Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

President Trump lost his first fight over health care and Monday night he appeared to back off threats to force Democrats and Republicans to pay for the border wall. Fmr. GOP Congressman David Jolly and MNSBC's Joy Reid join Lawrence O'Donnell.

Voices from overseas: People from around the world consider Trump's first 100 days

Voices from overseas: People from around the world consider Trump's first 100 days

It was the most stunning political victory of the 21st century, one that brought shocked concern in many parts of the world and cheers in others. One uncontroversial certainty was that it would cause reverberations around the globe. Donald Trump campaigned on an “America First” platform, but has found himself as president drawn into thorny geopolitical complexities aplenty in the first 100 days of his administration.

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Two conservative groups filed a lawsuit against the University of California at Berkeley claiming that a decision to cancel an appearance by the firebrand pundit Ann Coulter violated their right to free speech. The Berkeley College Republicans and Young America's Foundation, which had invited Coulter to speak on April 27, accused the university of seeking to silence conservative viewpoints and stifle political discourse at the famously progressive campus by imposing unreasonable demands on campus events involving certain "high-profile" speakers. "Defendants' discriminatory imposition of curfew and venue restrictions has resulted in the cancellation of two speaking engagements featuring prominent conservative speakers in the month of April, 2017," read the lawsuit filed in federal court in San Francisco.

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

The United States on Tuesday expressed "deep concern" over Turkish air strikes against Kurdish fighters in Syria and Iraq and said they were not authorized by the U.S.-led coalition fighting Islamic State. The raids in Iraq's Sinjar region and northeast Syria killed at least 20 in a campaign against groups linked to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), which has waged a three-decade insurgency against Turkey for Kurdish autonomy. Turkey is part of the U.S.-led military coalition fighting militants in Syria.

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Gov. Asa Hutchinson issued an order in February to execute eight men in 10 days in April because the state's stock of midazolam, a key lethal injection drug, expires at the end of the month.

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

The US State Department has been caught promoting Donald Trump’s Florida golf club Mar-a-Lago, in another apparent ethics violation by the administration. The US Embassy in London's website, which the department is responsible for, featured an article titled “Mar a Lago: Winter White House”. It said Mr Trump “is not the first president to have access to Mar-a-Lago as a Florida retreat, but he is the first one to use it”.

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Several mummies and more than 1,000 figurines have been discovered at an ancient cemetery located at Luxor in Egypt, archaeologists reported. A team of archaeologists with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities uncovered the funerary complex during the ministry's ongoing excavations at the site. The funerary complex contains multiple tombs that were originally built for a man named Userhat, who was a judge in Luxor sometime during what modern-day archaeologists call Egypt's New Kingdom (1550–1070 B.C.) period, the ministry said in a statement.

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

Retail banking giant Wells Fargo has fixed problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan and will now be allowed to open new international branches, US banking regulators said Monday. A Treasury Department agency found this month found the bank's board as early as 2005 had received "regular" reports that employee firings and internal ethics complaints were related to unethical sales practices. Monday's announcement reversed an action taken by the Federal Reserve Board and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, which in December jointly found that Wells Fargo had failed to remedy problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan.

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

By David Mardiste AMARI AIR BASE, Estonia (Reuters) - Two of the U.S. Air Force's newest and most advanced jets landed in the Baltic state of Estonia for the first time on Tuesday, a symbolic gesture meant to reinforce the United States' commitment to the defense of NATO allies that border Russia. The visit of the F-35 stealth fighters, which flew from Britain and spent several hours in Estonia, is part of broader U.S. jet pilot training across Europe as the NATO alliance seeks to deter Moscow from any possible incursion in the Baltics. "This is a very clear message," Estonia's Defense Minister Margus Tsahkna told Reuters.

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

After months of college application tasks and an anxious waiting period, high school seniors are starting to receive college acceptance letters. Many students may be relieved, but the hard work isn't necessarily over. Two current undergraduates recently shared their college decision strategies to help you prepare to pick a college before National College Decision Day on May 1.

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

The stated objective of the Hezbollah-coordinated press tour of southern Lebanon was to see new Israeli defensive installations on the border – indications, according to the powerful Shiite Lebanese militia, of Israeli fears of Hezbollah’s growing military might. The unprecedented spectacle appeared to be a deliberate and calculated breach of a UN Security Council resolution that bans non-state forces from bearing arms in southern Lebanon, and it illustrated the unmatched sway Hezbollah wields, and the impunity it enjoys throughout the country. Recommended: Hezbollah 101: Who is the militant group, and what does it want?

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish warplanes struck suspected Kurdish rebel positions in Iraq and Syria on Tuesday, drawing condemnation from Baghdad and criticism from the U.S.-led coalition fighting the Islamic State group, which is allied with Kurdish factions in both countries.

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

A new survey commissioned by Comcast has ranked apartment-dweller's need for good internet, relative to other niceties like basic hygiene. The conclusion seems to be that good Wi-Fi and high-speed internet are viewed as being the most critical. Comcast probably commissioned this survey to show how relevant its brand is to millennials or something, but the only actual truth to be found is this: Comcast knows that you will put up with basically anything to get good internet, so it's going to squeeze you for every last penny. The survey polled 2015 building managers and developers in the US about what features are the most important for prospective renters. A majority (59%) had either Wi-Fi access or fast internet as the most important feature, comfortably beating out a washer-dryer in unit as the must-have. This isn't so much a statement on the value of technology as it is a stunning indictment of broadband technology in the US. In a supposedly technology-literate, competitive, first-world country, access to the internet should be a given. But thanks to the oligopoly of cable companies that control access to the internet with very little regional competition, you're often left with little or no choice of cable providers. That means that if Verizon or Comcast only choose to supply your building with a 10Mbps, you're out of luck. So really, this survey just confirms to Comcast an important fact about its customers: it doesn't matter how bad the customer service is or if it flat-out calls its customers idiots: you don't have any choice and you need internet, so pucker up, lucky consumers.

