after the shooting as a standoff unfolded with the suspect, who had barricaded himself on the bus. "The suspect in the bus has surrendered to officers, and is in custody," the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department said on its Twitter account.

Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against Assad

Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against Assad

By Tom Miles GENEVA (Reuters) - The Syrian opposition rejects terrorism and is "fed up" with banned militants but they cannot be stopped if Syria continues evicting populations of besieged areas, opposition negotiator Basma Kodmani said on Sunday. Syria's government has always cited the fight against terrorism to justify its part in a six-year war that has killed hundreds of thousands, and brands all its opponents and their backers as terrorists and sponsors of terror. The opposition's chief negotiator Nasr al-Hariri, who is trying to negotiate an end the rule of President Bashar al-Assad, began this month by saying its stance against terrorism was proven on the battlefield and not mere words.

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People

The research used detailed brain scans to compare the brains of people who were blind to the brains of people who were not blind. Such brain changes arise because the brain has a "plastic" quality, meaning that it can make new connections among neurons, the study said. "Even in the case of being profoundly blind, the brain rewires itself in a manner to use the information at its disposal so that it can interact with the environment in a more effective manner," senior study author Dr. Lotfi Merabet, the director of the Laboratory for Visual Neuroplasticity at Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, said in a statement.

Photos of the day - March 25, 2017

Photos of the day - March 25, 2017

A woman dressed as “Europa" performs during a rally in Berlin marking the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome; a woman, pushed to the ground by police, tries to defends herself as the police detain an activist during an opposition rally in Minsk, Belarus; Pope Francis waves to the faithful from the Popemobile in Milan, Italy, as Cardinal Angelo Scola, the archbishop of Milan, looks on, after the Angelus in Duomo Square. These are some of the photos of the day. (AP/EPA/Getty/Reuters)

gadgets

Trump decides yes, he can stay mad at Freedom Caucus for health care defeat

Trump decides yes, he can stay mad at Freedom Caucus for health care defeat

President Trump did not blame House Republicans for failing to pass the bill to repeal and replace Obamacare after it was abruptly pulled. “Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!” Trump tweeted early Sunday. Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!

Gold coin worth $4 million stolen from Berlin museum

Gold coin worth $4 million stolen from Berlin museum

A Canadian gold coin named "Big Maple Leaf" which bears the image of Queen Elizabeth II was stolen in the early hours of Monday morning from Berlin's Bode Museum. Given the high purity of the gold used in the coin, its material value is estimated to be $4 million. The museum said on its website that the coin was issued by the Royal Canadian Mint in 2007 and that it was featured in the Guinness Book of Records for its "unmatched" degree of purity.

Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrike

Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrike

WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. counterterrorism airstrike earlier this month in Afghanistan killed an al-Qaida leader responsible for a deadly hotel attack in Islamabad in 2008 and the 2009 attack on a bus carrying the Sri Lankan cricket team, the Pentagon said Saturday.

Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?

Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?

Infowars owner and long-time conspiracy theorist Alex Jones admitted that his site falsely reported and commented on the debunked “Pizzagate” controversy, a theory that alleged that Comet Ping Pong, a Washington, D.C., pizza restaurant, had played a role in a child-sex-trafficking ring that also involved Hillary Clinton. Apologizing to the restaurant’s owner, James Alefantis, Mr. Jones issued a statement Friday. “I want our viewers and listeners to know that we regret any negative impact our commentaries may have had on Mr. Alefantis, Comet Ping Pong, or its employees,” he said.

Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains

Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Golf ball-sized hail and powerful winds are expected to roll through parts of the Southern Plains late Sunday, marking the latest round of turbulent weather across the Midwest and South, forecasters said.

Protests nationwide bring thousands to Russia's streets

Protests nationwide bring thousands to Russia's streets

Russia’s opposition, often written off by critics as a small and irrelevant coterie of privileged urbanites, put on an impressive nationwide show of strength Sunday with scores of protest rallies spanning the vast country. Hundreds were arrested, including Alexei Navalny, the anti-corruption campaigner who is President Vladimir Putin’s most prominent critic.

After United Airlines incident, women share stories of being shamed for their clothing

After United Airlines incident, women share stories of being shamed for their clothing

In response to United Airline's legging-gate, women are speaking out.  Two young girls wearing leggings were banned from a flight on Sunday morning due to a violation of the airline's internal dress code. The situation, which was live-tweeted by activist Shannon Watts, sparked outrage from thousands on social media who called out the company for policing the girls' attire.   Author Dana Schwartz was one of those that spoke out against United Airlines, and asked women on Twitter to share their stories of feeling "embarrassed" or "sexualized" for the first time because of what they wore.  SEE ALSO: United Airlines bans 2 girls with leggings from flight because they weren't 'properly clothed' Ladies, when was the first time you were made to feel embarrassed and sexualized for what you wore? I was in 5th grade, shorts too short. — Dana Schwartz (@DanaSchwartzzz) March 26, 2017 "It was the 2nd to last day of school. HOT out. I was a beanpole, everything was short on me. They made me call my mom to bring pants," she recalled. "AND THEN when you DO grow up you reach the fun point when you're embarrassed to go out with your dad in public bc people think you're dating," Schwartz explained.  These tweets sparked countless stories from women sharing similar experiences.  @DanaSchwartzzz "We must! We must! We must increase our bust! The bigger the better, the tighter the sweater, the boys depend on us!" (2) — RealMarjo (@RealMarjo) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz early example, though not the first: when my male boss told me (14) that I'd be really hot when I was 16 — Rani Molla (@ranimolla) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz 4th or 5th grade. Gray leggings were inappropriate. Nothing else was clean, but I didn't tell them that — Erin El Issa (@Erin_El_Issa) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz 5th grade: dance pants were too tight for school. 8th grade: friend & I wore matching tube socks & skirts. Forced to change. — Jordon Cloud Rahmil (@jordoncloud) March 26, 2017 In my HS girls had to wear oversized t-shirts that said "I violated the dress code" if tank tops/leggings/etc. were deemed "inappropriate" https://t.co/DC7KB4pnQ4 — Laura Wagner (@Laura_M_Wagner) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz 3rd grade. My arms are really long, and the hem of my shorts wasn't far enough down. — dan stevens real fan (@whas2001) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz at 14, was told small town moms were gossiping about me because I showed 1" of my midriff. hadn't even kissed a boy ever. — Alyssa Galella (@woodlandalyssa) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz I almost didn't get to partipate in my 8th grade graduation because my dress had straps that showed 2 much shoulder. 1981. pic.twitter.com/QXHnPNRZcV — Cami MacNamara (@webcami) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz I once heard a church mom ask my little sisters if they were going to "dress modest this summer, or like your sister Emily" — Emily Joy (@emilyjoypoetry) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz Age 10, end-of-year dance recital, they measured us at the beginning of the year & refused to let us wear bras for dance — TofuForBrains (@TofuForBrains) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz First day of high school sent home for wearing dress with thin straps that revealed I had no bra straps. Didn't need a bra! — MosaicMoods ☮️ (@DianaMaus) March 26, 2017 Carina MacKenzie summed up the majority of stories on the thread pretty succinctly:  @DanaSchwartzzz I honestly don't ever remember NOT feeling that way. — Carina MacKenzie (@cadlymack) March 26, 2017 WATCH: Airbus is redefining the future of flying.

One killed in shooting on Las Vegas Strip, suspect surrenders

One killed in shooting on Las Vegas Strip, suspect surrenders

One person was killed Saturday and another wounded in a shooting on a bus on the busy Las Vegas strip, police said, with a suspect later surrendering himself to authorities. Police closed a section of South Las Vegas Boulevard for hours after the shooting as a standoff unfolded with the suspect, who had barricaded himself on the bus. "The suspect in the bus has surrendered to officers, and is in custody," the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department said on its Twitter account.

Syrian rebels resume withdrawal from last Homs bastion: monitor

Syrian rebels resume withdrawal from last Homs bastion: monitor

Hundreds of rebels left their last bastion in Syria's Homs city on Monday, resuming an evacuation expected to be among the largest of its kind under a Russian-backed deal with the government, state media and a monitor said. Heavy fighting between rebel groups and the army further north in Hama province over the weekend had delayed their departure from the city's al-Waer district, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. The evacuation began last week with the Syrian government shuttling hundreds of people from the district in Homs, which was an early center of the 2011 uprising that spiraled into war.

Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

When it was released last fall, Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 was the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. Unfortunately though, the Galaxy Note 7 was literally the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. A poor battery design caused dozens of phones to explode while being charged — and in some cases, while unplugged and in use — causing property damage and even injuring some users in the process. As a result, Samsung was forced to issue an unprecedented global recall, asking everyone around the world who purchased the phone to return or exchange it as soon as possible. Most of the potentially destructive smartphones have been collected by now. Since the phone was so impressive, however, a small percentage of holdouts have refused to give up their precious Note 7 handsets. We're not sure why Samsung waited as long as it did, but the company is finally taking its final step in ensuring that the Note 7 cannot do anymore damage. According to South Korean news site Yonhap News, Samsung will take steps next week to completely disable any remaining Galaxy Note 7 smartphones that may still be in use. The company said some time ago that 97% of all Note 7 phones have been reclaimed by the company. With more than 1 million handsets sold before Samsung discontinued the phone, however, that leaves tens of thousands of Note 7 handsets still in users' hands. According to the report, Samsung plans to issue a mandatory software update that will completely prevent any remaining Galaxy Note 7 devices from holding a charge. As a result, the phones will no longer be able to power on unless they are plugged in. Samsung and its carrier partners issued a similar software update in the US late last year and in early 2017, and now any remaining markets where the Note 7 might still be in use will get the update. Diehard Samsung fans who were holding onto their Note 7 phones won't have to wait very long before their soon-to-be crippled Note 7 phones are replaced. Samsung will unveil its new Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ flagship phones on Wednesday, and they'll be released about a month later.

Northeast Australia braces for cyclone, thousands flee to higher ground

Northeast Australia braces for cyclone, thousands flee to higher ground

By Tom Westbrook SYDNEY (Reuters) - Thousands of Australians fled their homes on Monday as a powerful cyclone bore down on coastal towns in Queensland, where authorities urged 30,000 people to evacuate low lying areas most at risk from tidal surges and winds of up to 300 km per hour (185 mph). Cyclone Debbie is expected to gather strength before making landfall in the northeast state early on Tuesday, with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology forecasting a category four storm, just one rung below the most dangerous wind speed level. The growing alarm persuaded the state government on Monday to warn some 25,000 people living in parts of Mackay, a city 950 kilometers (590 miles) north of the state capital Brisbane, to head south to higher ground.

With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

When Singapore’s first prime minister, Lee Kuan Yew, passed away in 2015, 16-year-old Amos Yee made an obscenity-filled YouTube video denouncing the late leader as a “tyrant.” That and other postings earned him a four-week jail sentence for “wounding religious feelings and obscenity.” Not long after, he earned another six-week sentence for derogatory comments on Islam and Christianity. On Friday, US Immigration Judge Samuel B. Cole granted asylum to Mr. Yee, now 18, who flew to Chicago in December. “His prosecution, detention, and general maltreatment at the hands of the Singapore authorities constitute persecution,” Judge Cole ruled.

5 Easy Ways to Make Fast Cash

5 Easy Ways to Make Fast Cash

For aluminum cans, you'll generally get 40 cents per pound, and maybe 50 cents a pound if you bring in 100 pounds or more. If you have old computer equipment, you could also recycle that for money -- not much, though.

US leads boycott of nuclear weapons ban talks

US leads boycott of nuclear weapons ban talks

More than 100 countries on Monday launched the first UN talks aimed at achieving a legally binding ban on nuclear weapons, as Washington led an international boycott of a process it deems unrealistic. Before the conference had even begun, the US ambassador to the UN, Nikki Haley, spoke out to reject the proposal in the light of current global security threats. "As a mom and a daughter there is nothing I want more for my family than a world with no nuclear weapons," Haley, who represents the world's largest nuclear power, said on the sidelines of the meeting.

The 8 best new features Apple added to your iPhone in iOS 10.3

The 8 best new features Apple added to your iPhone in iOS 10.3

After releasing roughly 437 different iOS 10.3 betas to developers over the past few weeks alone, Apple has finally released iOS 10.3 to the public. The new mobile software is available as an over the air (OTA) download or as a download through iTunes on a Mac or Windows PC, and it's compatible with 19 different Apple devices dating as far back as the iPhone 5, 4th-generation iPad, iPad mini 2, and the 6th-generation iPod touch. Should you be excited? Should you rush to download and install iOS 10.3 on your iPhone or iPad as soon as possible? In this post, we'll run through all of the top new features Apple introduced in iOS 10.3. Find My AirPods: The most talked-about new feature in iOS 10.3 is Find My AirPods, which obviously only matters if you own a pair of Apple's hot new AirPods. They're still next to impossible to find in Apple stores, so Amazon is really your only hope if you want AirPods anytime soon. There's now a new option in the Find My iPhone app that can track down your AirPods, but it's nowhere near as accurate or as useful as it is for iPhones and iPads since AirPods don't have a GPS radio or the ability to connect to any networks. Instead, this is basically a log that will show you the last location where your iPhone was connected to your AirPods. If you forget your AirPods somewhere, this nifty new feature could definitely help you find them. If you haven't connected to them in a while or if they're stolen, you're pretty much out of luck. App Transition Animations: You might not even notice this one, but Apple made a subtle change to the transition animations that are shown as apps open and close in iOS 10.3. They now have slightly more rounded edges, which is definitely not a big deal. But they also seem to move a bit faster, which is a big deal since it speeds up the interface a bit. Weather in Maps: In the Maps app, users can now 3D Touch the weather icon to see a local forecast for the area. Apple ID Profile: There is now a new Apple ID profile section in the Settings app that you'll see at the very top of the first screen. It gives you access to a single page where you'll find your full contact profile, security settings, payment information, iCloud account details, App Store settings, Family Sharing settings and a bit more. Also of note, this page displays every Apple device where you're currently signed in. iCloud Storage: You'll now find a new section at the top of your iCloud settings page with a breakdown of how your iCloud storage is being used. New File System: This is a big one, though it takes place completely behind the scenes so you won't even realize it's happening. Installing iOS 10.3 will automatically update your iPhone or iPad to use Apple File System (APFS) instead of HFS+. APFS is better optimized for NAND flash storage so files can be accessed more quickly, and it also supports stronger encryption. Voice Call Continuity for Verizon: This is obviously a new feature that will only be appreciated by Verizon Wireless subscribers, but iCloud calling features are now finally supported if you use Verizon. That means you can make or receive voice calls on your Mac, iPad, iPod touch, and Apple Watch. Podcasts Widget: You know that widgets panel you never use? There's a new Podcasts widget available now (it's actually a pretty cool addition for podcast fans).

Activist hedge funds press Tangoe to sell itself: sources

Activist hedge funds press Tangoe to sell itself: sources

Two activist hedge funds are pressing directors of Tangoe Inc. to sell the company, according to people familiar with the matter, citing a weakness in the IT company's business and falling stock price. Ancora Advisors and Engine Capital sent a letter to the company's board of directors last week urging the company to resist the temptation to remain independent, and to do everything possible to seek a buyer, sources said. Tangoe's stock is currently trading at $5.04 per share and its market value is around $200 million.

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

A 6,800-ton South Korean ferry was hoisted to the surface last week nearly three years after it capsized and sank in violent seas off the country's southwestern coast, an emotional moment for the nation as it searches for closure to one of its deadliest disasters. More than 300 people — most of whom were students on a high school trip — died when the Sewol sank on April 16, 2014, touching off an outpouring of national grief and soul searching about long-ignored public safety and regulatory failures.

Brazil tainted meat: Three key markets resume imports

Brazil tainted meat: Three key markets resume imports

Brasília (AFP) - Brazil won a major victory Saturday in the fight to restore credibility amid a tainted meat scandal, with key markets China, Egypt and Chile lifting their bans on its products. The three countries, which had totally closed their markets to Brazilian meat at the beginning of the week, said they would open them to all but imports from the 21 Brazilian processing plants under investigation. About 20 countries this week -- including the European Union, Japan and Mexico -- closed fully or partially their doors to Brazilian meat imports, whose sales brought in more than $13 billion to the Brazilian economy in 2016.

Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against Assad

Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against Assad

By Tom Miles GENEVA (Reuters) - The Syrian opposition rejects terrorism and is "fed up" with banned militants but they cannot be stopped if Syria continues evicting populations of besieged areas, opposition negotiator Basma Kodmani said on Sunday. Syria's government has always cited the fight against terrorism to justify its part in a six-year war that has killed hundreds of thousands, and brands all its opponents and their backers as terrorists and sponsors of terror. The opposition's chief negotiator Nasr al-Hariri, who is trying to negotiate an end the rule of President Bashar al-Assad, began this month by saying its stance against terrorism was proven on the battlefield and not mere words.

Washington's cherry blossoms bloom despite cold snap

Washington's cherry blossoms bloom despite cold snap

A mild winter followed by a spate of cold weather in Washington, made its mark on the city’s cherry blossoms, but the annual festival delighted first-time visitors on Sunday. The cherry blossom trees were a gift from Japan to the United States in 1912. The cherry blossom trees currently grow in three National Park Service locations, including the Tidal Basin, Hains Point and on the Washington Monument grounds.

Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

This past Friday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk dashed the hopes and dreams of prospective Model 3 owners with just a few simple tweets. Tempering expectations, Musk emphasized that Tesla's upcoming Model 3 will not be more advanced -- in any capacity -- than the company's flagship Model S. "Model 3 is just a smaller, more affordable version of Model S [with] less range & power & fewer features," Musk said. "Model S has more advanced technology." Musk later added that the Model 3 will not feature the elegant "auto extend handles" Tesla introduced on the Model S. While Muks's comments here might seem obvious, the reality is that some of the hype and speculation surrounding the Model 3 had reached bizarre levels in recent months. Case in point: because the Model 3 prototype Tesla unveiled last year lacked an instrument panel with traditional gauges for items like speed, range and other pertinent information, many Tesla enthusiasts began wondering if Tesla had some special plan for the dashboard, with many believing that a heads up display (HUD) on the windshield was an inevitability. As a quick reminder, here's a photo of the Model 3 interior taken from the company's special event last year. As is evident below, the only location a driver can access information is the 15-inch touchscreen in the center console. In another shot, we can see that Model 3 drivers will have to divert their eyes to the upper left hand corner of the display in order to ascertain their current speed. Alas, Tesla doesn't have any secret plans to implement some advanced HUD on the Model 3. In a tweet addressing the matter, Musk said that as cars become more autonomous, the need for a suite of information at the ready becomes less of an issue. https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/845285846936825856 Still, we're still a long ways off before fully self driving cars become commonplace. In turn, it remains to be seen if the Model 3 design in its current incarnation is perhaps too far ahead of its time. Besides, autonomous driving features for the Model 3 will cost extra, meaning that not every Model 3 on the road will be able to take advantage of the vehicle's self-driving capabilities. One question about the Model 3 that remains unanswered is whether or not can expect any changes to the car's steering wheel design. This past April, Musk boasted that the final design will be akin to a spaceship. https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/716729420078133248 To answer that, we'll probably have to wait until next July when Tesla is planning the next phase of its Model 3 reveal.