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

French presidential frontrunner Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday rejected accusations he was resting on his laurels after winning the first round of the election, insisting "nothing's won yet" in the race against the far right's Marine Le Pen. The 39-year-old centrist said his victory in Sunday's first round of voting was proof that pollsters -- who had long placed him second to Le Pen in the opening round -- "get it wrong". "Nothing's won yet," Macron said during a visit to a hospital near Paris.

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

By Dan Levine SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A U.S. judge on Tuesday blocked President Donald Trump's executive order that sought to withhold federal funds from so-called sanctuary cities, dealing another legal blow to the administration's efforts to toughen immigration enforcement. The ruling from U.S. District Judge William Orrick III in San Francisco said Trump's Jan. 25 order targeted broad categories of federal funding for sanctuary governments and that plaintiffs challenging the order were likely to succeed in proving it unconstitutional.

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

MIAMI (AP) — A former Haitian coup leader and recently elected senator in that country pleaded guilty Monday to a U.S. drug money-laundering charge under a deal that should allow him to avoid a potential sentence of life in prison for cocaine trafficking.

Nature throws humanity a softball, provides bugs that digest plastic

Nature throws humanity a softball, provides bugs that digest plastic

Mother Earth is one seriously gracious host. Humanity has done little else to the planet that produced us than completely destroy it at every turn. We dump toxic oil into oceans, irreversibly alter the climate, drive species into extinction, and pile heaps of trash everywhere we can find space for it. Nature owes us nothing, but it still finds a way to help us save our own hides on a regular basis. The latest example? How about a caterpillar that eats and breaks down the one thing humans have created that pollutes for centuries before decomposing on its own: plastic. Plastic is everywhere, and as far as the Earth is concerned it absolutely sucks. Scientists believe it can take anywhere from 400 to 1,000 years for common disposable plastic products like bags, bottles, and containers to break down after being thrown into a landfill — or flying out of your car window and into a ditch. That's a long, long time, and it makes plastic a particularly bad pollutant. Now, researchers believe they've stumbled upon a natural plastic decomposition tool that has been crawling around right under our feet, in the form of Galleria mellonella, the greater wax moth. Scientists from Cambridge University just discovered that the moth's larva can actually eat and break down plastic in a similar way to beeswax, which the moth regularly consumes. Its digestive system breaks up the chemical bonds of polyethylene and makes the insects a powerful tool against the seemingly unending flood of plastic waste around the globe. Unfortunately, solving the problems of plastic pollution isn't as simple as dumping a bunch of moth larva into landfills; scientists first have to fully study and detail the unique process in the bug's gut that is giving it its remarkable power. Once researchers know exactly how the moth is performing its trick they could apply that knowledge to large-scale efforts to biodegrade junk plastic in places where it causes the most problems, such as the ocean and other pollution hot spots.

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

The US Supreme Court on Monday turned back an appeal by rights groups seeking to make public a damning report on the CIA's post-September 11 torture program, ensuring it will remain secret. The court rebuffed arguments from the American Civil Liberties Union that the highly classified report, compiled in 2014 by the Senate Intelligence Committee, should be released based on US government transparency rules. "We are disappointed by this major setback for government transparency and accountability.

Erdogan says Turkey won't wait at Europe's door forever

Erdogan says Turkey won't wait at Europe's door forever

By Samia Nakhoul, Nick Tattersall and Orhan Coskun ANKARA (Reuters) - Turkey will not wait at Europe's door forever and is ready to walk away from EU accession talks if rising Islamophobia and hostility from some member states persist, President Tayyip Erdogan told Reuters in a wide-ranging interview on Tuesday. Speaking at the presidential palace less than two weeks after winning sweeping new powers in a referendum, a relaxed Erdogan said a decision by a leading European human rights body to put Turkey back on a watch list was "entirely political" and that Ankara did not recognize the move. The Strasbourg-based Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe said it put Turkey back on review over its crackdown on dissent since last year's coup attempt, rights violations, and concerns about Erdogan's increased grip on power.

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

Less than two years after officially launching its Pony Car beyond its domestic US borders, the Ford Mustang is the world's best-selling sportscar. In all, Ford sold 150,000 Mustangs around the world in 2016 which, according to the latest industry data from IHS Markit, means the car is not only America's most popular sportscar, it has now conquered the world, too, despite some hard-hitting European and Japanese competition. The Mustang has outsold the Mazda MX-5 Miata, BMW 4 Series, Nissan 370Z and the venerable Porsche 911 among others to claim the top spot, leaving many to ponder why it took Ford so long -- 51 years -- to finally offer its most famous muscle car to European and Asian customers.

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

SAO PAULO (AP) — Twelve men suspected of taking part in a dramatic, multimillion-dollar theft from an armored car company in a Paraguayan border city have been arrested in Brazil, officials in the Brazilian Federal Police said Tuesday.

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

Reports of American workers being short on their retirement funds are rampant. The National Institute on Retirement Security frames the "underfunded" issue in real dollar terms, noting that retirement savings are "dangerously low", and the U.S. retirement savings deficit is between $6.8 and $14 trillion. Yes, too many Americans are underfunded in the retirement accounts -- but how do you know exactly how much you're underfunded?