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People

The research used detailed brain scans to compare the brains of people who were blind to the brains of people who were not blind. Such brain changes arise because the brain has a "plastic" quality, meaning that it can make new connections among neurons, the study said. "Even in the case of being profoundly blind, the brain rewires itself in a manner to use the information at its disposal so that it can interact with the environment in a more effective manner," senior study author Dr. Lotfi Merabet, the director of the Laboratory for Visual Neuroplasticity at Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, said in a statement.

White House threatens to bypass hardline conservatives on tax reform

White House threatens to bypass hardline conservatives on tax reform

By Lindsay Dunsmuir and Doina Chiacu WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Fresh off a defeat on U.S. healthcare legislation, the White House warned rebellious conservative lawmakers that they should get behind President Donald Trump's agenda or he may bypass them on future legislative fights, including tax reform. The threat by White House chief of staff Reince Priebus to build a broad coalition on tax reform that could include moderate Democrats came as the Republican head of the tax-writing committee in the House of Representatives said he hoped to move a tax bill through his panel this spring. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady said his committee had been working on tax reform in parallel with the failed healthcare reform push.

Family of missing ex-FBI agent files lawsuit against Iran

Family of missing ex-FBI agent files lawsuit against Iran

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The family of a former FBI agent who went missing in Iran a decade ago on an unauthorized CIA assignment has filed a lawsuit against the Islamic Republic, accusing it of using "cold, cynical and false denials" to torture his loved ones.

Cities and monuments switch off for Earth Hour

Cities and monuments switch off for Earth Hour

The Empire State Building and United Nations headquarters in New York joined other iconic buildings and monuments around the world plunging into darkness for sixty minutes on Saturday to mark Earth Hour and draw attention to climate change. The Eiffel Tower, the Kremlin, the Acropolis in Athens and Sydney's Opera House also dimmed their lights as millions of people from some 170 countries and territories were expected to take part in Earth Hour, the annual bid to highlight global warming caused by the burning of coal, oil and gas to drive cars and power plants.

Violence erupts at pro-Trump rally on California beach

Violence erupts at pro-Trump rally on California beach

Supporters of President Trump holding a rally on a popular Southern California beach clashed with counter-protesters on Saturday and four people were arrested, law enforcement said. Multiple fights broke out and at least one Trump supporter was doused with pepper spray when pro-Trump demonstrators marching along Bolsa Chica State Beach encountered a small group opposed to the Republican president who had gathered to denounce the rally. Four counter-protesters were arrested, three for illegal use of pepper spray and one for assault and battery, Kevin Pearsall, a spokesman for the California State Parks Police said on Saturday evening.

'Now or never' for Europe, French think tank warns

'Now or never' for Europe, French think tank warns

By Noah Barkin BERLIN (Reuters) - The leaders of France and Germany must use the window of opportunity that opens up after elections in both countries to inject new momentum into their single currency project or risk its failure, a leading French think tank warned on Monday. In a 77-page report entitled "The Europe We Need", the Institut Montaigne, an independent institute with links to French presidential candidates Emmanuel Macron and Francois Fillon, called for a "multi-speed" Europe in which the euro zone presses ahead with its own budget and even a prime minister. The report, the product of months of consultation between leading figures from European business, politics and banking, could serve as a blueprint for use by a new French president.

The buck stops with Trump

The buck stops with Trump

Donald Trump sat in the Oval Office on Friday evening in an unfamiliar position -- having to own failure. Fittingly perhaps, Trump addressed his failure from behind a desk in the Oval Office. Trump was not ready to take quite that much ownership, although he did profess to be "a little surprised" by the plan's failure.

Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

Anyone who's played a futuristic shooter since the dawn of video games knows that when you see something called a "railgun" you're in for a real treat. Well, the US Navy built a railgun of its very own, and it just showed off its remarkably powerful creation in a new video of its test firing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=106&v=Pi-BDIu_umo Railguns like the one the Navy has built trade chemical propellants like gunpowder for the sheer power of electricity, generating extremely strong magnetic fields to push a projectile down a set of rails and out the end of the barrel. It might not sound particularly efficient, but the speeds that railgun projectiles can achieve put traditional cannons to shame. The Navy's massive weapon, for example, launches its rounds at a whopping 4,500 mph. Additionally, the projectiles launched by the railgun do their damage not by exploding, but simply by striking their target while moving at such a high speed, quite literally tearing apart anything they come into contact with. For most of their history, railguns have been more fiction than science, and their practicality and reliability has repeatedly been questioned over time. The size of the device itself is typically massive, owing to the large and complex electronic components required to supply the necessary power. However, there are also some pretty fantastic benefits of the non-explosive rounds, such as much less chance of unexploded ordnance causing problems either on the ship or vehicle firing the weapon, or on the battlefield after a skirmish has ended.

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago

The medieval man was buried along with hundreds of others in a graveyard underneath what is now the Old Divinity School building of St. John's College at the University of Cambridge, in the United Kingdom. By studying his remains and piecing together his facial features and biological history, archeologists said they hope to understand the lives of anonymous poor people in the 13th century. "Most historical records are about well-off people and especially their financial and legal transactions," study lead researcher John Robb, a professor of archaeology at the University of Cambridge, said in a statement.

Florida man kills one, wounds five in 'horrific' shooting: police

Florida man kills one, wounds five in 'horrific' shooting: police

A man killed his girlfriend and wounded five other people, including two children and a high school student at a bus stop, during a shooting spree in central Florida on Monday, police said. Police say Allen D. Cashe opened fire a few hours after officers had been called to break up a dispute over a vehicle between him and his girlfriend, who was not identified. Cashe, 31, killed the girlfriend and critically wounded her two sons, ages 7 and 8, and her father, Sanford Police spokeswoman Bianca Gillett said.

wireless

Trump decides yes, he can stay mad at Freedom Caucus for health care defeat

Trump decides yes, he can stay mad at Freedom Caucus for health care defeat

President Trump did not blame House Republicans for failing to pass the bill to repeal and replace Obamacare after it was abruptly pulled. “Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!” Trump tweeted early Sunday. Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!

Gold coin worth $4 million stolen from Berlin museum

Gold coin worth $4 million stolen from Berlin museum

A Canadian gold coin named "Big Maple Leaf" which bears the image of Queen Elizabeth II was stolen in the early hours of Monday morning from Berlin's Bode Museum. Given the high purity of the gold used in the coin, its material value is estimated to be $4 million. The museum said on its website that the coin was issued by the Royal Canadian Mint in 2007 and that it was featured in the Guinness Book of Records for its "unmatched" degree of purity.

Washington's cherry blossoms bloom despite cold snap

Washington's cherry blossoms bloom despite cold snap

A mild winter followed by a spate of cold weather in Washington, made its mark on the city’s cherry blossoms, but the annual festival delighted first-time visitors on Sunday. The cherry blossom trees were a gift from Japan to the United States in 1912. The cherry blossom trees currently grow in three National Park Service locations, including the Tidal Basin, Hains Point and on the Washington Monument grounds.

Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrike

Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrike

WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. counterterrorism airstrike earlier this month in Afghanistan killed an al-Qaida leader responsible for a deadly hotel attack in Islamabad in 2008 and the 2009 attack on a bus carrying the Sri Lankan cricket team, the Pentagon said Saturday.

United Airlines bars girls with leggings, ignites Twitter storm

United Airlines bars girls with leggings, ignites Twitter storm

United Airlines has run into a social media storm after it barred two teenage girls from boarding a flight in Denver because they were wearing leggings. Another girl who was also wearing leggings was allowed to board the flight from Denver International Airport to Minneapolis after she changed, a witness said. A United spokesman Jonathan Guerin told the New York Times that the two girls barred from flying "made an adjustment" to their clothing and were waiting for the next flight to Minneapolis.

Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains

Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Golf ball-sized hail and powerful winds are expected to roll through parts of the Southern Plains late Sunday, marking the latest round of turbulent weather across the Midwest and South, forecasters said.

Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?

Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?

Infowars owner and long-time conspiracy theorist Alex Jones admitted that his site falsely reported and commented on the debunked “Pizzagate” controversy, a theory that alleged that Comet Ping Pong, a Washington, D.C., pizza restaurant, had played a role in a child-sex-trafficking ring that also involved Hillary Clinton. Apologizing to the restaurant’s owner, James Alefantis, Mr. Jones issued a statement Friday. “I want our viewers and listeners to know that we regret any negative impact our commentaries may have had on Mr. Alefantis, Comet Ping Pong, or its employees,” he said.

Florida man kills one, wounds five in 'horrific' shooting: police

Florida man kills one, wounds five in 'horrific' shooting: police

A man killed his girlfriend and wounded five other people, including two children and a high school student at a bus stop, during a shooting spree in central Florida on Monday, police said. Police say Allen D. Cashe opened fire a few hours after officers had been called to break up a dispute over a vehicle between him and his girlfriend, who was not identified. Cashe, 31, killed the girlfriend and critically wounded her two sons, ages 7 and 8, and her father, Sanford Police spokeswoman Bianca Gillett said.

Iran strikes back at US with 'reciprocal' sanctions

Iran strikes back at US with 'reciprocal' sanctions

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran on Sunday sanctioned what it described as 15 American companies, alleging they support terrorism, repression and Israel's occupation of land Palestinians want for a future state, likely in retaliation for sanctions earlier announced by the U.S.

Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

This past Friday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk dashed the hopes and dreams of prospective Model 3 owners with just a few simple tweets. Tempering expectations, Musk emphasized that Tesla's upcoming Model 3 will not be more advanced -- in any capacity -- than the company's flagship Model S. "Model 3 is just a smaller, more affordable version of Model S [with] less range & power & fewer features," Musk said. "Model S has more advanced technology." Musk later added that the Model 3 will not feature the elegant "auto extend handles" Tesla introduced on the Model S. While Muks's comments here might seem obvious, the reality is that some of the hype and speculation surrounding the Model 3 had reached bizarre levels in recent months. Case in point: because the Model 3 prototype Tesla unveiled last year lacked an instrument panel with traditional gauges for items like speed, range and other pertinent information, many Tesla enthusiasts began wondering if Tesla had some special plan for the dashboard, with many believing that a heads up display (HUD) on the windshield was an inevitability. As a quick reminder, here's a photo of the Model 3 interior taken from the company's special event last year. As is evident below, the only location a driver can access information is the 15-inch touchscreen in the center console. In another shot, we can see that Model 3 drivers will have to divert their eyes to the upper left hand corner of the display in order to ascertain their current speed. Alas, Tesla doesn't have any secret plans to implement some advanced HUD on the Model 3. In a tweet addressing the matter, Musk said that as cars become more autonomous, the need for a suite of information at the ready becomes less of an issue. https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/845285846936825856 Still, we're still a long ways off before fully self driving cars become commonplace. In turn, it remains to be seen if the Model 3 design in its current incarnation is perhaps too far ahead of its time. Besides, autonomous driving features for the Model 3 will cost extra, meaning that not every Model 3 on the road will be able to take advantage of the vehicle's self-driving capabilities. One question about the Model 3 that remains unanswered is whether or not can expect any changes to the car's steering wheel design. This past April, Musk boasted that the final design will be akin to a spaceship. https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/716729420078133248 To answer that, we'll probably have to wait until next July when Tesla is planning the next phase of its Model 3 reveal.

EU clears merger of US chemicals giants Dow and DuPont

EU clears merger of US chemicals giants Dow and DuPont

The EU on Monday approved a $130 billion mega-merger of US agro-chemicals giants Dow Chemical and DuPont, paving the way for major consolidation in a sensitive sector for farmers and the environment. The decision by antitrust regulators was subject to Dupont selling "major parts" of its global pesticides business, said the European Commission, the EU's executive arm. "Due to significant commitments on products and the worldwide research and development organisation, the merger of Dow and Dupont can be approved," EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said.

Northeast Australia braces for cyclone, thousands flee to higher ground

Northeast Australia braces for cyclone, thousands flee to higher ground

By Tom Westbrook SYDNEY (Reuters) - Thousands of Australians fled their homes on Monday as a powerful cyclone bore down on coastal towns in Queensland, where authorities urged 30,000 people to evacuate low lying areas most at risk from tidal surges and winds of up to 300 km per hour (185 mph). Cyclone Debbie is expected to gather strength before making landfall in the northeast state early on Tuesday, with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology forecasting a category four storm, just one rung below the most dangerous wind speed level. The growing alarm persuaded the state government on Monday to warn some 25,000 people living in parts of Mackay, a city 950 kilometers (590 miles) north of the state capital Brisbane, to head south to higher ground.

Ted Koppel to Sean Hannity: You’re bad for America

Ted Koppel to Sean Hannity: You’re bad for America

Ted Koppel says Fox News host Sean Hannity is bad for America. On “CBS Sunday Morning,” the veteran newsman told Hannity that the audience he attracts is unable to distinguish between the divisive political rhetoric that marked the 2016 presidential campaign and the truth. “You have attracted people who are determined that ideology is more important than facts,” Koppel told Hannity.

Photos of the day - March 26, 2017

Photos of the day - March 26, 2017

A man waves traditional daggers, or jambiyas, as he attends with supporters of the Houthi movement and Yemen’s former president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, a rally to mark the two-year anniversary since the military intervention by a Saudi-led coalition, in Sanaa, Yemen; police officers detain an opposition supporter during a rally in Vladivostok, Russia; Balinese people carry giant effigies in the form of the devil, whose local name is “Ogoh-ogoh,” during a parade before Nyepi Day, the Balinese Day of Silence, marking the Balinese Hindu New Year in Gianyar, a regency in Bali, Indonesia. ...

With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

When Singapore’s first prime minister, Lee Kuan Yew, passed away in 2015, 16-year-old Amos Yee made an obscenity-filled YouTube video denouncing the late leader as a “tyrant.” That and other postings earned him a four-week jail sentence for “wounding religious feelings and obscenity.” Not long after, he earned another six-week sentence for derogatory comments on Islam and Christianity. On Friday, US Immigration Judge Samuel B. Cole granted asylum to Mr. Yee, now 18, who flew to Chicago in December. “His prosecution, detention, and general maltreatment at the hands of the Singapore authorities constitute persecution,” Judge Cole ruled.

Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

When it was released last fall, Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 was the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. Unfortunately though, the Galaxy Note 7 was literally the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. A poor battery design caused dozens of phones to explode while being charged — and in some cases, while unplugged and in use — causing property damage and even injuring some users in the process. As a result, Samsung was forced to issue an unprecedented global recall, asking everyone around the world who purchased the phone to return or exchange it as soon as possible. Most of the potentially destructive smartphones have been collected by now. Since the phone was so impressive, however, a small percentage of holdouts have refused to give up their precious Note 7 handsets. We're not sure why Samsung waited as long as it did, but the company is finally taking its final step in ensuring that the Note 7 cannot do anymore damage. According to South Korean news site Yonhap News, Samsung will take steps next week to completely disable any remaining Galaxy Note 7 smartphones that may still be in use. The company said some time ago that 97% of all Note 7 phones have been reclaimed by the company. With more than 1 million handsets sold before Samsung discontinued the phone, however, that leaves tens of thousands of Note 7 handsets still in users' hands. According to the report, Samsung plans to issue a mandatory software update that will completely prevent any remaining Galaxy Note 7 devices from holding a charge. As a result, the phones will no longer be able to power on unless they are plugged in. Samsung and its carrier partners issued a similar software update in the US late last year and in early 2017, and now any remaining markets where the Note 7 might still be in use will get the update. Diehard Samsung fans who were holding onto their Note 7 phones won't have to wait very long before their soon-to-be crippled Note 7 phones are replaced. Samsung will unveil its new Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ flagship phones on Wednesday, and they'll be released about a month later.

Brazil tainted meat: Three key markets resume imports

Brazil tainted meat: Three key markets resume imports

Brasília (AFP) - Brazil won a major victory Saturday in the fight to restore credibility amid a tainted meat scandal, with key markets China, Egypt and Chile lifting their bans on its products. The three countries, which had totally closed their markets to Brazilian meat at the beginning of the week, said they would open them to all but imports from the 21 Brazilian processing plants under investigation. About 20 countries this week -- including the European Union, Japan and Mexico -- closed fully or partially their doors to Brazilian meat imports, whose sales brought in more than $13 billion to the Brazilian economy in 2016.

Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against Assad

Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against Assad

By Tom Miles GENEVA (Reuters) - The Syrian opposition rejects terrorism and is "fed up" with banned militants but they cannot be stopped if Syria continues evicting populations of besieged areas, opposition negotiator Basma Kodmani said on Sunday. Syria's government has always cited the fight against terrorism to justify its part in a six-year war that has killed hundreds of thousands, and brands all its opponents and their backers as terrorists and sponsors of terror. The opposition's chief negotiator Nasr al-Hariri, who is trying to negotiate an end the rule of President Bashar al-Assad, began this month by saying its stance against terrorism was proven on the battlefield and not mere words.

The buck stops with Trump

The buck stops with Trump

Donald Trump sat in the Oval Office on Friday evening in an unfamiliar position -- having to own failure. Fittingly perhaps, Trump addressed his failure from behind a desk in the Oval Office. Trump was not ready to take quite that much ownership, although he did profess to be "a little surprised" by the plan's failure.

Activist hedge funds press Tangoe to sell itself: sources

Activist hedge funds press Tangoe to sell itself: sources

Two activist hedge funds are pressing directors of Tangoe Inc. to sell the company, according to people familiar with the matter, citing a weakness in the IT company's business and falling stock price. Ancora Advisors and Engine Capital sent a letter to the company's board of directors last week urging the company to resist the temptation to remain independent, and to do everything possible to seek a buyer, sources said. Tangoe's stock is currently trading at $5.04 per share and its market value is around $200 million.

5 Easy Ways to Make Fast Cash

5 Easy Ways to Make Fast Cash

For aluminum cans, you'll generally get 40 cents per pound, and maybe 50 cents a pound if you bring in 100 pounds or more. If you have old computer equipment, you could also recycle that for money -- not much, though.

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

A 6,800-ton South Korean ferry was hoisted to the surface last week nearly three years after it capsized and sank in violent seas off the country's southwestern coast, an emotional moment for the nation as it searches for closure to one of its deadliest disasters. More than 300 people — most of whom were students on a high school trip — died when the Sewol sank on April 16, 2014, touching off an outpouring of national grief and soul searching about long-ignored public safety and regulatory failures.

Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

Anyone who's played a futuristic shooter since the dawn of video games knows that when you see something called a "railgun" you're in for a real treat. Well, the US Navy built a railgun of its very own, and it just showed off its remarkably powerful creation in a new video of its test firing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=106&v=Pi-BDIu_umo Railguns like the one the Navy has built trade chemical propellants like gunpowder for the sheer power of electricity, generating extremely strong magnetic fields to push a projectile down a set of rails and out the end of the barrel. It might not sound particularly efficient, but the speeds that railgun projectiles can achieve put traditional cannons to shame. The Navy's massive weapon, for example, launches its rounds at a whopping 4,500 mph. Additionally, the projectiles launched by the railgun do their damage not by exploding, but simply by striking their target while moving at such a high speed, quite literally tearing apart anything they come into contact with. For most of their history, railguns have been more fiction than science, and their practicality and reliability has repeatedly been questioned over time. The size of the device itself is typically massive, owing to the large and complex electronic components required to supply the necessary power. However, there are also some pretty fantastic benefits of the non-explosive rounds, such as much less chance of unexploded ordnance causing problems either on the ship or vehicle firing the weapon, or on the battlefield after a skirmish has ended.

Syrian rebels resume withdrawal from last Homs bastion: monitor

Syrian rebels resume withdrawal from last Homs bastion: monitor

Hundreds of rebels left their last bastion in Syria's Homs city on Monday, resuming an evacuation expected to be among the largest of its kind under a Russian-backed deal with the government, state media and a monitor said. Heavy fighting between rebel groups and the army further north in Hama province over the weekend had delayed their departure from the city's al-Waer district, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. The evacuation began last week with the Syrian government shuttling hundreds of people from the district in Homs, which was an early center of the 2011 uprising that spiraled into war.

Trump to roll back Obama clean power plan

Trump to roll back Obama clean power plan

President Donald Trump will sign an executive order Tuesday to undo his predecessor Barack Obama's plan to limit greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fueled power plants, according to the new environmental chief. Speaking on ABC's Sunday talk show "This Week," Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt said rolling back Obama's 2015 Clean Power Plan would bring back coal jobs.

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People

The research used detailed brain scans to compare the brains of people who were blind to the brains of people who were not blind. Such brain changes arise because the brain has a "plastic" quality, meaning that it can make new connections among neurons, the study said. "Even in the case of being profoundly blind, the brain rewires itself in a manner to use the information at its disposal so that it can interact with the environment in a more effective manner," senior study author Dr. Lotfi Merabet, the director of the Laboratory for Visual Neuroplasticity at Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, said in a statement.

One killed in shooting on Las Vegas Strip, suspect surrenders

One killed in shooting on Las Vegas Strip, suspect surrenders

One person was killed Saturday and another wounded in a shooting on a bus on the busy Las Vegas strip, police said, with a suspect later surrendering himself to authorities. Police closed a section of South Las Vegas Boulevard for hours after the shooting as a standoff unfolded with the suspect, who had barricaded himself on the bus. "The suspect in the bus has surrendered to officers, and is in custody," the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department said on its Twitter account.

Family of missing ex-FBI agent files lawsuit against Iran

Family of missing ex-FBI agent files lawsuit against Iran

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The family of a former FBI agent who went missing in Iran a decade ago on an unauthorized CIA assignment has filed a lawsuit against the Islamic Republic, accusing it of using "cold, cynical and false denials" to torture his loved ones.

What Is Melania Trump Doing?

What Is Melania Trump Doing?

The first lady was reportedly set to appear at Wednesday's International Women of Courage Award ceremony as a special guest.

Bulgarian center-right GERB wins most votes in election

Bulgarian center-right GERB wins most votes in election

By Tsvetelia Tsolova and Angel Krasimirov SOFIA (Reuters) - Bulgaria's center-right GERB party narrowly won a parliamentary election on Sunday, giving it a chance to form another government after leader Boiko Borisov resigned as prime minister in November, triggering the snap poll. The GERB party won 33 percent of the vote, the Balkan country's third in just 4 years, with the leftist Socialists trailing on 27.2 percent, partial official results with 26 percent of the ballots counted showed. "The result of the vote shows that GERB is obliged to form a government," said Borisov.

White House threatens to bypass hardline conservatives on tax reform

White House threatens to bypass hardline conservatives on tax reform

By Lindsay Dunsmuir and Doina Chiacu WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Fresh off a defeat on U.S. healthcare legislation, the White House warned rebellious conservative lawmakers that they should get behind President Donald Trump's agenda or he may bypass them on future legislative fights, including tax reform. The threat by White House chief of staff Reince Priebus to build a broad coalition on tax reform that could include moderate Democrats came as the Republican head of the tax-writing committee in the House of Representatives said he hoped to move a tax bill through his panel this spring. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady said his committee had been working on tax reform in parallel with the failed healthcare reform push.

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago

The medieval man was buried along with hundreds of others in a graveyard underneath what is now the Old Divinity School building of St. John's College at the University of Cambridge, in the United Kingdom. By studying his remains and piecing together his facial features and biological history, archeologists said they hope to understand the lives of anonymous poor people in the 13th century. "Most historical records are about well-off people and especially their financial and legal transactions," study lead researcher John Robb, a professor of archaeology at the University of Cambridge, said in a statement.

Cities and monuments switch off for Earth Hour

Cities and monuments switch off for Earth Hour

The Empire State Building and United Nations headquarters in New York joined other iconic buildings and monuments around the world plunging into darkness for sixty minutes on Saturday to mark Earth Hour and draw attention to climate change. The Eiffel Tower, the Kremlin, the Acropolis in Athens and Sydney's Opera House also dimmed their lights as millions of people from some 170 countries and territories were expected to take part in Earth Hour, the annual bid to highlight global warming caused by the burning of coal, oil and gas to drive cars and power plants.

Cincinnati nightclub shooting

Cincinnati nightclub shooting

Gunfire erupted early Sunday inside a crowded Cincinnati nightclub after a dispute broke out among several men, killing one man and injuring 15 other people, authorities said. Cincinnati Police Chief Eliot Isaac said one of the wounded was in “extremely critical condition.” A hospital spokeswoman said two victims were listed in critical condition, but she had no other details. Police began receiving calls at 1:30 a.m. about gunshots at the club near the Ohio River east of downtown Cincinnati.

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Trump decides yes, he can stay mad at Freedom Caucus for health care defeat

Trump decides yes, he can stay mad at Freedom Caucus for health care defeat

President Trump did not blame House Republicans for failing to pass the bill to repeal and replace Obamacare after it was abruptly pulled. “Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!” Trump tweeted early Sunday. Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!

Gold coin worth $4 million stolen from Berlin museum

Gold coin worth $4 million stolen from Berlin museum

A Canadian gold coin named "Big Maple Leaf" which bears the image of Queen Elizabeth II was stolen in the early hours of Monday morning from Berlin's Bode Museum. Given the high purity of the gold used in the coin, its material value is estimated to be $4 million. The museum said on its website that the coin was issued by the Royal Canadian Mint in 2007 and that it was featured in the Guinness Book of Records for its "unmatched" degree of purity.

Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrike

Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrike

WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. counterterrorism airstrike earlier this month in Afghanistan killed an al-Qaida leader responsible for a deadly hotel attack in Islamabad in 2008 and the 2009 attack on a bus carrying the Sri Lankan cricket team, the Pentagon said Saturday.

New York skyscrapers adapt to climate change

New York skyscrapers adapt to climate change

With a skyline crowded with ever-more luxury towers, the construction of another Manhattan skyscraper wouldn't normally be remarkable. Planned just after deadly Hurricane Sandy ravaged New York in October 2012 -- sounding another alarm about the mounting effects of climate change -- it was designed with new threats in mind, reflecting how the real estate world is evolving to account for global warming, in contrast to President Donald Trump's moves to roll back environmental protection. The huge storm killed more than 40 people in New York, paralyzing the US financial capital for days.

Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?

Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?

Infowars owner and long-time conspiracy theorist Alex Jones admitted that his site falsely reported and commented on the debunked “Pizzagate” controversy, a theory that alleged that Comet Ping Pong, a Washington, D.C., pizza restaurant, had played a role in a child-sex-trafficking ring that also involved Hillary Clinton. Apologizing to the restaurant’s owner, James Alefantis, Mr. Jones issued a statement Friday. “I want our viewers and listeners to know that we regret any negative impact our commentaries may have had on Mr. Alefantis, Comet Ping Pong, or its employees,” he said.

Florida man kills one, wounds five in 'horrific' shooting: police

Florida man kills one, wounds five in 'horrific' shooting: police

A man killed his girlfriend and wounded five other people, including two children and a high school student at a bus stop, during a shooting spree in central Florida on Monday, police said. Police say Allen D. Cashe opened fire a few hours after officers had been called to break up a dispute over a vehicle between him and his girlfriend, who was not identified. Cashe, 31, killed the girlfriend and critically wounded her two sons, ages 7 and 8, and her father, Sanford Police spokeswoman Bianca Gillett said.

The 8 best new features Apple added to your iPhone in iOS 10.3

The 8 best new features Apple added to your iPhone in iOS 10.3

After releasing roughly 437 different iOS 10.3 betas to developers over the past few weeks alone, Apple has finally released iOS 10.3 to the public. The new mobile software is available as an over the air (OTA) download or as a download through iTunes on a Mac or Windows PC, and it's compatible with 19 different Apple devices dating as far back as the iPhone 5, 4th-generation iPad, iPad mini 2, and the 6th-generation iPod touch. Should you be excited? Should you rush to download and install iOS 10.3 on your iPhone or iPad as soon as possible? In this post, we'll run through all of the top new features Apple introduced in iOS 10.3. Find My AirPods: The most talked-about new feature in iOS 10.3 is Find My AirPods, which obviously only matters if you own a pair of Apple's hot new AirPods. They're still next to impossible to find in Apple stores, so Amazon is really your only hope if you want AirPods anytime soon. There's now a new option in the Find My iPhone app that can track down your AirPods, but it's nowhere near as accurate or as useful as it is for iPhones and iPads since AirPods don't have a GPS radio or the ability to connect to any networks. Instead, this is basically a log that will show you the last location where your iPhone was connected to your AirPods. If you forget your AirPods somewhere, this nifty new feature could definitely help you find them. If you haven't connected to them in a while or if they're stolen, you're pretty much out of luck. App Transition Animations: You might not even notice this one, but Apple made a subtle change to the transition animations that are shown as apps open and close in iOS 10.3. They now have slightly more rounded edges, which is definitely not a big deal. But they also seem to move a bit faster, which is a big deal since it speeds up the interface a bit. Weather in Maps: In the Maps app, users can now 3D Touch the weather icon to see a local forecast for the area. Apple ID Profile: There is now a new Apple ID profile section in the Settings app that you'll see at the very top of the first screen. It gives you access to a single page where you'll find your full contact profile, security settings, payment information, iCloud account details, App Store settings, Family Sharing settings and a bit more. Also of note, this page displays every Apple device where you're currently signed in. iCloud Storage: You'll now find a new section at the top of your iCloud settings page with a breakdown of how your iCloud storage is being used. New File System: This is a big one, though it takes place completely behind the scenes so you won't even realize it's happening. Installing iOS 10.3 will automatically update your iPhone or iPad to use Apple File System (APFS) instead of HFS+. APFS is better optimized for NAND flash storage so files can be accessed more quickly, and it also supports stronger encryption. Voice Call Continuity for Verizon: This is obviously a new feature that will only be appreciated by Verizon Wireless subscribers, but iCloud calling features are now finally supported if you use Verizon. That means you can make or receive voice calls on your Mac, iPad, iPod touch, and Apple Watch. Podcasts Widget: You know that widgets panel you never use? There's a new Podcasts widget available now (it's actually a pretty cool addition for podcast fans).

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

A 6,800-ton South Korean ferry was hoisted to the surface last week nearly three years after it capsized and sank in violent seas off the country's southwestern coast, an emotional moment for the nation as it searches for closure to one of its deadliest disasters. More than 300 people — most of whom were students on a high school trip — died when the Sewol sank on April 16, 2014, touching off an outpouring of national grief and soul searching about long-ignored public safety and regulatory failures.

Northeast Australia braces for cyclone, thousands flee to higher ground

Northeast Australia braces for cyclone, thousands flee to higher ground

By Tom Westbrook SYDNEY (Reuters) - Thousands of Australians fled their homes on Monday as a powerful cyclone bore down on coastal towns in Queensland, where authorities urged 30,000 people to evacuate low lying areas most at risk from tidal surges and winds of up to 300 km per hour (185 mph). Cyclone Debbie is expected to gather strength before making landfall in the northeast state early on Tuesday, with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology forecasting a category four storm, just one rung below the most dangerous wind speed level. The growing alarm persuaded the state government on Monday to warn some 25,000 people living in parts of Mackay, a city 950 kilometers (590 miles) north of the state capital Brisbane, to head south to higher ground.

Photos of the day - March 26, 2017

Photos of the day - March 26, 2017

A man waves traditional daggers, or jambiyas, as he attends with supporters of the Houthi movement and Yemen’s former president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, a rally to mark the two-year anniversary since the military intervention by a Saudi-led coalition, in Sanaa, Yemen; police officers detain an opposition supporter during a rally in Vladivostok, Russia; Balinese people carry giant effigies in the form of the devil, whose local name is “Ogoh-ogoh,” during a parade before Nyepi Day, the Balinese Day of Silence, marking the Balinese Hindu New Year in Gianyar, a regency in Bali, Indonesia. ...

Ted Koppel to Sean Hannity: You’re bad for America

Ted Koppel to Sean Hannity: You’re bad for America

Ted Koppel says Fox News host Sean Hannity is bad for America. On “CBS Sunday Morning,” the veteran newsman told Hannity that the audience he attracts is unable to distinguish between the divisive political rhetoric that marked the 2016 presidential campaign and the truth. “You have attracted people who are determined that ideology is more important than facts,” Koppel told Hannity.

Brazil tainted meat: Three key markets resume imports

Brazil tainted meat: Three key markets resume imports

Brasília (AFP) - Brazil won a major victory Saturday in the fight to restore credibility amid a tainted meat scandal, with key markets China, Egypt and Chile lifting their bans on its products. The three countries, which had totally closed their markets to Brazilian meat at the beginning of the week, said they would open them to all but imports from the 21 Brazilian processing plants under investigation. About 20 countries this week -- including the European Union, Japan and Mexico -- closed fully or partially their doors to Brazilian meat imports, whose sales brought in more than $13 billion to the Brazilian economy in 2016.

With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

When Singapore’s first prime minister, Lee Kuan Yew, passed away in 2015, 16-year-old Amos Yee made an obscenity-filled YouTube video denouncing the late leader as a “tyrant.” That and other postings earned him a four-week jail sentence for “wounding religious feelings and obscenity.” Not long after, he earned another six-week sentence for derogatory comments on Islam and Christianity. On Friday, US Immigration Judge Samuel B. Cole granted asylum to Mr. Yee, now 18, who flew to Chicago in December. “His prosecution, detention, and general maltreatment at the hands of the Singapore authorities constitute persecution,” Judge Cole ruled.

Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

When it was released last fall, Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 was the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. Unfortunately though, the Galaxy Note 7 was literally the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. A poor battery design caused dozens of phones to explode while being charged — and in some cases, while unplugged and in use — causing property damage and even injuring some users in the process. As a result, Samsung was forced to issue an unprecedented global recall, asking everyone around the world who purchased the phone to return or exchange it as soon as possible. Most of the potentially destructive smartphones have been collected by now. Since the phone was so impressive, however, a small percentage of holdouts have refused to give up their precious Note 7 handsets. We're not sure why Samsung waited as long as it did, but the company is finally taking its final step in ensuring that the Note 7 cannot do anymore damage. According to South Korean news site Yonhap News, Samsung will take steps next week to completely disable any remaining Galaxy Note 7 smartphones that may still be in use. The company said some time ago that 97% of all Note 7 phones have been reclaimed by the company. With more than 1 million handsets sold before Samsung discontinued the phone, however, that leaves tens of thousands of Note 7 handsets still in users' hands. According to the report, Samsung plans to issue a mandatory software update that will completely prevent any remaining Galaxy Note 7 devices from holding a charge. As a result, the phones will no longer be able to power on unless they are plugged in. Samsung and its carrier partners issued a similar software update in the US late last year and in early 2017, and now any remaining markets where the Note 7 might still be in use will get the update. Diehard Samsung fans who were holding onto their Note 7 phones won't have to wait very long before their soon-to-be crippled Note 7 phones are replaced. Samsung will unveil its new Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ flagship phones on Wednesday, and they'll be released about a month later.

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago

The medieval man was buried along with hundreds of others in a graveyard underneath what is now the Old Divinity School building of St. John's College at the University of Cambridge, in the United Kingdom. By studying his remains and piecing together his facial features and biological history, archeologists said they hope to understand the lives of anonymous poor people in the 13th century. "Most historical records are about well-off people and especially their financial and legal transactions," study lead researcher John Robb, a professor of archaeology at the University of Cambridge, said in a statement.

Iran strikes back at US with 'reciprocal' sanctions

Iran strikes back at US with 'reciprocal' sanctions

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran on Sunday sanctioned what it described as 15 American companies, alleging they support terrorism, repression and Israel's occupation of land Palestinians want for a future state, likely in retaliation for sanctions earlier announced by the U.S.

United Airlines bars teenage girls in leggings from flight

United Airlines bars teenage girls in leggings from flight

"The passengers this morning were United pass riders who were not in compliance with our dress code policy for company benefit travel," the airline said on Twitter as the incident Thanwent viral on social media. In another tweet made in response to a question from a social media user, the airline said: "Casual attire for ticketed passengers is fine. United pass travelers are company employees or family members of employees.

Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains

Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Golf ball-sized hail and powerful winds are expected to roll through parts of the Southern Plains late Sunday, marking the latest round of turbulent weather across the Midwest and South, forecasters said.

Seven students, one teacher killed in Japan avalanche

Seven students, one teacher killed in Japan avalanche

An avalanche Monday killed seven Japanese high school students and a teacher on a mountain-climbing outing, and injured 40 more. More than 100 troops were deployed in a major rescue mission after the avalanche hit ski slopes in Tochigi prefecture north of Tokyo. A total of 52 students and 11 teachers from seven high schools were on a three-day mountaineering expedition when disaster struck.

Syrian rebels resume withdrawal from last Homs bastion: monitor

Syrian rebels resume withdrawal from last Homs bastion: monitor

Hundreds of rebels left their last bastion in Syria's Homs city on Monday, resuming an evacuation expected to be among the largest of its kind under a Russian-backed deal with the government, state media and a monitor said. Heavy fighting between rebel groups and the army further north in Hama province over the weekend had delayed their departure from the city's al-Waer district, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. The evacuation began last week with the Syrian government shuttling hundreds of people from the district in Homs, which was an early center of the 2011 uprising that spiraled into war.

Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

This past Friday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk dashed the hopes and dreams of prospective Model 3 owners with just a few simple tweets. Tempering expectations, Musk emphasized that Tesla's upcoming Model 3 will not be more advanced -- in any capacity -- than the company's flagship Model S. "Model 3 is just a smaller, more affordable version of Model S [with] less range & power & fewer features," Musk said. "Model S has more advanced technology." Musk later added that the Model 3 will not feature the elegant "auto extend handles" Tesla introduced on the Model S. While Muks's comments here might seem obvious, the reality is that some of the hype and speculation surrounding the Model 3 had reached bizarre levels in recent months. Case in point: because the Model 3 prototype Tesla unveiled last year lacked an instrument panel with traditional gauges for items like speed, range and other pertinent information, many Tesla enthusiasts began wondering if Tesla had some special plan for the dashboard, with many believing that a heads up display (HUD) on the windshield was an inevitability. As a quick reminder, here's a photo of the Model 3 interior taken from the company's special event last year. As is evident below, the only location a driver can access information is the 15-inch touchscreen in the center console. In another shot, we can see that Model 3 drivers will have to divert their eyes to the upper left hand corner of the display in order to ascertain their current speed. Alas, Tesla doesn't have any secret plans to implement some advanced HUD on the Model 3. In a tweet addressing the matter, Musk said that as cars become more autonomous, the need for a suite of information at the ready becomes less of an issue. https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/845285846936825856 Still, we're still a long ways off before fully self driving cars become commonplace. In turn, it remains to be seen if the Model 3 design in its current incarnation is perhaps too far ahead of its time. Besides, autonomous driving features for the Model 3 will cost extra, meaning that not every Model 3 on the road will be able to take advantage of the vehicle's self-driving capabilities. One question about the Model 3 that remains unanswered is whether or not can expect any changes to the car's steering wheel design. This past April, Musk boasted that the final design will be akin to a spaceship. https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/716729420078133248 To answer that, we'll probably have to wait until next July when Tesla is planning the next phase of its Model 3 reveal.

Washington's cherry blossoms bloom despite cold snap

Washington's cherry blossoms bloom despite cold snap

A mild winter followed by a spate of cold weather in Washington, made its mark on the city’s cherry blossoms, but the annual festival delighted first-time visitors on Sunday. The cherry blossom trees were a gift from Japan to the United States in 1912. The cherry blossom trees currently grow in three National Park Service locations, including the Tidal Basin, Hains Point and on the Washington Monument grounds.

Bulgarian center-right GERB wins most votes in election

Bulgarian center-right GERB wins most votes in election

By Tsvetelia Tsolova and Angel Krasimirov SOFIA (Reuters) - Bulgaria's center-right GERB party narrowly won a parliamentary election on Sunday, giving it a chance to form another government after leader Boiko Borisov resigned as prime minister in November, triggering the snap poll. The GERB party won 33 percent of the vote, the Balkan country's third in just 4 years, with the leftist Socialists trailing on 27.2 percent, partial official results with 26 percent of the ballots counted showed. "The result of the vote shows that GERB is obliged to form a government," said Borisov.

Family of missing ex-FBI agent files lawsuit against Iran

Family of missing ex-FBI agent files lawsuit against Iran

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The family of a former FBI agent who went missing in Iran a decade ago on an unauthorized CIA assignment has filed a lawsuit against the Islamic Republic, accusing it of using "cold, cynical and false denials" to torture his loved ones.

Why is Colorado risking hundreds of millions to protect its marijuana industry?

Why is Colorado risking hundreds of millions to protect its marijuana industry?

Colorado's state legislature is considering an unusual plan to defend the state's marijuana industry from a federal crackdown under the Trump administration. The bill would allow growers and sellers to reclassify their recreational marijuana as medical “based on a business need due to a change in local, state, or federal law or enforcement policy.” The strategy is meant to keep marijuana businesses afloat if the federal government comes after them, even if it means the state losing hundreds of millions of dollars in taxes. The bill represents a shift in how states might respond to what marijuana advocates say are an over-simplification of cannabis policy by the Trump administration.

5 Easy Ways to Make Fast Cash

5 Easy Ways to Make Fast Cash

For aluminum cans, you'll generally get 40 cents per pound, and maybe 50 cents a pound if you bring in 100 pounds or more. If you have old computer equipment, you could also recycle that for money -- not much, though.

Cities and monuments switch off for Earth Hour

Cities and monuments switch off for Earth Hour

The Empire State Building and United Nations headquarters in New York joined other iconic buildings and monuments around the world plunging into darkness for sixty minutes on Saturday to mark Earth Hour and draw attention to climate change. The Eiffel Tower, the Kremlin, the Acropolis in Athens and Sydney's Opera House also dimmed their lights as millions of people from some 170 countries and territories were expected to take part in Earth Hour, the annual bid to highlight global warming caused by the burning of coal, oil and gas to drive cars and power plants.

White House threatens to bypass hardline conservatives on tax reform

White House threatens to bypass hardline conservatives on tax reform

By Lindsay Dunsmuir and Doina Chiacu WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Fresh off a defeat on U.S. healthcare legislation, the White House warned rebellious conservative lawmakers that they should get behind President Donald Trump's agenda or he may bypass them on future legislative fights, including tax reform. The threat by White House chief of staff Reince Priebus to build a broad coalition on tax reform that could include moderate Democrats came as the Republican head of the tax-writing committee in the House of Representatives said he hoped to move a tax bill through his panel this spring. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady said his committee had been working on tax reform in parallel with the failed healthcare reform push.

Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

Anyone who's played a futuristic shooter since the dawn of video games knows that when you see something called a "railgun" you're in for a real treat. Well, the US Navy built a railgun of its very own, and it just showed off its remarkably powerful creation in a new video of its test firing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=106&v=Pi-BDIu_umo Railguns like the one the Navy has built trade chemical propellants like gunpowder for the sheer power of electricity, generating extremely strong magnetic fields to push a projectile down a set of rails and out the end of the barrel. It might not sound particularly efficient, but the speeds that railgun projectiles can achieve put traditional cannons to shame. The Navy's massive weapon, for example, launches its rounds at a whopping 4,500 mph. Additionally, the projectiles launched by the railgun do their damage not by exploding, but simply by striking their target while moving at such a high speed, quite literally tearing apart anything they come into contact with. For most of their history, railguns have been more fiction than science, and their practicality and reliability has repeatedly been questioned over time. The size of the device itself is typically massive, owing to the large and complex electronic components required to supply the necessary power. However, there are also some pretty fantastic benefits of the non-explosive rounds, such as much less chance of unexploded ordnance causing problems either on the ship or vehicle firing the weapon, or on the battlefield after a skirmish has ended.

One killed in shooting on Las Vegas Strip, suspect surrenders

One killed in shooting on Las Vegas Strip, suspect surrenders

One person was killed Saturday and another wounded in a shooting on a bus on the busy Las Vegas strip, police said, with a suspect later surrendering himself to authorities. Police closed a section of South Las Vegas Boulevard for hours after the shooting as a standoff unfolded with the suspect, who had barricaded himself on the bus. "The suspect in the bus has surrendered to officers, and is in custody," the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department said on its Twitter account.

Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against Assad

Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against Assad

By Tom Miles GENEVA (Reuters) - The Syrian opposition rejects terrorism and is "fed up" with banned militants but they cannot be stopped if Syria continues evicting populations of besieged areas, opposition negotiator Basma Kodmani said on Sunday. Syria's government has always cited the fight against terrorism to justify its part in a six-year war that has killed hundreds of thousands, and brands all its opponents and their backers as terrorists and sponsors of terror. The opposition's chief negotiator Nasr al-Hariri, who is trying to negotiate an end the rule of President Bashar al-Assad, began this month by saying its stance against terrorism was proven on the battlefield and not mere words.

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People

The research used detailed brain scans to compare the brains of people who were blind to the brains of people who were not blind. Such brain changes arise because the brain has a "plastic" quality, meaning that it can make new connections among neurons, the study said. "Even in the case of being profoundly blind, the brain rewires itself in a manner to use the information at its disposal so that it can interact with the environment in a more effective manner," senior study author Dr. Lotfi Merabet, the director of the Laboratory for Visual Neuroplasticity at Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, said in a statement.

Photos of the day - March 25, 2017

Photos of the day - March 25, 2017

A woman dressed as “Europa" performs during a rally in Berlin marking the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome; a woman, pushed to the ground by police, tries to defends herself as the police detain an activist during an opposition rally in Minsk, Belarus; Pope Francis waves to the faithful from the Popemobile in Milan, Italy, as Cardinal Angelo Scola, the archbishop of Milan, looks on, after the Angelus in Duomo Square. These are some of the photos of the day. (AP/EPA/Getty/Reuters)

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Trump decides yes, he can stay mad at Freedom Caucus for health care defeat

Trump decides yes, he can stay mad at Freedom Caucus for health care defeat

President Trump did not blame House Republicans for failing to pass the bill to repeal and replace Obamacare after it was abruptly pulled. “Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!” Trump tweeted early Sunday. Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!

Gold coin worth $4 million stolen from Berlin museum

Gold coin worth $4 million stolen from Berlin museum

A Canadian gold coin named "Big Maple Leaf" which bears the image of Queen Elizabeth II was stolen in the early hours of Monday morning from Berlin's Bode Museum. Given the high purity of the gold used in the coin, its material value is estimated to be $4 million. The museum said on its website that the coin was issued by the Royal Canadian Mint in 2007 and that it was featured in the Guinness Book of Records for its "unmatched" degree of purity.

Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrike

Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrike

WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. counterterrorism airstrike earlier this month in Afghanistan killed an al-Qaida leader responsible for a deadly hotel attack in Islamabad in 2008 and the 2009 attack on a bus carrying the Sri Lankan cricket team, the Pentagon said Saturday.

New York skyscrapers adapt to climate change

New York skyscrapers adapt to climate change

With a skyline crowded with ever-more luxury towers, the construction of another Manhattan skyscraper wouldn't normally be remarkable. Planned just after deadly Hurricane Sandy ravaged New York in October 2012 -- sounding another alarm about the mounting effects of climate change -- it was designed with new threats in mind, reflecting how the real estate world is evolving to account for global warming, in contrast to President Donald Trump's moves to roll back environmental protection. The huge storm killed more than 40 people in New York, paralyzing the US financial capital for days.

Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?

Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?

Infowars owner and long-time conspiracy theorist Alex Jones admitted that his site falsely reported and commented on the debunked “Pizzagate” controversy, a theory that alleged that Comet Ping Pong, a Washington, D.C., pizza restaurant, had played a role in a child-sex-trafficking ring that also involved Hillary Clinton. Apologizing to the restaurant’s owner, James Alefantis, Mr. Jones issued a statement Friday. “I want our viewers and listeners to know that we regret any negative impact our commentaries may have had on Mr. Alefantis, Comet Ping Pong, or its employees,” he said.

Florida man kills one, wounds five in 'horrific' shooting: police

Florida man kills one, wounds five in 'horrific' shooting: police

A man killed his girlfriend and wounded five other people, including two children and a high school student at a bus stop, during a shooting spree in central Florida on Monday, police said. Police say Allen D. Cashe opened fire a few hours after officers had been called to break up a dispute over a vehicle between him and his girlfriend, who was not identified. Cashe, 31, killed the girlfriend and critically wounded her two sons, ages 7 and 8, and her father, Sanford Police spokeswoman Bianca Gillett said.

The 8 best new features Apple added to your iPhone in iOS 10.3

The 8 best new features Apple added to your iPhone in iOS 10.3

After releasing roughly 437 different iOS 10.3 betas to developers over the past few weeks alone, Apple has finally released iOS 10.3 to the public. The new mobile software is available as an over the air (OTA) download or as a download through iTunes on a Mac or Windows PC, and it's compatible with 19 different Apple devices dating as far back as the iPhone 5, 4th-generation iPad, iPad mini 2, and the 6th-generation iPod touch. Should you be excited? Should you rush to download and install iOS 10.3 on your iPhone or iPad as soon as possible? In this post, we'll run through all of the top new features Apple introduced in iOS 10.3. Find My AirPods: The most talked-about new feature in iOS 10.3 is Find My AirPods, which obviously only matters if you own a pair of Apple's hot new AirPods. They're still next to impossible to find in Apple stores, so Amazon is really your only hope if you want AirPods anytime soon. There's now a new option in the Find My iPhone app that can track down your AirPods, but it's nowhere near as accurate or as useful as it is for iPhones and iPads since AirPods don't have a GPS radio or the ability to connect to any networks. Instead, this is basically a log that will show you the last location where your iPhone was connected to your AirPods. If you forget your AirPods somewhere, this nifty new feature could definitely help you find them. If you haven't connected to them in a while or if they're stolen, you're pretty much out of luck. App Transition Animations: You might not even notice this one, but Apple made a subtle change to the transition animations that are shown as apps open and close in iOS 10.3. They now have slightly more rounded edges, which is definitely not a big deal. But they also seem to move a bit faster, which is a big deal since it speeds up the interface a bit. Weather in Maps: In the Maps app, users can now 3D Touch the weather icon to see a local forecast for the area. Apple ID Profile: There is now a new Apple ID profile section in the Settings app that you'll see at the very top of the first screen. It gives you access to a single page where you'll find your full contact profile, security settings, payment information, iCloud account details, App Store settings, Family Sharing settings and a bit more. Also of note, this page displays every Apple device where you're currently signed in. iCloud Storage: You'll now find a new section at the top of your iCloud settings page with a breakdown of how your iCloud storage is being used. New File System: This is a big one, though it takes place completely behind the scenes so you won't even realize it's happening. Installing iOS 10.3 will automatically update your iPhone or iPad to use Apple File System (APFS) instead of HFS+. APFS is better optimized for NAND flash storage so files can be accessed more quickly, and it also supports stronger encryption. Voice Call Continuity for Verizon: This is obviously a new feature that will only be appreciated by Verizon Wireless subscribers, but iCloud calling features are now finally supported if you use Verizon. That means you can make or receive voice calls on your Mac, iPad, iPod touch, and Apple Watch. Podcasts Widget: You know that widgets panel you never use? There's a new Podcasts widget available now (it's actually a pretty cool addition for podcast fans).

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

A 6,800-ton South Korean ferry was hoisted to the surface last week nearly three years after it capsized and sank in violent seas off the country's southwestern coast, an emotional moment for the nation as it searches for closure to one of its deadliest disasters. More than 300 people — most of whom were students on a high school trip — died when the Sewol sank on April 16, 2014, touching off an outpouring of national grief and soul searching about long-ignored public safety and regulatory failures.

Northeast Australia braces for cyclone, thousands flee to higher ground

Northeast Australia braces for cyclone, thousands flee to higher ground

By Tom Westbrook SYDNEY (Reuters) - Thousands of Australians fled their homes on Monday as a powerful cyclone bore down on coastal towns in Queensland, where authorities urged 30,000 people to evacuate low lying areas most at risk from tidal surges and winds of up to 300 km per hour (185 mph). Cyclone Debbie is expected to gather strength before making landfall in the northeast state early on Tuesday, with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology forecasting a category four storm, just one rung below the most dangerous wind speed level. The growing alarm persuaded the state government on Monday to warn some 25,000 people living in parts of Mackay, a city 950 kilometers (590 miles) north of the state capital Brisbane, to head south to higher ground.

Photos of the day - March 26, 2017

Photos of the day - March 26, 2017

A man waves traditional daggers, or jambiyas, as he attends with supporters of the Houthi movement and Yemen’s former president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, a rally to mark the two-year anniversary since the military intervention by a Saudi-led coalition, in Sanaa, Yemen; police officers detain an opposition supporter during a rally in Vladivostok, Russia; Balinese people carry giant effigies in the form of the devil, whose local name is “Ogoh-ogoh,” during a parade before Nyepi Day, the Balinese Day of Silence, marking the Balinese Hindu New Year in Gianyar, a regency in Bali, Indonesia. ...

Ted Koppel to Sean Hannity: You’re bad for America

Ted Koppel to Sean Hannity: You’re bad for America

Ted Koppel says Fox News host Sean Hannity is bad for America. On “CBS Sunday Morning,” the veteran newsman told Hannity that the audience he attracts is unable to distinguish between the divisive political rhetoric that marked the 2016 presidential campaign and the truth. “You have attracted people who are determined that ideology is more important than facts,” Koppel told Hannity.

Brazil tainted meat: Three key markets resume imports

Brazil tainted meat: Three key markets resume imports

Brasília (AFP) - Brazil won a major victory Saturday in the fight to restore credibility amid a tainted meat scandal, with key markets China, Egypt and Chile lifting their bans on its products. The three countries, which had totally closed their markets to Brazilian meat at the beginning of the week, said they would open them to all but imports from the 21 Brazilian processing plants under investigation. About 20 countries this week -- including the European Union, Japan and Mexico -- closed fully or partially their doors to Brazilian meat imports, whose sales brought in more than $13 billion to the Brazilian economy in 2016.

With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

When Singapore’s first prime minister, Lee Kuan Yew, passed away in 2015, 16-year-old Amos Yee made an obscenity-filled YouTube video denouncing the late leader as a “tyrant.” That and other postings earned him a four-week jail sentence for “wounding religious feelings and obscenity.” Not long after, he earned another six-week sentence for derogatory comments on Islam and Christianity. On Friday, US Immigration Judge Samuel B. Cole granted asylum to Mr. Yee, now 18, who flew to Chicago in December. “His prosecution, detention, and general maltreatment at the hands of the Singapore authorities constitute persecution,” Judge Cole ruled.

Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

When it was released last fall, Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 was the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. Unfortunately though, the Galaxy Note 7 was literally the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. A poor battery design caused dozens of phones to explode while being charged — and in some cases, while unplugged and in use — causing property damage and even injuring some users in the process. As a result, Samsung was forced to issue an unprecedented global recall, asking everyone around the world who purchased the phone to return or exchange it as soon as possible. Most of the potentially destructive smartphones have been collected by now. Since the phone was so impressive, however, a small percentage of holdouts have refused to give up their precious Note 7 handsets. We're not sure why Samsung waited as long as it did, but the company is finally taking its final step in ensuring that the Note 7 cannot do anymore damage. According to South Korean news site Yonhap News, Samsung will take steps next week to completely disable any remaining Galaxy Note 7 smartphones that may still be in use. The company said some time ago that 97% of all Note 7 phones have been reclaimed by the company. With more than 1 million handsets sold before Samsung discontinued the phone, however, that leaves tens of thousands of Note 7 handsets still in users' hands. According to the report, Samsung plans to issue a mandatory software update that will completely prevent any remaining Galaxy Note 7 devices from holding a charge. As a result, the phones will no longer be able to power on unless they are plugged in. Samsung and its carrier partners issued a similar software update in the US late last year and in early 2017, and now any remaining markets where the Note 7 might still be in use will get the update. Diehard Samsung fans who were holding onto their Note 7 phones won't have to wait very long before their soon-to-be crippled Note 7 phones are replaced. Samsung will unveil its new Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ flagship phones on Wednesday, and they'll be released about a month later.

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago

The medieval man was buried along with hundreds of others in a graveyard underneath what is now the Old Divinity School building of St. John's College at the University of Cambridge, in the United Kingdom. By studying his remains and piecing together his facial features and biological history, archeologists said they hope to understand the lives of anonymous poor people in the 13th century. "Most historical records are about well-off people and especially their financial and legal transactions," study lead researcher John Robb, a professor of archaeology at the University of Cambridge, said in a statement.

Iran strikes back at US with 'reciprocal' sanctions

Iran strikes back at US with 'reciprocal' sanctions

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran on Sunday sanctioned what it described as 15 American companies, alleging they support terrorism, repression and Israel's occupation of land Palestinians want for a future state, likely in retaliation for sanctions earlier announced by the U.S.