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

Global warming has pushed the Arctic into a new state unprecedented in human history, with thinning and retreating sea ice, skyrocketing air and sea temperatures, melting permafrost, and glaciers that are shedding ice at increasing rates.  All of these impacts and more may seem remote at first — after all, few of us live in Nunavut — but if you're a coastal resident anywhere in the world, from New York City to Dhaka, Bangladesh, what happens in the Arctic will affect you during the next several decades and beyond, primarily through sea level rise.  SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming The economic effects of all Arctic warming impacts may be enough to dent the gross domestic product of some countries, with cost estimates ranging from $7 trillion to $90 trillion by the end of this century. These are the conclusions of a new, comprehensive assessment of the Arctic climate by a division of the Arctic Council — a cooperative, governing body that helps oversee development in the Far North.  Sea ice (TOP) meets land as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft above Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesThe scientific report, released on Tuesday, is known as Snow, Water, Ice, and Permafrost in the Arctic, or SWIPA. About 90 scientists helped produce the report, while more than two-dozen experts peer-reviewed the results.  The document contains two key findings that anyone concerned about the future of not just the Arctic, but the entire globe, should take note of.  The first is that the Arctic Ocean could be free of summer sea ice starting as early as the late 2030s, which is earlier than other estimates have shown. The second is that rapid Arctic warming is driving greater melting of land ice in the region, which led scientists to conclude that consensus projections of global sea level rise made in 2013 are too conservative. Compared to the previous SWIPA report, which was produced in 2011, the new assessment paints a far more dire picture of an Arctic climate in overdrive.  It also offers hope that action can be taken now to slow down and eventually stabilize Arctic warming after about the year 2050. But time is running out. Even with rapid action to curb global warming pollutants like carbon dioxide and methane, the Arctic most of us grew up with — featuring thick sea ice making the region virtually impenetrable year-round — is gone, and is not likely to return anytime in the next century.  Sea ice thickness trends, showing the thinning trend in recent years.Image: zack labe"... The Arctic of today is different in many respects from the Arctic of the past century, or even the Arctic of 20 years ago," the report states. "Many of the changes underway are due to a simple fact: Ice, snow, and frozen ground — the components of the Arctic cryosphere — are sensitive to heat."  Based on computer model projections, the report states that average fall and winter temperatures in the Arctic will increase up to 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, above late 20th century values by the middle of the century, even if relatively stringent greenhouse gas emissions cuts are made.  Such temperature thresholds are already being reached in some months, with January 2016 recording a temperature anomaly of 9 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981-2010 average for the region, with even higher anomalies seen during October through February of the same year.  This past winter was the warmest on record for the Arctic, and for the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter. This has left sea ice in a precariously thin and sparse state as the upcoming melt season nears.  The report contains valuable findings on what would happen to Arctic climate change if the world were to come close to meeting the goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement. That treaty, which went into force in November 2016, aims to keep global warming to well under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through the year 2100.  It's unclear whether the agreement's goals are still feasible, considering that the U.S. — the world's second-largest emitter — is considering pulling out of it altogether, and other nations have yet to offer plans to cut their emissions in line with the temperature target.  A "drunken forest" in Fairbanks Alaska where trees are collapsing into the ground due to permafrost melt.Image: Warming Images/REX/ShutterstockMeeting the Paris targets would help slow the pace and reduce the severity of Arctic warming, but it "would not stabilize the loss of Arctic glaciers, ice sheets, and ice caps," the report states.  "The recent SWIPA assessment tells that the changes in the Arctic are bound to continue at the current rate until mid-century," said Morten Skovgaard Olsen, who chaired the new report, in an email.  "But it also tells that immediate and ambitious green-house gas reductions will slow the speed of changes beyond mid-century and even stabilize change beyond mid century, preventing major further impacts associated with the Arctic melt .” Any carbon pollution cuts made now will have the most significant influence on what the Arctic will look like after about 2050, the report's authors said at a press conference Tuesday in Virginia.  “The changes are cumulative, and so what we do in the next 5 years is really important on slowing down the changes that will happen in the next 30 or 40 years," said James Overland, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  "The emphasis on action and immediacy is one of the main findings” from the report, he said.  NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice near Pituffik, Greenland.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesForeign ministers from the eight Arctic nations will meet in Fairbanks, Alaska on May 11 to discuss these findings and other issues pertaining to the region. Some discussion on the Paris agreement may take place, particularly along the sidelines of the talks. According to the SWIPA report, meltwater from Arctic glaciers has contributed 35 percent of current sea level rise, with the greatest contribution coming from Greenland.  The planet's largest island lost an average of 375 gigatons of ice per year. This is equivalent to losing a block of ice measuring 4.6 miles on all sides, from 2011 to 2014 alone. It amounts to twice the melt rate from 2003 to 2008. In addition, thawing permafrost is harming infrastructure from Alaska to Siberia, with landslides and mysterious craters swallowing parts of the Russian Arctic.  In Alaska, the report found that wildfires in taiga forests are worse now than at any time in the past 10,000 years, due to hotter, drier summers and earlier spring snowmelt. WATCH: Stunning drone footage captures rare video of blue whales feeding

Pentagon chief warns of 'tough year' for Afghanistan

Pentagon chief warns of 'tough year' for Afghanistan

US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis warned of "another tough year" in Afghanistan as he arrived on an unannounced visit Monday, hours after his Afghan counterpart resigned over a deadly Taliban attack that triggered anger and left the embattled army in disarray. Paying his first visit to Afghanistan as Pentagon chief, Mattis met with President Ashraf Ghani and other officials and US military commanders. "We're under no illusions about the challenges associated with this mission," he said at a press conference in Kabul with General John Nicholson, US commander of NATO forces in Afghanistan.

US Navy fires warning flare at Iran vessel in Persian Gulf

US Navy fires warning flare at Iran vessel in Persian Gulf

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — A U.S. Navy guided-missile destroyer fired a warning flare toward an Iranian Revolutionary Guard vessel coming near it in the Persian Gulf, an American official said on Wednesday, the latest tense naval encounter between the two countries.

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

By Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United States slammed South Sudan's President Salva Kiir on Tuesday for the African state's "man-made" famine and ongoing conflict, urging him to fulfill a month-old pledge of a unilateral truce by ordering his troops back to their barracks. "We must see a sign that progress is possible," U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley told a United Nations Security Council briefing on South Sudan. "We must see that ceasefire implemented." South Sudan descended into civil war in 2013 after Kiir fired his deputy, unleashing a conflict that has spawned armed factions often following ethnic lines.

20 Ways To Save Money

20 Ways To Save Money

Some are tougher to achieve than others, and you'll need to weigh the necessary sacrifice against the return.

elections

Tens of thousands protest Trump’s election victory

Tens of thousands protest Trump’s election victory

Anti-Trump protests continued for a seventh straight day in large cities throughout the country. In Washington, D.C., more than 1,000 students staged a walkout and protested outside of Trump International Hotel, holding signs that read "Boycott Bigotry" and "Stronger Together."

Trump defeats Clinton in 2016 election

Trump defeats Clinton in 2016 election

Donald Trump was elected America’s 45th president Tuesday, an astonishing victory for a celebrity businessman and political novice who capitalized on voters’ economic anxieties, took advantage of racial tensions and overcame a string of sexual assault allegations on his way to the White House. His triumph over Hillary Clinton will end eight years of Democratic dominance of the White House and threatens to undo major achievements of President Barack Obama.

Clinton’s primetime soap opera reaches its finale

Clinton’s primetime soap opera reaches its finale

We’ve finally arrived at sweeps week in the televised event posing as our presidential election. And if American viewers can’t quite bring themselves to click away from Donald Trump’s vulgar and monotonous reality show, it’s probably because they’ve had all they can take of the cloying, predictable soap opera that keeps rerunning on the other channel.

16 in 2016: The places

16 in 2016: The places

By Nov. 9, the votes will have been cast and counted, there will be a winner and a loser, and the country will begin a slow return to normal. Historians will have their say on the outcome, but all of us who have lived through this election will carry away indelible memories of a shocking year in American history: of a handful of ordinary people, swept up in the rush of history; of a series of moments on which the fate of the nation seemed, at least briefly, to turn; and of places on the map that became symbols of a divided nation. ...

Down Ticket #12: GOP Sen. Toomey hopes to save his seat by bucking his party on guns

Down Ticket #12: GOP Sen. Toomey hopes to save his seat by bucking his party on guns

Down Ticket is Yahoo News’ complete guide to the most fascinating House, Senate and governors’ races of 2016. PHILADELPHIA — With control of the Senate at stake in this year’s election, it’s not surprising to see Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a Democratic star, stumping for Katie McGinty, the challenger to Republican Sen. Pat Toomey, a tea party favorite for most of his career. It is noteworthy, however, that some gun control groups are backing Toomey.

New clues link election hacks in U.S. to Russian intelligence

New clues link election hacks in U.S. to Russian intelligence

The Kremlin and Russian President Vladimir Putin: Did the Russians hack U.S. election databases? A top cybersecurity firm said Friday it has found “significant” links between the hacks of two U.S. state election databases this summer and suspected Russian state-sponsored attacks against the ruling political party in Turkey and members of the Ukrainian Parliament. ThreatConnect, a firm founded by former U.S. military intelligence analysts, said it discovered the connection this week by researching a Web address linked to one of the election hacks and cited in an Aug. 18 confidential “flash” alert to state election officials. The alert was first reported Monday by Yahoo News.

FBI says foreign hackers penetrated state election systems

FBI says foreign hackers penetrated state election systems

The FBI has uncovered evidence that foreign hackers penetrated two state election databases in recent weeks, prompting the bureau to warn election officials across the country to take new steps to enhance the security of their computer systems, according to federal and state law enforcement officials. The FBI warning, contained in a “flash” alert from the FBI’s Cyber Division, a copy of which was obtained by Yahoo News, comes amid heightened concerns among U.S. intelligence officials about the possibility of cyberintrusions, potentially by Russian state-sponsored hackers, aimed at disrupting the November elections. Johnson emphasized in the call that Homeland Security was not aware of “specific or credible cybersecurity threats” to the election, officials said.

Manufacturing political masks for the U.S. election

Manufacturing political masks for the U.S. election

One Chinese factory is expecting Donald Trump to beat his likely U.S. presidential rival Hilary Clinton in the popularity stakes. At the Jinhua Partytime Latex Art and Crafts Factory, a Halloween and party supply business that produces thousands of rubber and plastic masks of everyone from Osama Bin Laden to Spiderman, masks of Donald Trump and Democratic front runner Hillary Clinton faces are being churned out. Sales of the two expected presidential candidates are at about half a million each but the factory management believes  Trump will eventually run out the winner.

Violent clashes in Kenya over election body protests

Violent clashes in Kenya over election body protests

Kenyan police fired tear gas and water cannon on Monday at stone-throwing crowds protesting in central Nairobi against an election oversight body they say is biased and should be scrapped, Reuters witnesses reported. Officers armed with batons confronted hundreds of protesters outside the offices of the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC), the third clash over the issue in less than a month. The opposition CORD coalition, led by Raila Odinga who lost the 2013 vote and unsuccessfully challenged the result in court, has accused the IEBC of bias and said its members should quit.