United Airlines bars teenage girls in leggings from flight

United Airlines bars teenage girls in leggings from flight

"The passengers this morning were United pass riders who were not in compliance with our dress code policy for company benefit travel," the airline said on Twitter as the incident Thanwent viral on social media. In another tweet made in response to a question from a social media user, the airline said: "Casual attire for ticketed passengers is fine. United pass travelers are company employees or family members of employees.

Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains

Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Golf ball-sized hail and powerful winds are expected to roll through parts of the Southern Plains late Sunday, marking the latest round of turbulent weather across the Midwest and South, forecasters said.

Seven students, one teacher killed in Japan avalanche

Seven students, one teacher killed in Japan avalanche

An avalanche Monday killed seven Japanese high school students and a teacher on a mountain-climbing outing, and injured 40 more. More than 100 troops were deployed in a major rescue mission after the avalanche hit ski slopes in Tochigi prefecture north of Tokyo. A total of 52 students and 11 teachers from seven high schools were on a three-day mountaineering expedition when disaster struck.

Syrian rebels resume withdrawal from last Homs bastion: monitor

Syrian rebels resume withdrawal from last Homs bastion: monitor

Hundreds of rebels left their last bastion in Syria's Homs city on Monday, resuming an evacuation expected to be among the largest of its kind under a Russian-backed deal with the government, state media and a monitor said. Heavy fighting between rebel groups and the army further north in Hama province over the weekend had delayed their departure from the city's al-Waer district, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. The evacuation began last week with the Syrian government shuttling hundreds of people from the district in Homs, which was an early center of the 2011 uprising that spiraled into war.

Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

This past Friday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk dashed the hopes and dreams of prospective Model 3 owners with just a few simple tweets. Tempering expectations, Musk emphasized that Tesla's upcoming Model 3 will not be more advanced -- in any capacity -- than the company's flagship Model S. "Model 3 is just a smaller, more affordable version of Model S [with] less range & power & fewer features," Musk said. "Model S has more advanced technology." Musk later added that the Model 3 will not feature the elegant "auto extend handles" Tesla introduced on the Model S. While Muks's comments here might seem obvious, the reality is that some of the hype and speculation surrounding the Model 3 had reached bizarre levels in recent months. Case in point: because the Model 3 prototype Tesla unveiled last year lacked an instrument panel with traditional gauges for items like speed, range and other pertinent information, many Tesla enthusiasts began wondering if Tesla had some special plan for the dashboard, with many believing that a heads up display (HUD) on the windshield was an inevitability. As a quick reminder, here's a photo of the Model 3 interior taken from the company's special event last year. As is evident below, the only location a driver can access information is the 15-inch touchscreen in the center console. In another shot, we can see that Model 3 drivers will have to divert their eyes to the upper left hand corner of the display in order to ascertain their current speed. Alas, Tesla doesn't have any secret plans to implement some advanced HUD on the Model 3. In a tweet addressing the matter, Musk said that as cars become more autonomous, the need for a suite of information at the ready becomes less of an issue. https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/845285846936825856 Still, we're still a long ways off before fully self driving cars become commonplace. In turn, it remains to be seen if the Model 3 design in its current incarnation is perhaps too far ahead of its time. Besides, autonomous driving features for the Model 3 will cost extra, meaning that not every Model 3 on the road will be able to take advantage of the vehicle's self-driving capabilities. One question about the Model 3 that remains unanswered is whether or not can expect any changes to the car's steering wheel design. This past April, Musk boasted that the final design will be akin to a spaceship. https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/716729420078133248 To answer that, we'll probably have to wait until next July when Tesla is planning the next phase of its Model 3 reveal.

Washington's cherry blossoms bloom despite cold snap

Washington's cherry blossoms bloom despite cold snap

A mild winter followed by a spate of cold weather in Washington, made its mark on the city’s cherry blossoms, but the annual festival delighted first-time visitors on Sunday. The cherry blossom trees were a gift from Japan to the United States in 1912. The cherry blossom trees currently grow in three National Park Service locations, including the Tidal Basin, Hains Point and on the Washington Monument grounds.

Bulgarian center-right GERB wins most votes in election

Bulgarian center-right GERB wins most votes in election

By Tsvetelia Tsolova and Angel Krasimirov SOFIA (Reuters) - Bulgaria's center-right GERB party narrowly won a parliamentary election on Sunday, giving it a chance to form another government after leader Boiko Borisov resigned as prime minister in November, triggering the snap poll. The GERB party won 33 percent of the vote, the Balkan country's third in just 4 years, with the leftist Socialists trailing on 27.2 percent, partial official results with 26 percent of the ballots counted showed. "The result of the vote shows that GERB is obliged to form a government," said Borisov.

Family of missing ex-FBI agent files lawsuit against Iran

Family of missing ex-FBI agent files lawsuit against Iran

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The family of a former FBI agent who went missing in Iran a decade ago on an unauthorized CIA assignment has filed a lawsuit against the Islamic Republic, accusing it of using "cold, cynical and false denials" to torture his loved ones.

Why is Colorado risking hundreds of millions to protect its marijuana industry?

Why is Colorado risking hundreds of millions to protect its marijuana industry?

Colorado's state legislature is considering an unusual plan to defend the state's marijuana industry from a federal crackdown under the Trump administration. The bill would allow growers and sellers to reclassify their recreational marijuana as medical “based on a business need due to a change in local, state, or federal law or enforcement policy.” The strategy is meant to keep marijuana businesses afloat if the federal government comes after them, even if it means the state losing hundreds of millions of dollars in taxes. The bill represents a shift in how states might respond to what marijuana advocates say are an over-simplification of cannabis policy by the Trump administration.

5 Easy Ways to Make Fast Cash

5 Easy Ways to Make Fast Cash

For aluminum cans, you'll generally get 40 cents per pound, and maybe 50 cents a pound if you bring in 100 pounds or more. If you have old computer equipment, you could also recycle that for money -- not much, though.

Cities and monuments switch off for Earth Hour

Cities and monuments switch off for Earth Hour

The Empire State Building and United Nations headquarters in New York joined other iconic buildings and monuments around the world plunging into darkness for sixty minutes on Saturday to mark Earth Hour and draw attention to climate change. The Eiffel Tower, the Kremlin, the Acropolis in Athens and Sydney's Opera House also dimmed their lights as millions of people from some 170 countries and territories were expected to take part in Earth Hour, the annual bid to highlight global warming caused by the burning of coal, oil and gas to drive cars and power plants.

White House threatens to bypass hardline conservatives on tax reform

White House threatens to bypass hardline conservatives on tax reform

By Lindsay Dunsmuir and Doina Chiacu WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Fresh off a defeat on U.S. healthcare legislation, the White House warned rebellious conservative lawmakers that they should get behind President Donald Trump's agenda or he may bypass them on future legislative fights, including tax reform. The threat by White House chief of staff Reince Priebus to build a broad coalition on tax reform that could include moderate Democrats came as the Republican head of the tax-writing committee in the House of Representatives said he hoped to move a tax bill through his panel this spring. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady said his committee had been working on tax reform in parallel with the failed healthcare reform push.

Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

Anyone who's played a futuristic shooter since the dawn of video games knows that when you see something called a "railgun" you're in for a real treat. Well, the US Navy built a railgun of its very own, and it just showed off its remarkably powerful creation in a new video of its test firing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=106&v=Pi-BDIu_umo Railguns like the one the Navy has built trade chemical propellants like gunpowder for the sheer power of electricity, generating extremely strong magnetic fields to push a projectile down a set of rails and out the end of the barrel. It might not sound particularly efficient, but the speeds that railgun projectiles can achieve put traditional cannons to shame. The Navy's massive weapon, for example, launches its rounds at a whopping 4,500 mph. Additionally, the projectiles launched by the railgun do their damage not by exploding, but simply by striking their target while moving at such a high speed, quite literally tearing apart anything they come into contact with. For most of their history, railguns have been more fiction than science, and their practicality and reliability has repeatedly been questioned over time. The size of the device itself is typically massive, owing to the large and complex electronic components required to supply the necessary power. However, there are also some pretty fantastic benefits of the non-explosive rounds, such as much less chance of unexploded ordnance causing problems either on the ship or vehicle firing the weapon, or on the battlefield after a skirmish has ended.

One killed in shooting on Las Vegas Strip, suspect surrenders

One killed in shooting on Las Vegas Strip, suspect surrenders

One person was killed Saturday and another wounded in a shooting on a bus on the busy Las Vegas strip, police said, with a suspect later surrendering himself to authorities. Police closed a section of South Las Vegas Boulevard for hours after the shooting as a standoff unfolded with the suspect, who had barricaded himself on the bus. "The suspect in the bus has surrendered to officers, and is in custody," the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department said on its Twitter account.

Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against Assad

Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against Assad

By Tom Miles GENEVA (Reuters) - The Syrian opposition rejects terrorism and is "fed up" with banned militants but they cannot be stopped if Syria continues evicting populations of besieged areas, opposition negotiator Basma Kodmani said on Sunday. Syria's government has always cited the fight against terrorism to justify its part in a six-year war that has killed hundreds of thousands, and brands all its opponents and their backers as terrorists and sponsors of terror. The opposition's chief negotiator Nasr al-Hariri, who is trying to negotiate an end the rule of President Bashar al-Assad, began this month by saying its stance against terrorism was proven on the battlefield and not mere words.

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People

The research used detailed brain scans to compare the brains of people who were blind to the brains of people who were not blind. Such brain changes arise because the brain has a "plastic" quality, meaning that it can make new connections among neurons, the study said. "Even in the case of being profoundly blind, the brain rewires itself in a manner to use the information at its disposal so that it can interact with the environment in a more effective manner," senior study author Dr. Lotfi Merabet, the director of the Laboratory for Visual Neuroplasticity at Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, said in a statement.

Photos of the day - March 25, 2017

Photos of the day - March 25, 2017

A woman dressed as “Europa" performs during a rally in Berlin marking the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome; a woman, pushed to the ground by police, tries to defends herself as the police detain an activist during an opposition rally in Minsk, Belarus; Pope Francis waves to the faithful from the Popemobile in Milan, Italy, as Cardinal Angelo Scola, the archbishop of Milan, looks on, after the Angelus in Duomo Square. These are some of the photos of the day. (AP/EPA/Getty/Reuters)

security

Trump decides yes, he can stay mad at Freedom Caucus for health care defeat

Trump decides yes, he can stay mad at Freedom Caucus for health care defeat

President Trump did not blame House Republicans for failing to pass the bill to repeal and replace Obamacare after it was abruptly pulled. “Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!” Trump tweeted early Sunday. Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!

Gold coin worth $4 million stolen from Berlin museum

Gold coin worth $4 million stolen from Berlin museum

A Canadian gold coin named "Big Maple Leaf" which bears the image of Queen Elizabeth II was stolen in the early hours of Monday morning from Berlin's Bode Museum. Given the high purity of the gold used in the coin, its material value is estimated to be $4 million. The museum said on its website that the coin was issued by the Royal Canadian Mint in 2007 and that it was featured in the Guinness Book of Records for its "unmatched" degree of purity.

Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrike

Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrike

WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. counterterrorism airstrike earlier this month in Afghanistan killed an al-Qaida leader responsible for a deadly hotel attack in Islamabad in 2008 and the 2009 attack on a bus carrying the Sri Lankan cricket team, the Pentagon said Saturday.

New York skyscrapers adapt to climate change

New York skyscrapers adapt to climate change

With a skyline crowded with ever-more luxury towers, the construction of another Manhattan skyscraper wouldn't normally be remarkable. Planned just after deadly Hurricane Sandy ravaged New York in October 2012 -- sounding another alarm about the mounting effects of climate change -- it was designed with new threats in mind, reflecting how the real estate world is evolving to account for global warming, in contrast to President Donald Trump's moves to roll back environmental protection. The huge storm killed more than 40 people in New York, paralyzing the US financial capital for days.

Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?

Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?

Infowars owner and long-time conspiracy theorist Alex Jones admitted that his site falsely reported and commented on the debunked “Pizzagate” controversy, a theory that alleged that Comet Ping Pong, a Washington, D.C., pizza restaurant, had played a role in a child-sex-trafficking ring that also involved Hillary Clinton. Apologizing to the restaurant’s owner, James Alefantis, Mr. Jones issued a statement Friday. “I want our viewers and listeners to know that we regret any negative impact our commentaries may have had on Mr. Alefantis, Comet Ping Pong, or its employees,” he said.

Florida man kills one, wounds five in 'horrific' shooting: police

Florida man kills one, wounds five in 'horrific' shooting: police

A man killed his girlfriend and wounded five other people, including two children and a high school student at a bus stop, during a shooting spree in central Florida on Monday, police said. Police say Allen D. Cashe opened fire a few hours after officers had been called to break up a dispute over a vehicle between him and his girlfriend, who was not identified. Cashe, 31, killed the girlfriend and critically wounded her two sons, ages 7 and 8, and her father, Sanford Police spokeswoman Bianca Gillett said.

The 8 best new features Apple added to your iPhone in iOS 10.3

The 8 best new features Apple added to your iPhone in iOS 10.3

After releasing roughly 437 different iOS 10.3 betas to developers over the past few weeks alone, Apple has finally released iOS 10.3 to the public. The new mobile software is available as an over the air (OTA) download or as a download through iTunes on a Mac or Windows PC, and it's compatible with 19 different Apple devices dating as far back as the iPhone 5, 4th-generation iPad, iPad mini 2, and the 6th-generation iPod touch. Should you be excited? Should you rush to download and install iOS 10.3 on your iPhone or iPad as soon as possible? In this post, we'll run through all of the top new features Apple introduced in iOS 10.3. Find My AirPods: The most talked-about new feature in iOS 10.3 is Find My AirPods, which obviously only matters if you own a pair of Apple's hot new AirPods. They're still next to impossible to find in Apple stores, so Amazon is really your only hope if you want AirPods anytime soon. There's now a new option in the Find My iPhone app that can track down your AirPods, but it's nowhere near as accurate or as useful as it is for iPhones and iPads since AirPods don't have a GPS radio or the ability to connect to any networks. Instead, this is basically a log that will show you the last location where your iPhone was connected to your AirPods. If you forget your AirPods somewhere, this nifty new feature could definitely help you find them. If you haven't connected to them in a while or if they're stolen, you're pretty much out of luck. App Transition Animations: You might not even notice this one, but Apple made a subtle change to the transition animations that are shown as apps open and close in iOS 10.3. They now have slightly more rounded edges, which is definitely not a big deal. But they also seem to move a bit faster, which is a big deal since it speeds up the interface a bit. Weather in Maps: In the Maps app, users can now 3D Touch the weather icon to see a local forecast for the area. Apple ID Profile: There is now a new Apple ID profile section in the Settings app that you'll see at the very top of the first screen. It gives you access to a single page where you'll find your full contact profile, security settings, payment information, iCloud account details, App Store settings, Family Sharing settings and a bit more. Also of note, this page displays every Apple device where you're currently signed in. iCloud Storage: You'll now find a new section at the top of your iCloud settings page with a breakdown of how your iCloud storage is being used. New File System: This is a big one, though it takes place completely behind the scenes so you won't even realize it's happening. Installing iOS 10.3 will automatically update your iPhone or iPad to use Apple File System (APFS) instead of HFS+. APFS is better optimized for NAND flash storage so files can be accessed more quickly, and it also supports stronger encryption. Voice Call Continuity for Verizon: This is obviously a new feature that will only be appreciated by Verizon Wireless subscribers, but iCloud calling features are now finally supported if you use Verizon. That means you can make or receive voice calls on your Mac, iPad, iPod touch, and Apple Watch. Podcasts Widget: You know that widgets panel you never use? There's a new Podcasts widget available now (it's actually a pretty cool addition for podcast fans).

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

A 6,800-ton South Korean ferry was hoisted to the surface last week nearly three years after it capsized and sank in violent seas off the country's southwestern coast, an emotional moment for the nation as it searches for closure to one of its deadliest disasters. More than 300 people — most of whom were students on a high school trip — died when the Sewol sank on April 16, 2014, touching off an outpouring of national grief and soul searching about long-ignored public safety and regulatory failures.

Northeast Australia braces for cyclone, thousands flee to higher ground

Northeast Australia braces for cyclone, thousands flee to higher ground

By Tom Westbrook SYDNEY (Reuters) - Thousands of Australians fled their homes on Monday as a powerful cyclone bore down on coastal towns in Queensland, where authorities urged 30,000 people to evacuate low lying areas most at risk from tidal surges and winds of up to 300 km per hour (185 mph). Cyclone Debbie is expected to gather strength before making landfall in the northeast state early on Tuesday, with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology forecasting a category four storm, just one rung below the most dangerous wind speed level. The growing alarm persuaded the state government on Monday to warn some 25,000 people living in parts of Mackay, a city 950 kilometers (590 miles) north of the state capital Brisbane, to head south to higher ground.

Photos of the day - March 26, 2017

Photos of the day - March 26, 2017

A man waves traditional daggers, or jambiyas, as he attends with supporters of the Houthi movement and Yemen’s former president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, a rally to mark the two-year anniversary since the military intervention by a Saudi-led coalition, in Sanaa, Yemen; police officers detain an opposition supporter during a rally in Vladivostok, Russia; Balinese people carry giant effigies in the form of the devil, whose local name is “Ogoh-ogoh,” during a parade before Nyepi Day, the Balinese Day of Silence, marking the Balinese Hindu New Year in Gianyar, a regency in Bali, Indonesia. ...

Ted Koppel to Sean Hannity: You’re bad for America

Ted Koppel to Sean Hannity: You’re bad for America

Ted Koppel says Fox News host Sean Hannity is bad for America. On “CBS Sunday Morning,” the veteran newsman told Hannity that the audience he attracts is unable to distinguish between the divisive political rhetoric that marked the 2016 presidential campaign and the truth. “You have attracted people who are determined that ideology is more important than facts,” Koppel told Hannity.

Brazil tainted meat: Three key markets resume imports

Brazil tainted meat: Three key markets resume imports

Brasília (AFP) - Brazil won a major victory Saturday in the fight to restore credibility amid a tainted meat scandal, with key markets China, Egypt and Chile lifting their bans on its products. The three countries, which had totally closed their markets to Brazilian meat at the beginning of the week, said they would open them to all but imports from the 21 Brazilian processing plants under investigation. About 20 countries this week -- including the European Union, Japan and Mexico -- closed fully or partially their doors to Brazilian meat imports, whose sales brought in more than $13 billion to the Brazilian economy in 2016.

With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

When Singapore’s first prime minister, Lee Kuan Yew, passed away in 2015, 16-year-old Amos Yee made an obscenity-filled YouTube video denouncing the late leader as a “tyrant.” That and other postings earned him a four-week jail sentence for “wounding religious feelings and obscenity.” Not long after, he earned another six-week sentence for derogatory comments on Islam and Christianity. On Friday, US Immigration Judge Samuel B. Cole granted asylum to Mr. Yee, now 18, who flew to Chicago in December. “His prosecution, detention, and general maltreatment at the hands of the Singapore authorities constitute persecution,” Judge Cole ruled.

Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

When it was released last fall, Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 was the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. Unfortunately though, the Galaxy Note 7 was literally the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. A poor battery design caused dozens of phones to explode while being charged — and in some cases, while unplugged and in use — causing property damage and even injuring some users in the process. As a result, Samsung was forced to issue an unprecedented global recall, asking everyone around the world who purchased the phone to return or exchange it as soon as possible. Most of the potentially destructive smartphones have been collected by now. Since the phone was so impressive, however, a small percentage of holdouts have refused to give up their precious Note 7 handsets. We're not sure why Samsung waited as long as it did, but the company is finally taking its final step in ensuring that the Note 7 cannot do anymore damage. According to South Korean news site Yonhap News, Samsung will take steps next week to completely disable any remaining Galaxy Note 7 smartphones that may still be in use. The company said some time ago that 97% of all Note 7 phones have been reclaimed by the company. With more than 1 million handsets sold before Samsung discontinued the phone, however, that leaves tens of thousands of Note 7 handsets still in users' hands. According to the report, Samsung plans to issue a mandatory software update that will completely prevent any remaining Galaxy Note 7 devices from holding a charge. As a result, the phones will no longer be able to power on unless they are plugged in. Samsung and its carrier partners issued a similar software update in the US late last year and in early 2017, and now any remaining markets where the Note 7 might still be in use will get the update. Diehard Samsung fans who were holding onto their Note 7 phones won't have to wait very long before their soon-to-be crippled Note 7 phones are replaced. Samsung will unveil its new Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ flagship phones on Wednesday, and they'll be released about a month later.

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago

The medieval man was buried along with hundreds of others in a graveyard underneath what is now the Old Divinity School building of St. John's College at the University of Cambridge, in the United Kingdom. By studying his remains and piecing together his facial features and biological history, archeologists said they hope to understand the lives of anonymous poor people in the 13th century. "Most historical records are about well-off people and especially their financial and legal transactions," study lead researcher John Robb, a professor of archaeology at the University of Cambridge, said in a statement.

Iran strikes back at US with 'reciprocal' sanctions

Iran strikes back at US with 'reciprocal' sanctions

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran on Sunday sanctioned what it described as 15 American companies, alleging they support terrorism, repression and Israel's occupation of land Palestinians want for a future state, likely in retaliation for sanctions earlier announced by the U.S.

United Airlines bars teenage girls in leggings from flight

United Airlines bars teenage girls in leggings from flight

"The passengers this morning were United pass riders who were not in compliance with our dress code policy for company benefit travel," the airline said on Twitter as the incident Thanwent viral on social media. In another tweet made in response to a question from a social media user, the airline said: "Casual attire for ticketed passengers is fine. United pass travelers are company employees or family members of employees.

Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains

Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Golf ball-sized hail and powerful winds are expected to roll through parts of the Southern Plains late Sunday, marking the latest round of turbulent weather across the Midwest and South, forecasters said.

Seven students, one teacher killed in Japan avalanche

Seven students, one teacher killed in Japan avalanche

An avalanche Monday killed seven Japanese high school students and a teacher on a mountain-climbing outing, and injured 40 more. More than 100 troops were deployed in a major rescue mission after the avalanche hit ski slopes in Tochigi prefecture north of Tokyo. A total of 52 students and 11 teachers from seven high schools were on a three-day mountaineering expedition when disaster struck.

Syrian rebels resume withdrawal from last Homs bastion: monitor

Syrian rebels resume withdrawal from last Homs bastion: monitor

Hundreds of rebels left their last bastion in Syria's Homs city on Monday, resuming an evacuation expected to be among the largest of its kind under a Russian-backed deal with the government, state media and a monitor said. Heavy fighting between rebel groups and the army further north in Hama province over the weekend had delayed their departure from the city's al-Waer district, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. The evacuation began last week with the Syrian government shuttling hundreds of people from the district in Homs, which was an early center of the 2011 uprising that spiraled into war.

Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

This past Friday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk dashed the hopes and dreams of prospective Model 3 owners with just a few simple tweets. Tempering expectations, Musk emphasized that Tesla's upcoming Model 3 will not be more advanced -- in any capacity -- than the company's flagship Model S. "Model 3 is just a smaller, more affordable version of Model S [with] less range & power & fewer features," Musk said. "Model S has more advanced technology." Musk later added that the Model 3 will not feature the elegant "auto extend handles" Tesla introduced on the Model S. While Muks's comments here might seem obvious, the reality is that some of the hype and speculation surrounding the Model 3 had reached bizarre levels in recent months. Case in point: because the Model 3 prototype Tesla unveiled last year lacked an instrument panel with traditional gauges for items like speed, range and other pertinent information, many Tesla enthusiasts began wondering if Tesla had some special plan for the dashboard, with many believing that a heads up display (HUD) on the windshield was an inevitability. As a quick reminder, here's a photo of the Model 3 interior taken from the company's special event last year. As is evident below, the only location a driver can access information is the 15-inch touchscreen in the center console. In another shot, we can see that Model 3 drivers will have to divert their eyes to the upper left hand corner of the display in order to ascertain their current speed. Alas, Tesla doesn't have any secret plans to implement some advanced HUD on the Model 3. In a tweet addressing the matter, Musk said that as cars become more autonomous, the need for a suite of information at the ready becomes less of an issue. https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/845285846936825856 Still, we're still a long ways off before fully self driving cars become commonplace. In turn, it remains to be seen if the Model 3 design in its current incarnation is perhaps too far ahead of its time. Besides, autonomous driving features for the Model 3 will cost extra, meaning that not every Model 3 on the road will be able to take advantage of the vehicle's self-driving capabilities. One question about the Model 3 that remains unanswered is whether or not can expect any changes to the car's steering wheel design. This past April, Musk boasted that the final design will be akin to a spaceship. https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/716729420078133248 To answer that, we'll probably have to wait until next July when Tesla is planning the next phase of its Model 3 reveal.

Washington's cherry blossoms bloom despite cold snap

Washington's cherry blossoms bloom despite cold snap

A mild winter followed by a spate of cold weather in Washington, made its mark on the city’s cherry blossoms, but the annual festival delighted first-time visitors on Sunday. The cherry blossom trees were a gift from Japan to the United States in 1912. The cherry blossom trees currently grow in three National Park Service locations, including the Tidal Basin, Hains Point and on the Washington Monument grounds.

Bulgarian center-right GERB wins most votes in election

Bulgarian center-right GERB wins most votes in election

By Tsvetelia Tsolova and Angel Krasimirov SOFIA (Reuters) - Bulgaria's center-right GERB party narrowly won a parliamentary election on Sunday, giving it a chance to form another government after leader Boiko Borisov resigned as prime minister in November, triggering the snap poll. The GERB party won 33 percent of the vote, the Balkan country's third in just 4 years, with the leftist Socialists trailing on 27.2 percent, partial official results with 26 percent of the ballots counted showed. "The result of the vote shows that GERB is obliged to form a government," said Borisov.

Family of missing ex-FBI agent files lawsuit against Iran

Family of missing ex-FBI agent files lawsuit against Iran

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The family of a former FBI agent who went missing in Iran a decade ago on an unauthorized CIA assignment has filed a lawsuit against the Islamic Republic, accusing it of using "cold, cynical and false denials" to torture his loved ones.

Why is Colorado risking hundreds of millions to protect its marijuana industry?

Why is Colorado risking hundreds of millions to protect its marijuana industry?

Colorado's state legislature is considering an unusual plan to defend the state's marijuana industry from a federal crackdown under the Trump administration. The bill would allow growers and sellers to reclassify their recreational marijuana as medical “based on a business need due to a change in local, state, or federal law or enforcement policy.” The strategy is meant to keep marijuana businesses afloat if the federal government comes after them, even if it means the state losing hundreds of millions of dollars in taxes. The bill represents a shift in how states might respond to what marijuana advocates say are an over-simplification of cannabis policy by the Trump administration.

5 Easy Ways to Make Fast Cash

5 Easy Ways to Make Fast Cash

For aluminum cans, you'll generally get 40 cents per pound, and maybe 50 cents a pound if you bring in 100 pounds or more. If you have old computer equipment, you could also recycle that for money -- not much, though.

Cities and monuments switch off for Earth Hour

Cities and monuments switch off for Earth Hour

The Empire State Building and United Nations headquarters in New York joined other iconic buildings and monuments around the world plunging into darkness for sixty minutes on Saturday to mark Earth Hour and draw attention to climate change. The Eiffel Tower, the Kremlin, the Acropolis in Athens and Sydney's Opera House also dimmed their lights as millions of people from some 170 countries and territories were expected to take part in Earth Hour, the annual bid to highlight global warming caused by the burning of coal, oil and gas to drive cars and power plants.

White House threatens to bypass hardline conservatives on tax reform

White House threatens to bypass hardline conservatives on tax reform

By Lindsay Dunsmuir and Doina Chiacu WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Fresh off a defeat on U.S. healthcare legislation, the White House warned rebellious conservative lawmakers that they should get behind President Donald Trump's agenda or he may bypass them on future legislative fights, including tax reform. The threat by White House chief of staff Reince Priebus to build a broad coalition on tax reform that could include moderate Democrats came as the Republican head of the tax-writing committee in the House of Representatives said he hoped to move a tax bill through his panel this spring. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady said his committee had been working on tax reform in parallel with the failed healthcare reform push.

Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

Anyone who's played a futuristic shooter since the dawn of video games knows that when you see something called a "railgun" you're in for a real treat. Well, the US Navy built a railgun of its very own, and it just showed off its remarkably powerful creation in a new video of its test firing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=106&v=Pi-BDIu_umo Railguns like the one the Navy has built trade chemical propellants like gunpowder for the sheer power of electricity, generating extremely strong magnetic fields to push a projectile down a set of rails and out the end of the barrel. It might not sound particularly efficient, but the speeds that railgun projectiles can achieve put traditional cannons to shame. The Navy's massive weapon, for example, launches its rounds at a whopping 4,500 mph. Additionally, the projectiles launched by the railgun do their damage not by exploding, but simply by striking their target while moving at such a high speed, quite literally tearing apart anything they come into contact with. For most of their history, railguns have been more fiction than science, and their practicality and reliability has repeatedly been questioned over time. The size of the device itself is typically massive, owing to the large and complex electronic components required to supply the necessary power. However, there are also some pretty fantastic benefits of the non-explosive rounds, such as much less chance of unexploded ordnance causing problems either on the ship or vehicle firing the weapon, or on the battlefield after a skirmish has ended.

One killed in shooting on Las Vegas Strip, suspect surrenders

One killed in shooting on Las Vegas Strip, suspect surrenders

One person was killed Saturday and another wounded in a shooting on a bus on the busy Las Vegas strip, police said, with a suspect later surrendering himself to authorities. Police closed a section of South Las Vegas Boulevard for hours after the shooting as a standoff unfolded with the suspect, who had barricaded himself on the bus. "The suspect in the bus has surrendered to officers, and is in custody," the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department said on its Twitter account.

Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against Assad

Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against Assad

By Tom Miles GENEVA (Reuters) - The Syrian opposition rejects terrorism and is "fed up" with banned militants but they cannot be stopped if Syria continues evicting populations of besieged areas, opposition negotiator Basma Kodmani said on Sunday. Syria's government has always cited the fight against terrorism to justify its part in a six-year war that has killed hundreds of thousands, and brands all its opponents and their backers as terrorists and sponsors of terror. The opposition's chief negotiator Nasr al-Hariri, who is trying to negotiate an end the rule of President Bashar al-Assad, began this month by saying its stance against terrorism was proven on the battlefield and not mere words.

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People

The research used detailed brain scans to compare the brains of people who were blind to the brains of people who were not blind. Such brain changes arise because the brain has a "plastic" quality, meaning that it can make new connections among neurons, the study said. "Even in the case of being profoundly blind, the brain rewires itself in a manner to use the information at its disposal so that it can interact with the environment in a more effective manner," senior study author Dr. Lotfi Merabet, the director of the Laboratory for Visual Neuroplasticity at Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, said in a statement.

Photos of the day - March 25, 2017

Photos of the day - March 25, 2017

A woman dressed as “Europa" performs during a rally in Berlin marking the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome; a woman, pushed to the ground by police, tries to defends herself as the police detain an activist during an opposition rally in Minsk, Belarus; Pope Francis waves to the faithful from the Popemobile in Milan, Italy, as Cardinal Angelo Scola, the archbishop of Milan, looks on, after the Angelus in Duomo Square. These are some of the photos of the day. (AP/EPA/Getty/Reuters)

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Trump decides yes, he can stay mad at Freedom Caucus for health care defeat

Trump decides yes, he can stay mad at Freedom Caucus for health care defeat

President Trump did not blame House Republicans for failing to pass the bill to repeal and replace Obamacare after it was abruptly pulled. “Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!” Trump tweeted early Sunday. Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!

Gold coin worth $4 million stolen from Berlin museum

Gold coin worth $4 million stolen from Berlin museum

A Canadian gold coin named "Big Maple Leaf" which bears the image of Queen Elizabeth II was stolen in the early hours of Monday morning from Berlin's Bode Museum. Given the high purity of the gold used in the coin, its material value is estimated to be $4 million. The museum said on its website that the coin was issued by the Royal Canadian Mint in 2007 and that it was featured in the Guinness Book of Records for its "unmatched" degree of purity.

Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrike

Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrike

WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. counterterrorism airstrike earlier this month in Afghanistan killed an al-Qaida leader responsible for a deadly hotel attack in Islamabad in 2008 and the 2009 attack on a bus carrying the Sri Lankan cricket team, the Pentagon said Saturday.

Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?

Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?

Infowars owner and long-time conspiracy theorist Alex Jones admitted that his site falsely reported and commented on the debunked “Pizzagate” controversy, a theory that alleged that Comet Ping Pong, a Washington, D.C., pizza restaurant, had played a role in a child-sex-trafficking ring that also involved Hillary Clinton. Apologizing to the restaurant’s owner, James Alefantis, Mr. Jones issued a statement Friday. “I want our viewers and listeners to know that we regret any negative impact our commentaries may have had on Mr. Alefantis, Comet Ping Pong, or its employees,” he said.

Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains

Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Golf ball-sized hail and powerful winds are expected to roll through parts of the Southern Plains late Sunday, marking the latest round of turbulent weather across the Midwest and South, forecasters said.

Protests nationwide bring thousands to Russia's streets

Protests nationwide bring thousands to Russia's streets

Russia’s opposition, often written off by critics as a small and irrelevant coterie of privileged urbanites, put on an impressive nationwide show of strength Sunday with scores of protest rallies spanning the vast country. Hundreds were arrested, including Alexei Navalny, the anti-corruption campaigner who is President Vladimir Putin’s most prominent critic.

After United Airlines incident, women share stories of being shamed for their clothing

After United Airlines incident, women share stories of being shamed for their clothing

In response to United Airline's legging-gate, women are speaking out.  Two young girls wearing leggings were banned from a flight on Sunday morning due to a violation of the airline's internal dress code. The situation, which was live-tweeted by activist Shannon Watts, sparked outrage from thousands on social media who called out the company for policing the girls' attire.   Author Dana Schwartz was one of those that spoke out against United Airlines, and asked women on Twitter to share their stories of feeling "embarrassed" or "sexualized" for the first time because of what they wore.  SEE ALSO: United Airlines bans 2 girls with leggings from flight because they weren't 'properly clothed' Ladies, when was the first time you were made to feel embarrassed and sexualized for what you wore? I was in 5th grade, shorts too short. — Dana Schwartz (@DanaSchwartzzz) March 26, 2017 "It was the 2nd to last day of school. HOT out. I was a beanpole, everything was short on me. They made me call my mom to bring pants," she recalled. "AND THEN when you DO grow up you reach the fun point when you're embarrassed to go out with your dad in public bc people think you're dating," Schwartz explained.  These tweets sparked countless stories from women sharing similar experiences.  @DanaSchwartzzz "We must! We must! We must increase our bust! The bigger the better, the tighter the sweater, the boys depend on us!" (2) — RealMarjo (@RealMarjo) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz early example, though not the first: when my male boss told me (14) that I'd be really hot when I was 16 — Rani Molla (@ranimolla) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz 4th or 5th grade. Gray leggings were inappropriate. Nothing else was clean, but I didn't tell them that — Erin El Issa (@Erin_El_Issa) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz 5th grade: dance pants were too tight for school. 8th grade: friend & I wore matching tube socks & skirts. Forced to change. — Jordon Cloud Rahmil (@jordoncloud) March 26, 2017 In my HS girls had to wear oversized t-shirts that said "I violated the dress code" if tank tops/leggings/etc. were deemed "inappropriate" https://t.co/DC7KB4pnQ4 — Laura Wagner (@Laura_M_Wagner) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz 3rd grade. My arms are really long, and the hem of my shorts wasn't far enough down. — dan stevens real fan (@whas2001) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz at 14, was told small town moms were gossiping about me because I showed 1" of my midriff. hadn't even kissed a boy ever. — Alyssa Galella (@woodlandalyssa) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz I almost didn't get to partipate in my 8th grade graduation because my dress had straps that showed 2 much shoulder. 1981. pic.twitter.com/QXHnPNRZcV — Cami MacNamara (@webcami) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz I once heard a church mom ask my little sisters if they were going to "dress modest this summer, or like your sister Emily" — Emily Joy (@emilyjoypoetry) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz Age 10, end-of-year dance recital, they measured us at the beginning of the year & refused to let us wear bras for dance — TofuForBrains (@TofuForBrains) March 26, 2017 @DanaSchwartzzz First day of high school sent home for wearing dress with thin straps that revealed I had no bra straps. Didn't need a bra! — MosaicMoods ☮️ (@DianaMaus) March 26, 2017 Carina MacKenzie summed up the majority of stories on the thread pretty succinctly:  @DanaSchwartzzz I honestly don't ever remember NOT feeling that way. — Carina MacKenzie (@cadlymack) March 26, 2017 WATCH: Airbus is redefining the future of flying.

One killed in shooting on Las Vegas Strip, suspect surrenders

One killed in shooting on Las Vegas Strip, suspect surrenders

One person was killed Saturday and another wounded in a shooting on a bus on the busy Las Vegas strip, police said, with a suspect later surrendering himself to authorities. Police closed a section of South Las Vegas Boulevard for hours after the shooting as a standoff unfolded with the suspect, who had barricaded himself on the bus. "The suspect in the bus has surrendered to officers, and is in custody," the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department said on its Twitter account.

Syrian rebels resume withdrawal from last Homs bastion: monitor

Syrian rebels resume withdrawal from last Homs bastion: monitor

Hundreds of rebels left their last bastion in Syria's Homs city on Monday, resuming an evacuation expected to be among the largest of its kind under a Russian-backed deal with the government, state media and a monitor said. Heavy fighting between rebel groups and the army further north in Hama province over the weekend had delayed their departure from the city's al-Waer district, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. The evacuation began last week with the Syrian government shuttling hundreds of people from the district in Homs, which was an early center of the 2011 uprising that spiraled into war.

Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

When it was released last fall, Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 was the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. Unfortunately though, the Galaxy Note 7 was literally the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. A poor battery design caused dozens of phones to explode while being charged — and in some cases, while unplugged and in use — causing property damage and even injuring some users in the process. As a result, Samsung was forced to issue an unprecedented global recall, asking everyone around the world who purchased the phone to return or exchange it as soon as possible. Most of the potentially destructive smartphones have been collected by now. Since the phone was so impressive, however, a small percentage of holdouts have refused to give up their precious Note 7 handsets. We're not sure why Samsung waited as long as it did, but the company is finally taking its final step in ensuring that the Note 7 cannot do anymore damage. According to South Korean news site Yonhap News, Samsung will take steps next week to completely disable any remaining Galaxy Note 7 smartphones that may still be in use. The company said some time ago that 97% of all Note 7 phones have been reclaimed by the company. With more than 1 million handsets sold before Samsung discontinued the phone, however, that leaves tens of thousands of Note 7 handsets still in users' hands. According to the report, Samsung plans to issue a mandatory software update that will completely prevent any remaining Galaxy Note 7 devices from holding a charge. As a result, the phones will no longer be able to power on unless they are plugged in. Samsung and its carrier partners issued a similar software update in the US late last year and in early 2017, and now any remaining markets where the Note 7 might still be in use will get the update. Diehard Samsung fans who were holding onto their Note 7 phones won't have to wait very long before their soon-to-be crippled Note 7 phones are replaced. Samsung will unveil its new Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ flagship phones on Wednesday, and they'll be released about a month later.

Northeast Australia braces for cyclone, thousands flee to higher ground

Northeast Australia braces for cyclone, thousands flee to higher ground

By Tom Westbrook SYDNEY (Reuters) - Thousands of Australians fled their homes on Monday as a powerful cyclone bore down on coastal towns in Queensland, where authorities urged 30,000 people to evacuate low lying areas most at risk from tidal surges and winds of up to 300 km per hour (185 mph). Cyclone Debbie is expected to gather strength before making landfall in the northeast state early on Tuesday, with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology forecasting a category four storm, just one rung below the most dangerous wind speed level. The growing alarm persuaded the state government on Monday to warn some 25,000 people living in parts of Mackay, a city 950 kilometers (590 miles) north of the state capital Brisbane, to head south to higher ground.

With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

When Singapore’s first prime minister, Lee Kuan Yew, passed away in 2015, 16-year-old Amos Yee made an obscenity-filled YouTube video denouncing the late leader as a “tyrant.” That and other postings earned him a four-week jail sentence for “wounding religious feelings and obscenity.” Not long after, he earned another six-week sentence for derogatory comments on Islam and Christianity. On Friday, US Immigration Judge Samuel B. Cole granted asylum to Mr. Yee, now 18, who flew to Chicago in December. “His prosecution, detention, and general maltreatment at the hands of the Singapore authorities constitute persecution,” Judge Cole ruled.

5 Easy Ways to Make Fast Cash

5 Easy Ways to Make Fast Cash

For aluminum cans, you'll generally get 40 cents per pound, and maybe 50 cents a pound if you bring in 100 pounds or more. If you have old computer equipment, you could also recycle that for money -- not much, though.

US leads boycott of nuclear weapons ban talks

US leads boycott of nuclear weapons ban talks

More than 100 countries on Monday launched the first UN talks aimed at achieving a legally binding ban on nuclear weapons, as Washington led an international boycott of a process it deems unrealistic. Before the conference had even begun, the US ambassador to the UN, Nikki Haley, spoke out to reject the proposal in the light of current global security threats. "As a mom and a daughter there is nothing I want more for my family than a world with no nuclear weapons," Haley, who represents the world's largest nuclear power, said on the sidelines of the meeting.

The 8 best new features Apple added to your iPhone in iOS 10.3

The 8 best new features Apple added to your iPhone in iOS 10.3

After releasing roughly 437 different iOS 10.3 betas to developers over the past few weeks alone, Apple has finally released iOS 10.3 to the public. The new mobile software is available as an over the air (OTA) download or as a download through iTunes on a Mac or Windows PC, and it's compatible with 19 different Apple devices dating as far back as the iPhone 5, 4th-generation iPad, iPad mini 2, and the 6th-generation iPod touch. Should you be excited? Should you rush to download and install iOS 10.3 on your iPhone or iPad as soon as possible? In this post, we'll run through all of the top new features Apple introduced in iOS 10.3. Find My AirPods: The most talked-about new feature in iOS 10.3 is Find My AirPods, which obviously only matters if you own a pair of Apple's hot new AirPods. They're still next to impossible to find in Apple stores, so Amazon is really your only hope if you want AirPods anytime soon. There's now a new option in the Find My iPhone app that can track down your AirPods, but it's nowhere near as accurate or as useful as it is for iPhones and iPads since AirPods don't have a GPS radio or the ability to connect to any networks. Instead, this is basically a log that will show you the last location where your iPhone was connected to your AirPods. If you forget your AirPods somewhere, this nifty new feature could definitely help you find them. If you haven't connected to them in a while or if they're stolen, you're pretty much out of luck. App Transition Animations: You might not even notice this one, but Apple made a subtle change to the transition animations that are shown as apps open and close in iOS 10.3. They now have slightly more rounded edges, which is definitely not a big deal. But they also seem to move a bit faster, which is a big deal since it speeds up the interface a bit. Weather in Maps: In the Maps app, users can now 3D Touch the weather icon to see a local forecast for the area. Apple ID Profile: There is now a new Apple ID profile section in the Settings app that you'll see at the very top of the first screen. It gives you access to a single page where you'll find your full contact profile, security settings, payment information, iCloud account details, App Store settings, Family Sharing settings and a bit more. Also of note, this page displays every Apple device where you're currently signed in. iCloud Storage: You'll now find a new section at the top of your iCloud settings page with a breakdown of how your iCloud storage is being used. New File System: This is a big one, though it takes place completely behind the scenes so you won't even realize it's happening. Installing iOS 10.3 will automatically update your iPhone or iPad to use Apple File System (APFS) instead of HFS+. APFS is better optimized for NAND flash storage so files can be accessed more quickly, and it also supports stronger encryption. Voice Call Continuity for Verizon: This is obviously a new feature that will only be appreciated by Verizon Wireless subscribers, but iCloud calling features are now finally supported if you use Verizon. That means you can make or receive voice calls on your Mac, iPad, iPod touch, and Apple Watch. Podcasts Widget: You know that widgets panel you never use? There's a new Podcasts widget available now (it's actually a pretty cool addition for podcast fans).

Activist hedge funds press Tangoe to sell itself: sources

Activist hedge funds press Tangoe to sell itself: sources

Two activist hedge funds are pressing directors of Tangoe Inc. to sell the company, according to people familiar with the matter, citing a weakness in the IT company's business and falling stock price. Ancora Advisors and Engine Capital sent a letter to the company's board of directors last week urging the company to resist the temptation to remain independent, and to do everything possible to seek a buyer, sources said. Tangoe's stock is currently trading at $5.04 per share and its market value is around $200 million.

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

A 6,800-ton South Korean ferry was hoisted to the surface last week nearly three years after it capsized and sank in violent seas off the country's southwestern coast, an emotional moment for the nation as it searches for closure to one of its deadliest disasters. More than 300 people — most of whom were students on a high school trip — died when the Sewol sank on April 16, 2014, touching off an outpouring of national grief and soul searching about long-ignored public safety and regulatory failures.

Brazil tainted meat: Three key markets resume imports

Brazil tainted meat: Three key markets resume imports

Brasília (AFP) - Brazil won a major victory Saturday in the fight to restore credibility amid a tainted meat scandal, with key markets China, Egypt and Chile lifting their bans on its products. The three countries, which had totally closed their markets to Brazilian meat at the beginning of the week, said they would open them to all but imports from the 21 Brazilian processing plants under investigation. About 20 countries this week -- including the European Union, Japan and Mexico -- closed fully or partially their doors to Brazilian meat imports, whose sales brought in more than $13 billion to the Brazilian economy in 2016.

Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against Assad

Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against Assad

By Tom Miles GENEVA (Reuters) - The Syrian opposition rejects terrorism and is "fed up" with banned militants but they cannot be stopped if Syria continues evicting populations of besieged areas, opposition negotiator Basma Kodmani said on Sunday. Syria's government has always cited the fight against terrorism to justify its part in a six-year war that has killed hundreds of thousands, and brands all its opponents and their backers as terrorists and sponsors of terror. The opposition's chief negotiator Nasr al-Hariri, who is trying to negotiate an end the rule of President Bashar al-Assad, began this month by saying its stance against terrorism was proven on the battlefield and not mere words.

Washington's cherry blossoms bloom despite cold snap

Washington's cherry blossoms bloom despite cold snap

A mild winter followed by a spate of cold weather in Washington, made its mark on the city’s cherry blossoms, but the annual festival delighted first-time visitors on Sunday. The cherry blossom trees were a gift from Japan to the United States in 1912. The cherry blossom trees currently grow in three National Park Service locations, including the Tidal Basin, Hains Point and on the Washington Monument grounds.

Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

This past Friday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk dashed the hopes and dreams of prospective Model 3 owners with just a few simple tweets. Tempering expectations, Musk emphasized that Tesla's upcoming Model 3 will not be more advanced -- in any capacity -- than the company's flagship Model S. "Model 3 is just a smaller, more affordable version of Model S [with] less range & power & fewer features," Musk said. "Model S has more advanced technology." Musk later added that the Model 3 will not feature the elegant "auto extend handles" Tesla introduced on the Model S. While Muks's comments here might seem obvious, the reality is that some of the hype and speculation surrounding the Model 3 had reached bizarre levels in recent months. Case in point: because the Model 3 prototype Tesla unveiled last year lacked an instrument panel with traditional gauges for items like speed, range and other pertinent information, many Tesla enthusiasts began wondering if Tesla had some special plan for the dashboard, with many believing that a heads up display (HUD) on the windshield was an inevitability. As a quick reminder, here's a photo of the Model 3 interior taken from the company's special event last year. As is evident below, the only location a driver can access information is the 15-inch touchscreen in the center console. In another shot, we can see that Model 3 drivers will have to divert their eyes to the upper left hand corner of the display in order to ascertain their current speed. Alas, Tesla doesn't have any secret plans to implement some advanced HUD on the Model 3. In a tweet addressing the matter, Musk said that as cars become more autonomous, the need for a suite of information at the ready becomes less of an issue. https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/845285846936825856 Still, we're still a long ways off before fully self driving cars become commonplace. In turn, it remains to be seen if the Model 3 design in its current incarnation is perhaps too far ahead of its time. Besides, autonomous driving features for the Model 3 will cost extra, meaning that not every Model 3 on the road will be able to take advantage of the vehicle's self-driving capabilities. One question about the Model 3 that remains unanswered is whether or not can expect any changes to the car's steering wheel design. This past April, Musk boasted that the final design will be akin to a spaceship. https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/716729420078133248 To answer that, we'll probably have to wait until next July when Tesla is planning the next phase of its Model 3 reveal.

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People

The research used detailed brain scans to compare the brains of people who were blind to the brains of people who were not blind. Such brain changes arise because the brain has a "plastic" quality, meaning that it can make new connections among neurons, the study said. "Even in the case of being profoundly blind, the brain rewires itself in a manner to use the information at its disposal so that it can interact with the environment in a more effective manner," senior study author Dr. Lotfi Merabet, the director of the Laboratory for Visual Neuroplasticity at Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, said in a statement.

White House threatens to bypass hardline conservatives on tax reform

White House threatens to bypass hardline conservatives on tax reform

By Lindsay Dunsmuir and Doina Chiacu WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Fresh off a defeat on U.S. healthcare legislation, the White House warned rebellious conservative lawmakers that they should get behind President Donald Trump's agenda or he may bypass them on future legislative fights, including tax reform. The threat by White House chief of staff Reince Priebus to build a broad coalition on tax reform that could include moderate Democrats came as the Republican head of the tax-writing committee in the House of Representatives said he hoped to move a tax bill through his panel this spring. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady said his committee had been working on tax reform in parallel with the failed healthcare reform push.

Family of missing ex-FBI agent files lawsuit against Iran

Family of missing ex-FBI agent files lawsuit against Iran

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The family of a former FBI agent who went missing in Iran a decade ago on an unauthorized CIA assignment has filed a lawsuit against the Islamic Republic, accusing it of using "cold, cynical and false denials" to torture his loved ones.

Cities and monuments switch off for Earth Hour

Cities and monuments switch off for Earth Hour

The Empire State Building and United Nations headquarters in New York joined other iconic buildings and monuments around the world plunging into darkness for sixty minutes on Saturday to mark Earth Hour and draw attention to climate change. The Eiffel Tower, the Kremlin, the Acropolis in Athens and Sydney's Opera House also dimmed their lights as millions of people from some 170 countries and territories were expected to take part in Earth Hour, the annual bid to highlight global warming caused by the burning of coal, oil and gas to drive cars and power plants.

Violence erupts at pro-Trump rally on California beach

Violence erupts at pro-Trump rally on California beach

Supporters of President Trump holding a rally on a popular Southern California beach clashed with counter-protesters on Saturday and four people were arrested, law enforcement said. Multiple fights broke out and at least one Trump supporter was doused with pepper spray when pro-Trump demonstrators marching along Bolsa Chica State Beach encountered a small group opposed to the Republican president who had gathered to denounce the rally. Four counter-protesters were arrested, three for illegal use of pepper spray and one for assault and battery, Kevin Pearsall, a spokesman for the California State Parks Police said on Saturday evening.

'Now or never' for Europe, French think tank warns

'Now or never' for Europe, French think tank warns

By Noah Barkin BERLIN (Reuters) - The leaders of France and Germany must use the window of opportunity that opens up after elections in both countries to inject new momentum into their single currency project or risk its failure, a leading French think tank warned on Monday. In a 77-page report entitled "The Europe We Need", the Institut Montaigne, an independent institute with links to French presidential candidates Emmanuel Macron and Francois Fillon, called for a "multi-speed" Europe in which the euro zone presses ahead with its own budget and even a prime minister. The report, the product of months of consultation between leading figures from European business, politics and banking, could serve as a blueprint for use by a new French president.

The buck stops with Trump

The buck stops with Trump

Donald Trump sat in the Oval Office on Friday evening in an unfamiliar position -- having to own failure. Fittingly perhaps, Trump addressed his failure from behind a desk in the Oval Office. Trump was not ready to take quite that much ownership, although he did profess to be "a little surprised" by the plan's failure.

Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

Anyone who's played a futuristic shooter since the dawn of video games knows that when you see something called a "railgun" you're in for a real treat. Well, the US Navy built a railgun of its very own, and it just showed off its remarkably powerful creation in a new video of its test firing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=106&v=Pi-BDIu_umo Railguns like the one the Navy has built trade chemical propellants like gunpowder for the sheer power of electricity, generating extremely strong magnetic fields to push a projectile down a set of rails and out the end of the barrel. It might not sound particularly efficient, but the speeds that railgun projectiles can achieve put traditional cannons to shame. The Navy's massive weapon, for example, launches its rounds at a whopping 4,500 mph. Additionally, the projectiles launched by the railgun do their damage not by exploding, but simply by striking their target while moving at such a high speed, quite literally tearing apart anything they come into contact with. For most of their history, railguns have been more fiction than science, and their practicality and reliability has repeatedly been questioned over time. The size of the device itself is typically massive, owing to the large and complex electronic components required to supply the necessary power. However, there are also some pretty fantastic benefits of the non-explosive rounds, such as much less chance of unexploded ordnance causing problems either on the ship or vehicle firing the weapon, or on the battlefield after a skirmish has ended.

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago

The medieval man was buried along with hundreds of others in a graveyard underneath what is now the Old Divinity School building of St. John's College at the University of Cambridge, in the United Kingdom. By studying his remains and piecing together his facial features and biological history, archeologists said they hope to understand the lives of anonymous poor people in the 13th century. "Most historical records are about well-off people and especially their financial and legal transactions," study lead researcher John Robb, a professor of archaeology at the University of Cambridge, said in a statement.

Florida man kills one, wounds five in 'horrific' shooting: police

Florida man kills one, wounds five in 'horrific' shooting: police

A man killed his girlfriend and wounded five other people, including two children and a high school student at a bus stop, during a shooting spree in central Florida on Monday, police said. Police say Allen D. Cashe opened fire a few hours after officers had been called to break up a dispute over a vehicle between him and his girlfriend, who was not identified. Cashe, 31, killed the girlfriend and critically wounded her two sons, ages 7 and 8, and her father, Sanford Police spokeswoman Bianca Gillett said.

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Trump decides yes, he can stay mad at Freedom Caucus for health care defeat

Trump decides yes, he can stay mad at Freedom Caucus for health care defeat

President Trump did not blame House Republicans for failing to pass the bill to repeal and replace Obamacare after it was abruptly pulled. “Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!” Trump tweeted early Sunday. Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!

Gold coin worth $4 million stolen from Berlin museum

Gold coin worth $4 million stolen from Berlin museum

A Canadian gold coin named "Big Maple Leaf" which bears the image of Queen Elizabeth II was stolen in the early hours of Monday morning from Berlin's Bode Museum. Given the high purity of the gold used in the coin, its material value is estimated to be $4 million. The museum said on its website that the coin was issued by the Royal Canadian Mint in 2007 and that it was featured in the Guinness Book of Records for its "unmatched" degree of purity.

Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrike

Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrike

WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. counterterrorism airstrike earlier this month in Afghanistan killed an al-Qaida leader responsible for a deadly hotel attack in Islamabad in 2008 and the 2009 attack on a bus carrying the Sri Lankan cricket team, the Pentagon said Saturday.

New York skyscrapers adapt to climate change

New York skyscrapers adapt to climate change

With a skyline crowded with ever-more luxury towers, the construction of another Manhattan skyscraper wouldn't normally be remarkable. Planned just after deadly Hurricane Sandy ravaged New York in October 2012 -- sounding another alarm about the mounting effects of climate change -- it was designed with new threats in mind, reflecting how the real estate world is evolving to account for global warming, in contrast to President Donald Trump's moves to roll back environmental protection. The huge storm killed more than 40 people in New York, paralyzing the US financial capital for days.

Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?

Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?

Infowars owner and long-time conspiracy theorist Alex Jones admitted that his site falsely reported and commented on the debunked “Pizzagate” controversy, a theory that alleged that Comet Ping Pong, a Washington, D.C., pizza restaurant, had played a role in a child-sex-trafficking ring that also involved Hillary Clinton. Apologizing to the restaurant’s owner, James Alefantis, Mr. Jones issued a statement Friday. “I want our viewers and listeners to know that we regret any negative impact our commentaries may have had on Mr. Alefantis, Comet Ping Pong, or its employees,” he said.