Ben Carson Sometimes Deviates From GOP Health Care Thought

Ben Carson Sometimes Deviates From GOP Health Care Thought

Meanwhile, the federal government could offer catastrophic care coverage akin to the National Flood Insurance Program, paid for with taxes on insurers’ profits. He has called for government regulators to determine — “with the help of medical professionals” — what providers can charge for care, ensuring “fair and consistent” payments “throughout the country.” Once he declared his candidacy, Carson said he’d scrap Medicare and Medicaid — two longtime targets of conservatives — and spend the money instead on giving every American $2,000 a year for a health savings account. Now, three months from when Iowa and New Hampshire voters cast ballots, Carson’s campaign is promising a policy announcement that will clarify just where the candidate stands on health care.

Neurotic? Extroverted? Disagreeable? Political campaigns have an ad for you.

Neurotic? Extroverted? Disagreeable? Political campaigns have an ad for you.

“I’ll put it in your personality file,” Nix joked. “We’ve modeled every personality of every voter in the United States.” If one were to try to imagine the person who claims to know every single American personality, one would probably not think of Nix, an Eton-educated Englishman in a tweed coat who speaks in fluid, grammatically correct paragraphs of his company’s microtargeting strategy. Whether we like it or not, political campaigns know more and more about each and every one of us, and they’re using that data to craft increasingly specific advertising tailored to our lifestyles. Republicans, led by Karl Rove, pioneered the technique of political microtargeting in a presidential election in 2004, to get out the vote for George W. Bush.

us

Trump tax plan slashing business rates to test support in Congress

Trump tax plan slashing business rates to test support in Congress

U.S. President Donald Trump will release a tax plan on Wednesday proposing some deep rate cuts, mostly for businesses, including a slashed corporate income tax rate and steeply discounted tax rate for overseas corporate profits brought into the United States, officials said. Trump intends for his broad blueprint, which will fall short of the kind of comprehensive tax reform that Republicans have long discussed, to be a guidepost for lawmakers in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate. "We're driving this a little bit more," a senior White House official told a group of reporters late on Tuesday.

Giant rabbit dies on United Airlines flight to United States

Giant rabbit dies on United Airlines flight to United States

A 3-foot giant rabbit has died on a United Airlines flight from London, prompting a review at the Chicago-based airline which faced a global backlash this month over its treatment of a passenger who was dragged from his seat. The 10-month old rabbit named Simon, who was tipped to become one of the world's largest rabbits, was traveling to O'Hare in Chicago from Britain after a celebrity owner purchased him. "Simon had a vet’s check-up three hours before the flight and was fit as a fiddle," breeder Annette Edwards told The Sun newspaper.

Exclusive: A New York hotel deal shows how some public pension funds help to enrich Trump

Exclusive: A New York hotel deal shows how some public pension funds help to enrich Trump

Public pension funds in at least seven U.S. states have invested millions of dollars in an investment fund that owns a New York hotel and pays one of President Donald Trump's companies to run it, according to a Reuters review of public records. The Trump SoHo Hotel and Condominium in Manhattan is an upscale 46-story property owned by a Los Angeles investment group, the CIM Group, through one of its real estate funds.

Air travel to U.S. drops in first quarter, Canada, Mexico gain: ForwardKeys

Air travel to U.S. drops in first quarter, Canada, Mexico gain: ForwardKeys

Air passenger arrivals in the United States fell in the first quarter of the year, while arrivals in Canada and Mexico rose, according to data from travel analysis company ForwardKeys. Travelers from the Middle East and Europe were possibly deterred by uncertainty over President Donald Trump's travel ban on citizens of six Muslim-majority nations, as well as the strong dollar, it said on Wednesday. Long-haul arrivals in the U.S. dropped by 4.3 percent in the first quarter, ForwardKeys, which analyses 16 million flight booking transactions a day from major global reservation systems, said.

ACLU sues Los Angeles police over public records requests

ACLU sues Los Angeles police over public records requests

The complaint claims the police department in the second largest city in the United States fails to comply with the California Public Records Act by not responding to requests for records within the time allotted by law and, in some cases, ignores requests altogether, the Los Angeles Times reported. "Access to information about the conduct of government agencies is a fundamental and necessary right of every person in this state," said Adrienna Wong, attorney with the ACLU SoCal, in a statement.

Lawyer for ex-NFL star Hernandez denies letter mentioned prison lover

Lawyer for ex-NFL star Hernandez denies letter mentioned prison lover

By Scott Malone BOSTON (Reuters) - A lawyer for former National Football League star Aaron Hernandez on Tuesday denied media reports that the athlete wrote a letter to a prison lover before hanging himself in his prison cell last week. The former New England Patriots player's body was found on Wednesday hanging in a cell where he was serving a life prison sentence. Law enforcement officials last week confirmed that Hernandez left behind three handwritten letters.

Trump administration to review dozens of U.S. national monuments

Trump administration to review dozens of U.S. national monuments

By Valerie Volcovici WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday will order a review of national monuments created over the past 20 years with an aim toward rescinding or resizing some of them - part of a broader push to reopen areas to drilling, mining and other development. The move comes as Trump seeks to reverse a slew of environmental protections ushered in by former President Barack Obama that he said were hobbling economic growth - an agenda that is cheering industry but enraging conservationists. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke told reporters on Tuesday Trump's executive order would require him to conduct the review of around 30 national monuments and recommend which designations should be lifted or resized over the coming months.

Palantir settles U.S. lawsuit charging bias against Asians

Palantir settles U.S. lawsuit charging bias against Asians

The data analytics and security company Palantir Technologies Inc has agreed to pay nearly $1.7 million to resolve charges it discriminated against Asian applicants for engineering jobs at its Palo Alto, California, office, the U.S. Labor Department said on Tuesday. Palantir, a privately owned data firm best known for helping the U.S. government track down al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, entered into a consent decree under which it will pay $1.7 million back wages and other funds, including the value of stock options, to several people, the department said. Palantir has disputed the Labor Department's allegations but said in a statement it agreed to settle the case in order to get on with its business.

Massive Los Angeles crash kills one, snarls freeways

Massive Los Angeles crash kills one, snarls freeways

Two big rigs and several cars collided on a freeway north of downtown Los Angeles on Tuesday, sparking an explosion and fire, killing at least one person and forcing authorities to shut down two major arteries into the city for hours. Several other people were injured in the fiery crash, which sent plumes of thick black smoke billowing into the sky, said Officer Kevin Tao of the California Highway Patrol. The Los Angeles Times reported that nine people were hurt.

Former President H.W. Bush still hospitalized, has bronchitis

Former President H.W. Bush still hospitalized, has bronchitis

Bush, 92, was admitted to Houston Methodist Hospital on April 14 for a cough that was later diagnosed as a mild case of pneumonia. "While President Bush has recovered from pneumonia, he continues to deal with the effects of chronic bronchitis, which is a condition more prevalent with age," the hospital said in a written statement. The hospital said staff there would continue to monitor Bush and expected to discharge him by the end of the week.

Cleveland officer in Tamir Rice shooting 'did not know was kid': video

Cleveland officer in Tamir Rice shooting 'did not know was kid': video

The partner of a Cleveland police officer who fatally shot 12-year-old Tamir Rice in 2014 said he "didn't know it was a kid" when he responded to an emergency call about an armed man at a park, according to video released on Tuesday. Cleveland Police Department officer Frank Garmback, in a video of a police interview following the shooting of the African-American child, became emotional several times. “I didn’t know it was a kid,” Garmback said as he covered his face with his hands in the video released by the Rice family's attorney Subodh Chandra.

Citing flaws, Oklahoma group calls for extended execution moratorium

Citing flaws, Oklahoma group calls for extended execution moratorium

Oklahoma should extend its moratorium on executions indefinitely until "systemic flaws" in the state's capital punishment system are repaired, a bipartisan group said on Tuesday after a year-long review prompted by problems with prior lethal injections. The state put executions on hold in October 2015. The 11-member Oklahoma Death Penalty Review Commission, led by former Oklahoma Governor Brad Henry, a Democrat, and made up of both death penalty supporters and opponents, said more time was needed to fix issues including the state's drug protocol.

Prosecutors open probe of Wisconsin inmate's dehydration death: media

Prosecutors open probe of Wisconsin inmate's dehydration death: media

The Milwaukee County District Attorney's Office opened an inquest Monday in Milwaukee County Circuit Court into the death of Terrill Thomas, 38, who was found unresponsive in the Milwaukee County Jail on April 24, 2016, after seven days without water, the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reported. In September 2016 a county medical examiner ruled the death a homicide.

Illinois House ignores veto threat by passing abortion expansion

Illinois House ignores veto threat by passing abortion expansion

The Democratic-led Illinois House defied a veto threat by the state’s Republican governor by passing legislation on Tuesday to expand state-funded coverage of abortions for low-income residents and for state employees. The measure, which passed the House 62-55 and now moves to the state Senate, also aims to keep abortions legal in Illinois if the U.S. Supreme Court follows President Donald Trump’s call to overturn its landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that permitted abortions 44 years ago. The vote represented a rare legislative victory for abortion-rights advocates at a time when the battle to restrict abortion in the United States has heated up with the election of Trump as president with a conservative Congress.

U.S. appeals court to reconsider Ohio execution protocol

U.S. appeals court to reconsider Ohio execution protocol

The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati granted Ohio's request to take a second look at whether a preliminary injunction from a lower court judge against the three-drug protocol should stand. The injunction was issued after the inmates showed it was likely that Ohio's use of midazolam, the first of the three drugs, to render them unconscious entailed a "substantial risk" of serious pain that violated their constitutional rights against cruel and unusual punishment.

Palestinian-born activist agrees to deportation from U.S.

Palestinian-born activist agrees to deportation from U.S.

A Palestinian-born activist who spent 10 years in an Israeli prison on a terrorism conviction before moving to the United States and gaining citizenship pleaded guilty on Tuesday to immigration fraud, agreeing to be deported rather than sent to prison. Rasmieh Yousef Odeh, 69, is scheduled to be sentenced on Aug. 17 and subsequently stripped of her U.S. citizenship and expelled from the country. Odeh, who once served as the associate director for the Arab American Action Network in Chicago and was involved last month in organizing rallies opposing President Donald Trump's policies, said she did not know yet where she would go.

Former Expedia IT employee get 15 months in U.S. prison for insider trading

Former Expedia IT employee get 15 months in U.S. prison for insider trading

Jonathan Ly, 28, was sentenced by U.S. District Judge John Coughenour in Seattle after pleading guilty in December to a securities fraud charge for having engaged in an insider trading scheme that prosecutors said netted him $331,000. As part of a plea deal, Ly had also agreed to repay Expedia the $81,592 it spent investigating the computer intrusion.