Florida man kills one, wounds five in 'horrific' shooting: police

Florida man kills one, wounds five in 'horrific' shooting: police

A man killed his girlfriend and wounded five other people, including two children and a high school student at a bus stop, during a shooting spree in central Florida on Monday, police said. Police say Allen D. Cashe opened fire a few hours after officers had been called to break up a dispute over a vehicle between him and his girlfriend, who was not identified. Cashe, 31, killed the girlfriend and critically wounded her two sons, ages 7 and 8, and her father, Sanford Police spokeswoman Bianca Gillett said.

The 8 best new features Apple added to your iPhone in iOS 10.3

The 8 best new features Apple added to your iPhone in iOS 10.3

After releasing roughly 437 different iOS 10.3 betas to developers over the past few weeks alone, Apple has finally released iOS 10.3 to the public. The new mobile software is available as an over the air (OTA) download or as a download through iTunes on a Mac or Windows PC, and it's compatible with 19 different Apple devices dating as far back as the iPhone 5, 4th-generation iPad, iPad mini 2, and the 6th-generation iPod touch. Should you be excited? Should you rush to download and install iOS 10.3 on your iPhone or iPad as soon as possible? In this post, we'll run through all of the top new features Apple introduced in iOS 10.3. Find My AirPods: The most talked-about new feature in iOS 10.3 is Find My AirPods, which obviously only matters if you own a pair of Apple's hot new AirPods. They're still next to impossible to find in Apple stores, so Amazon is really your only hope if you want AirPods anytime soon. There's now a new option in the Find My iPhone app that can track down your AirPods, but it's nowhere near as accurate or as useful as it is for iPhones and iPads since AirPods don't have a GPS radio or the ability to connect to any networks. Instead, this is basically a log that will show you the last location where your iPhone was connected to your AirPods. If you forget your AirPods somewhere, this nifty new feature could definitely help you find them. If you haven't connected to them in a while or if they're stolen, you're pretty much out of luck. App Transition Animations: You might not even notice this one, but Apple made a subtle change to the transition animations that are shown as apps open and close in iOS 10.3. They now have slightly more rounded edges, which is definitely not a big deal. But they also seem to move a bit faster, which is a big deal since it speeds up the interface a bit. Weather in Maps: In the Maps app, users can now 3D Touch the weather icon to see a local forecast for the area. Apple ID Profile: There is now a new Apple ID profile section in the Settings app that you'll see at the very top of the first screen. It gives you access to a single page where you'll find your full contact profile, security settings, payment information, iCloud account details, App Store settings, Family Sharing settings and a bit more. Also of note, this page displays every Apple device where you're currently signed in. iCloud Storage: You'll now find a new section at the top of your iCloud settings page with a breakdown of how your iCloud storage is being used. New File System: This is a big one, though it takes place completely behind the scenes so you won't even realize it's happening. Installing iOS 10.3 will automatically update your iPhone or iPad to use Apple File System (APFS) instead of HFS+. APFS is better optimized for NAND flash storage so files can be accessed more quickly, and it also supports stronger encryption. Voice Call Continuity for Verizon: This is obviously a new feature that will only be appreciated by Verizon Wireless subscribers, but iCloud calling features are now finally supported if you use Verizon. That means you can make or receive voice calls on your Mac, iPad, iPod touch, and Apple Watch. Podcasts Widget: You know that widgets panel you never use? There's a new Podcasts widget available now (it's actually a pretty cool addition for podcast fans).

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

A 6,800-ton South Korean ferry was hoisted to the surface last week nearly three years after it capsized and sank in violent seas off the country's southwestern coast, an emotional moment for the nation as it searches for closure to one of its deadliest disasters. More than 300 people — most of whom were students on a high school trip — died when the Sewol sank on April 16, 2014, touching off an outpouring of national grief and soul searching about long-ignored public safety and regulatory failures.

Northeast Australia braces for cyclone, thousands flee to higher ground

Northeast Australia braces for cyclone, thousands flee to higher ground

By Tom Westbrook SYDNEY (Reuters) - Thousands of Australians fled their homes on Monday as a powerful cyclone bore down on coastal towns in Queensland, where authorities urged 30,000 people to evacuate low lying areas most at risk from tidal surges and winds of up to 300 km per hour (185 mph). Cyclone Debbie is expected to gather strength before making landfall in the northeast state early on Tuesday, with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology forecasting a category four storm, just one rung below the most dangerous wind speed level. The growing alarm persuaded the state government on Monday to warn some 25,000 people living in parts of Mackay, a city 950 kilometers (590 miles) north of the state capital Brisbane, to head south to higher ground.

Photos of the day - March 26, 2017

Photos of the day - March 26, 2017

A man waves traditional daggers, or jambiyas, as he attends with supporters of the Houthi movement and Yemen’s former president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, a rally to mark the two-year anniversary since the military intervention by a Saudi-led coalition, in Sanaa, Yemen; police officers detain an opposition supporter during a rally in Vladivostok, Russia; Balinese people carry giant effigies in the form of the devil, whose local name is “Ogoh-ogoh,” during a parade before Nyepi Day, the Balinese Day of Silence, marking the Balinese Hindu New Year in Gianyar, a regency in Bali, Indonesia. ...

Ted Koppel to Sean Hannity: You’re bad for America

Ted Koppel to Sean Hannity: You’re bad for America

Ted Koppel says Fox News host Sean Hannity is bad for America. On “CBS Sunday Morning,” the veteran newsman told Hannity that the audience he attracts is unable to distinguish between the divisive political rhetoric that marked the 2016 presidential campaign and the truth. “You have attracted people who are determined that ideology is more important than facts,” Koppel told Hannity.

Brazil tainted meat: Three key markets resume imports

Brazil tainted meat: Three key markets resume imports

Brasília (AFP) - Brazil won a major victory Saturday in the fight to restore credibility amid a tainted meat scandal, with key markets China, Egypt and Chile lifting their bans on its products. The three countries, which had totally closed their markets to Brazilian meat at the beginning of the week, said they would open them to all but imports from the 21 Brazilian processing plants under investigation. About 20 countries this week -- including the European Union, Japan and Mexico -- closed fully or partially their doors to Brazilian meat imports, whose sales brought in more than $13 billion to the Brazilian economy in 2016.

With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

With asylum grant, did the US just reward hate speech?

When Singapore’s first prime minister, Lee Kuan Yew, passed away in 2015, 16-year-old Amos Yee made an obscenity-filled YouTube video denouncing the late leader as a “tyrant.” That and other postings earned him a four-week jail sentence for “wounding religious feelings and obscenity.” Not long after, he earned another six-week sentence for derogatory comments on Islam and Christianity. On Friday, US Immigration Judge Samuel B. Cole granted asylum to Mr. Yee, now 18, who flew to Chicago in December. “His prosecution, detention, and general maltreatment at the hands of the Singapore authorities constitute persecution,” Judge Cole ruled.

Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

When it was released last fall, Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 was the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. Unfortunately though, the Galaxy Note 7 was literally the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. A poor battery design caused dozens of phones to explode while being charged — and in some cases, while unplugged and in use — causing property damage and even injuring some users in the process. As a result, Samsung was forced to issue an unprecedented global recall, asking everyone around the world who purchased the phone to return or exchange it as soon as possible. Most of the potentially destructive smartphones have been collected by now. Since the phone was so impressive, however, a small percentage of holdouts have refused to give up their precious Note 7 handsets. We're not sure why Samsung waited as long as it did, but the company is finally taking its final step in ensuring that the Note 7 cannot do anymore damage. According to South Korean news site Yonhap News, Samsung will take steps next week to completely disable any remaining Galaxy Note 7 smartphones that may still be in use. The company said some time ago that 97% of all Note 7 phones have been reclaimed by the company. With more than 1 million handsets sold before Samsung discontinued the phone, however, that leaves tens of thousands of Note 7 handsets still in users' hands. According to the report, Samsung plans to issue a mandatory software update that will completely prevent any remaining Galaxy Note 7 devices from holding a charge. As a result, the phones will no longer be able to power on unless they are plugged in. Samsung and its carrier partners issued a similar software update in the US late last year and in early 2017, and now any remaining markets where the Note 7 might still be in use will get the update. Diehard Samsung fans who were holding onto their Note 7 phones won't have to wait very long before their soon-to-be crippled Note 7 phones are replaced. Samsung will unveil its new Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ flagship phones on Wednesday, and they'll be released about a month later.

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago

The medieval man was buried along with hundreds of others in a graveyard underneath what is now the Old Divinity School building of St. John's College at the University of Cambridge, in the United Kingdom. By studying his remains and piecing together his facial features and biological history, archeologists said they hope to understand the lives of anonymous poor people in the 13th century. "Most historical records are about well-off people and especially their financial and legal transactions," study lead researcher John Robb, a professor of archaeology at the University of Cambridge, said in a statement.

Iran strikes back at US with 'reciprocal' sanctions

Iran strikes back at US with 'reciprocal' sanctions

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran on Sunday sanctioned what it described as 15 American companies, alleging they support terrorism, repression and Israel's occupation of land Palestinians want for a future state, likely in retaliation for sanctions earlier announced by the U.S.

United Airlines bars teenage girls in leggings from flight

United Airlines bars teenage girls in leggings from flight

"The passengers this morning were United pass riders who were not in compliance with our dress code policy for company benefit travel," the airline said on Twitter as the incident Thanwent viral on social media. In another tweet made in response to a question from a social media user, the airline said: "Casual attire for ticketed passengers is fine. United pass travelers are company employees or family members of employees.

Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains

Powerful winds, large hail take aim at Southern Plains

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Golf ball-sized hail and powerful winds are expected to roll through parts of the Southern Plains late Sunday, marking the latest round of turbulent weather across the Midwest and South, forecasters said.

Seven students, one teacher killed in Japan avalanche

Seven students, one teacher killed in Japan avalanche

An avalanche Monday killed seven Japanese high school students and a teacher on a mountain-climbing outing, and injured 40 more. More than 100 troops were deployed in a major rescue mission after the avalanche hit ski slopes in Tochigi prefecture north of Tokyo. A total of 52 students and 11 teachers from seven high schools were on a three-day mountaineering expedition when disaster struck.

Syrian rebels resume withdrawal from last Homs bastion: monitor

Syrian rebels resume withdrawal from last Homs bastion: monitor

Hundreds of rebels left their last bastion in Syria's Homs city on Monday, resuming an evacuation expected to be among the largest of its kind under a Russian-backed deal with the government, state media and a monitor said. Heavy fighting between rebel groups and the army further north in Hama province over the weekend had delayed their departure from the city's al-Waer district, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. The evacuation began last week with the Syrian government shuttling hundreds of people from the district in Homs, which was an early center of the 2011 uprising that spiraled into war.

Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

This past Friday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk dashed the hopes and dreams of prospective Model 3 owners with just a few simple tweets. Tempering expectations, Musk emphasized that Tesla's upcoming Model 3 will not be more advanced -- in any capacity -- than the company's flagship Model S. "Model 3 is just a smaller, more affordable version of Model S [with] less range & power & fewer features," Musk said. "Model S has more advanced technology." Musk later added that the Model 3 will not feature the elegant "auto extend handles" Tesla introduced on the Model S. While Muks's comments here might seem obvious, the reality is that some of the hype and speculation surrounding the Model 3 had reached bizarre levels in recent months. Case in point: because the Model 3 prototype Tesla unveiled last year lacked an instrument panel with traditional gauges for items like speed, range and other pertinent information, many Tesla enthusiasts began wondering if Tesla had some special plan for the dashboard, with many believing that a heads up display (HUD) on the windshield was an inevitability. As a quick reminder, here's a photo of the Model 3 interior taken from the company's special event last year. As is evident below, the only location a driver can access information is the 15-inch touchscreen in the center console. In another shot, we can see that Model 3 drivers will have to divert their eyes to the upper left hand corner of the display in order to ascertain their current speed. Alas, Tesla doesn't have any secret plans to implement some advanced HUD on the Model 3. In a tweet addressing the matter, Musk said that as cars become more autonomous, the need for a suite of information at the ready becomes less of an issue. https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/845285846936825856 Still, we're still a long ways off before fully self driving cars become commonplace. In turn, it remains to be seen if the Model 3 design in its current incarnation is perhaps too far ahead of its time. Besides, autonomous driving features for the Model 3 will cost extra, meaning that not every Model 3 on the road will be able to take advantage of the vehicle's self-driving capabilities. One question about the Model 3 that remains unanswered is whether or not can expect any changes to the car's steering wheel design. This past April, Musk boasted that the final design will be akin to a spaceship. https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/716729420078133248 To answer that, we'll probably have to wait until next July when Tesla is planning the next phase of its Model 3 reveal.

Washington's cherry blossoms bloom despite cold snap

Washington's cherry blossoms bloom despite cold snap

A mild winter followed by a spate of cold weather in Washington, made its mark on the city’s cherry blossoms, but the annual festival delighted first-time visitors on Sunday. The cherry blossom trees were a gift from Japan to the United States in 1912. The cherry blossom trees currently grow in three National Park Service locations, including the Tidal Basin, Hains Point and on the Washington Monument grounds.

Bulgarian center-right GERB wins most votes in election

Bulgarian center-right GERB wins most votes in election

By Tsvetelia Tsolova and Angel Krasimirov SOFIA (Reuters) - Bulgaria's center-right GERB party narrowly won a parliamentary election on Sunday, giving it a chance to form another government after leader Boiko Borisov resigned as prime minister in November, triggering the snap poll. The GERB party won 33 percent of the vote, the Balkan country's third in just 4 years, with the leftist Socialists trailing on 27.2 percent, partial official results with 26 percent of the ballots counted showed. "The result of the vote shows that GERB is obliged to form a government," said Borisov.

Family of missing ex-FBI agent files lawsuit against Iran

Family of missing ex-FBI agent files lawsuit against Iran

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The family of a former FBI agent who went missing in Iran a decade ago on an unauthorized CIA assignment has filed a lawsuit against the Islamic Republic, accusing it of using "cold, cynical and false denials" to torture his loved ones.

Why is Colorado risking hundreds of millions to protect its marijuana industry?

Why is Colorado risking hundreds of millions to protect its marijuana industry?

Colorado's state legislature is considering an unusual plan to defend the state's marijuana industry from a federal crackdown under the Trump administration. The bill would allow growers and sellers to reclassify their recreational marijuana as medical “based on a business need due to a change in local, state, or federal law or enforcement policy.” The strategy is meant to keep marijuana businesses afloat if the federal government comes after them, even if it means the state losing hundreds of millions of dollars in taxes. The bill represents a shift in how states might respond to what marijuana advocates say are an over-simplification of cannabis policy by the Trump administration.

5 Easy Ways to Make Fast Cash

5 Easy Ways to Make Fast Cash

For aluminum cans, you'll generally get 40 cents per pound, and maybe 50 cents a pound if you bring in 100 pounds or more. If you have old computer equipment, you could also recycle that for money -- not much, though.

Cities and monuments switch off for Earth Hour

Cities and monuments switch off for Earth Hour

The Empire State Building and United Nations headquarters in New York joined other iconic buildings and monuments around the world plunging into darkness for sixty minutes on Saturday to mark Earth Hour and draw attention to climate change. The Eiffel Tower, the Kremlin, the Acropolis in Athens and Sydney's Opera House also dimmed their lights as millions of people from some 170 countries and territories were expected to take part in Earth Hour, the annual bid to highlight global warming caused by the burning of coal, oil and gas to drive cars and power plants.

White House threatens to bypass hardline conservatives on tax reform

White House threatens to bypass hardline conservatives on tax reform

By Lindsay Dunsmuir and Doina Chiacu WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Fresh off a defeat on U.S. healthcare legislation, the White House warned rebellious conservative lawmakers that they should get behind President Donald Trump's agenda or he may bypass them on future legislative fights, including tax reform. The threat by White House chief of staff Reince Priebus to build a broad coalition on tax reform that could include moderate Democrats came as the Republican head of the tax-writing committee in the House of Representatives said he hoped to move a tax bill through his panel this spring. House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady said his committee had been working on tax reform in parallel with the failed healthcare reform push.

Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

Anyone who's played a futuristic shooter since the dawn of video games knows that when you see something called a "railgun" you're in for a real treat. Well, the US Navy built a railgun of its very own, and it just showed off its remarkably powerful creation in a new video of its test firing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=106&v=Pi-BDIu_umo Railguns like the one the Navy has built trade chemical propellants like gunpowder for the sheer power of electricity, generating extremely strong magnetic fields to push a projectile down a set of rails and out the end of the barrel. It might not sound particularly efficient, but the speeds that railgun projectiles can achieve put traditional cannons to shame. The Navy's massive weapon, for example, launches its rounds at a whopping 4,500 mph. Additionally, the projectiles launched by the railgun do their damage not by exploding, but simply by striking their target while moving at such a high speed, quite literally tearing apart anything they come into contact with. For most of their history, railguns have been more fiction than science, and their practicality and reliability has repeatedly been questioned over time. The size of the device itself is typically massive, owing to the large and complex electronic components required to supply the necessary power. However, there are also some pretty fantastic benefits of the non-explosive rounds, such as much less chance of unexploded ordnance causing problems either on the ship or vehicle firing the weapon, or on the battlefield after a skirmish has ended.

One killed in shooting on Las Vegas Strip, suspect surrenders

One killed in shooting on Las Vegas Strip, suspect surrenders

One person was killed Saturday and another wounded in a shooting on a bus on the busy Las Vegas strip, police said, with a suspect later surrendering himself to authorities. Police closed a section of South Las Vegas Boulevard for hours after the shooting as a standoff unfolded with the suspect, who had barricaded himself on the bus. "The suspect in the bus has surrendered to officers, and is in custody," the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department said on its Twitter account.

Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against Assad

Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against Assad

By Tom Miles GENEVA (Reuters) - The Syrian opposition rejects terrorism and is "fed up" with banned militants but they cannot be stopped if Syria continues evicting populations of besieged areas, opposition negotiator Basma Kodmani said on Sunday. Syria's government has always cited the fight against terrorism to justify its part in a six-year war that has killed hundreds of thousands, and brands all its opponents and their backers as terrorists and sponsors of terror. The opposition's chief negotiator Nasr al-Hariri, who is trying to negotiate an end the rule of President Bashar al-Assad, began this month by saying its stance against terrorism was proven on the battlefield and not mere words.

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People

The research used detailed brain scans to compare the brains of people who were blind to the brains of people who were not blind. Such brain changes arise because the brain has a "plastic" quality, meaning that it can make new connections among neurons, the study said. "Even in the case of being profoundly blind, the brain rewires itself in a manner to use the information at its disposal so that it can interact with the environment in a more effective manner," senior study author Dr. Lotfi Merabet, the director of the Laboratory for Visual Neuroplasticity at Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, said in a statement.

Photos of the day - March 25, 2017

Photos of the day - March 25, 2017

A woman dressed as “Europa" performs during a rally in Berlin marking the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome; a woman, pushed to the ground by police, tries to defends herself as the police detain an activist during an opposition rally in Minsk, Belarus; Pope Francis waves to the faithful from the Popemobile in Milan, Italy, as Cardinal Angelo Scola, the archbishop of Milan, looks on, after the Angelus in Duomo Square. These are some of the photos of the day. (AP/EPA/Getty/Reuters)