Former Trump adviser Flynn likely broke law with Russia trip: lawmakers

Former Trump adviser Flynn likely broke law with Russia trip: lawmakers

Former White House national security adviser Michael Flynn likely broke the law by failing to get permission to be paid for a trip to Russia in 2015, the leaders of a House of Representatives committee said on Tuesday. During the visit, Flynn, a retired lieutenant general who advised Donald Trump's presidential campaign, dined with Russian President Vladimir Putin. "General Flynn had a duty and an obligation to seek and obtain permission to receive money from foreign governments," Jason Chaffetz, the Republican chairman of the House Oversight Committee, told reporters.

U.S. Supreme Court may limit where companies can be sued

U.S. Supreme Court may limit where companies can be sued

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday appeared poised to clamp down on where corporations can be sued, a potential setback for plaintiffs' lawyers who strive to bring cases in courts and locales they consider friendly. The nine justices in two separate cases heard appeals of lower court rulings allowing out-of-state injury lawsuits against drug maker Bristol-Myers Squibb Co and BNSF Railway Co. Companies and plaintiffs are engaged in a fight over where lawsuits seeking financial compensation for injuries should be filed.

Ex-prosecutor, retired cops charged in New York corruption probe

Ex-prosecutor, retired cops charged in New York corruption probe

Federal prosecutors say that Paul Dean, 44, and Robert Espinel, 47, took bribes in exchange for approving gun licenses while they were working in the police department's gun licensing division. Prosecutors also charged two so-called "expediters" who paid bribes to help their clients get licenses.

WTO lets Mexico slap trade sanctions on U.S. in tuna dispute

WTO lets Mexico slap trade sanctions on U.S. in tuna dispute

Mexico can impose annual trade sanctions worth $163.23 million against the United States after winning a dispute over trade in tuna fish, a World Trade Organization arbitrator ruled on Tuesday. Mexico's economy ministry said it planned immediate action to initiate the trade sanctions. The sanctions award was only a third of the $472.3 million Mexico had asked for.

Officer says 'minimal but necessary force' used on United passenger

Officer says 'minimal but necessary force' used on United passenger

One of the police officers who forcibly removed a passenger from a United Airlines flight said "minimal but necessary force" was used in the incident that became a public relations disaster for the carrier, according to a report released by the city. Video recorded by other passengers showed David Dao, a 69-year-old doctor, being dragged down the aisle with blood on his face after refusing to give up his seat on a flight from Chicago to Louisville, Kentucky on April 9. Dao suffered a concussion and a broken nose, lost two front teeth and is likely to sue the airline, according to his lawyer, Thomas Demetrio.

New York City subway faces two lawsuits over disabled access

New York City subway faces two lawsuits over disabled access

Most of New York City's huge, aging subway system is inaccessible to disabled people, and its operator illegally discriminates against them by failing to fix the problems, disability rights advocates said in two lawsuits on Tuesday. According to complaints filed in federal and state courts in Manhattan, only 112 of the city's 472 subway stations are wheelchair-accessible, and even those often end up off-limits to disabled people because elevators break down so often. Nick Paolucci, a spokesman for the city's law department, called the plaintiff's claim against the city "misplaced" because the MTA and the New York City Transit Authority oversee subway operations.

Mexico plans immediate action on US imports after WTO tuna ruling

Mexico plans immediate action on US imports after WTO tuna ruling

The Mexican economy ministry said on Tuesday it would immediately initiate the process of taking retaliatory steps against U.S. imports following a ruling by the World Trade Organization in Mexico's favor in a dispute over tuna. "Mexico will immediately seek authorization ... to suspend benefits, and in parallel, will initiate the internal procedures necessary to make said suspension effective against imports of products from the USA," the ministry said in a statement. Mexico had complained to the WTO about U.S. tuna labeling rules that it said unfairly penalized its fishing industry, and had asked for retaliatory sanctions of $472.3 million, which it planned to impose on imports of U.S. high-fructose corn syrup.

Waymo testing self-driving car ride service in Arizona

Waymo testing self-driving car ride service in Arizona

Alphabet Inc's Waymo autonomous vehicle group will begin testing a self-driving car program for hundreds of families in Phoenix, Arizona and is buying 500 Chrysler minivans to do so, the companies said on Tuesday. Waymo, which along with Google is owned by Alphabet Inc, recently has been quietly testing the service for a handful of families, learning what potential customers would want from a ride service, the company said in a blog post. It urged people to apply to take part in an expanded test, which is the first public trial of Waymo's self-driving cars.

Arkansas carries out first double execution in U.S. since 2000

Arkansas carries out first double execution in U.S. since 2000

By Steve Barnes LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (Reuters) - Arkansas carried out back-to-back executions on Monday night, administering lethal injections to two men convicted of rape and murder to become the first U.S. state to put more than one inmate to death on the same day in 17 years. Marcel Williams, 46, was pronounced dead at 10:33 CDT, a little more than three hours after the execution of 52-year-old Jack Jones, according to officials at Cummins Unit prison, about 75 miles southeast of the state capital, Little Rock. The two men were among eight that the state had initially planned to execute over the course of 11 days this month, prompted by the impending expiration date of the state's supplies of midazolam, a sedative used as part of the three-drug protocol.

Arkansas preps for first U.S. double execution since 2000

Arkansas preps for first U.S. double execution since 2000

The U.S. Supreme Court denied last-minute appeals from one of two Arkansas killers scheduled for execution on Monday evening, clearing the way for the first of two back-to-back executions to proceed. Jack Jones, 52, who raped and killed a woman in 1995 and left her 11-year-old daughter for dead, and Marcel Williams, 46, who kidnapped, raped and murdered a woman in 1997, were scheduled for lethal injection in what would be the first time in 17 years that a U.S. state executed two inmates on the same day. The two men separately filed 11th-hour applications with the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday afternoon seeking to have their executions halted.

Trump pushes Democrats on border wall as government shutdown looms

Trump pushes Democrats on border wall as government shutdown looms

U.S. President Donald Trump pressed Democrats on Monday to include funds for his promised border wall with Mexico in spending legislation as lawmakers worked to avoid a looming shutdown of the federal government. Republicans control both chambers of Congress, but a White House-backed bill to gut former President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act, popularly known as Obamacare, failed to gather full party support and imploded last month.

Students sue UC Berkeley over canceled Ann Coulter speech

Students sue UC Berkeley over canceled Ann Coulter speech

(Reuters) - Students who invited conservative commentator Ann Coulter to speak at the University of California at Berkeley sued school officials on Monday, saying their cancellation of the event was discriminatory and violated free speech rights. The Berkeley College Republicans and the Young America's Foundation said in their lawsuit, filed in federal court in San Francisco, that U.C. Berkeley was violating their constitutional rights seeking to "burden or ban" events "involving the expression of conservative viewpoints." The groups named University of California President Janet Napolitano and other university officials in the lawsuit. Coulter had been scheduled to speak on April 27 but the appearance was canceled by the university, Berkeley citing violence that broke out at the campus in February hours before another right-wing media figure, Milo Yiannopoulos, was scheduled to speak.

State Department website posts article on Trump's Florida resort

State Department website posts article on Trump's Florida resort

By Yeganeh Torbati WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A U.S. State Department website on Monday took down an article it published this month about President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort which had prompted criticism from prominent ethics experts that the piece represented use of public office for private gain. The original article was posted on April 4 on the "Share America" website, overseen by the State Department's Bureau of International Information Programs. It was also shared on the websites and social media pages of several U.S. embassies, including those in the United Kingdom, Portugal and Albania, as well as the State Department's Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs.

Ex-Guinea minister charged with laundering bribes goes to trial

Ex-Guinea minister charged with laundering bribes goes to trial

In an opening statement, Assistant U.S. Attorney Lorinda Laryea told jurors in Manhattan federal court that Mahmoud Thiam, a U.S. citizen, used the money to fund a "lavish lifestyle" including a mansion and private schools for his children in New York. Thiam, 50, has pleaded not guilty to money laundering.

Teacher accused of kidnapping to face federal charges in Tennessee

Teacher accused of kidnapping to face federal charges in Tennessee

A former Tennessee schoolteacher accused of abducting a 15-year-old girl and taking her on a multistate odyssey that included sexual abuse before the pair were found in California will be returned to face federal kidnapping charges in Nashville. Tad Cummins, 50, appeared in U.S. District Court in Sacramento, California, on Monday on a charge of transporting Elizabeth Thomas across state lines for sex. U.S. Magistrate Judge Kendall Newman ordered Cummins to be kept in federal custody as a flight risk and a danger to others, and returned to Tennessee for trial.

U.S. charges investment bank vice president with insider trading

U.S. charges investment bank vice president with insider trading

An investment banking vice president and risk management specialist was criminally charged on Monday with insider trading in Neustar Inc before the advertising technology company agreed to be acquired by a private equity firm. Avaneesh Krishnamoorthy, an Indian citizen living in West New York, New Jersey, made about $48,000 trading Neustar stock and options in a brokerage account held by him and his wife, after learning that Golden Gate Capital was in talks to buy the company, court papers show. Shares of Neustar rose 21 percent last Dec. 14 after Golden Gate's takeover of the Sterling, Virginia-based company for about $2.9 billion including debt.

Two Bundy supporters convicted in Nevada, mistrial called on others

Two Bundy supporters convicted in Nevada, mistrial called on others

Gregory Burleson and Todd Engel, two of six Bundy supporters on trial Monday, were convicted of obstruction of justice and interstate travel in aid of extortion in a case that came to symbolize tensions in the American West over the federal ownership of land. Burleson also was found guilty of firearms charges and threatening and assault of a federal officer, according to Trisha Young, a spokeswoman for the Nevada District Attorney's Office.

Democratic state attorneys general decry student loan rework by Republicans

Democratic state attorneys general decry student loan rework by Republicans

By Lisa Lambert WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has been reworking student lending since her appointment in February, raising concerns among Democrats that she will undo former President Barack Obama's overhaul of college financial aid. On Monday, 21 state attorneys general, all Democrats, wrote to Republican DeVos decrying her decision to end the Education Department's work on reforming loan servicing, steps intended to ensure that borrowers understand their outstanding debt and repayment options.

Up in Smoke: Marijuana activists cuffed after lighting up at U.S. Capitol

Up in Smoke: Marijuana activists cuffed after lighting up at U.S. Capitol

Two dozen red-hatted protesters gathered on the grounds of the U.S. Capitol on Monday to call for easing federal marijuana laws, but police snuffed out the party by arresting four of them after they lit up joints. The activists, who carried marijuana-leaf flags and a sign saying "Let DC Tax and Regulate Marijuana," were calling for coast-to-coast legalization of the recreational use of marijuana and protections for those who use cannabis for medical reasons. The protest included the recitation of Buddhist, Jewish, Christian and Rastafarian prayers on the lawn outside the domed national landmark.

Former Haiti coup leader pleads guilty in U.S. drug case

Former Haiti coup leader pleads guilty in U.S. drug case

The leader of a 2004 coup that toppled Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide pleaded guilty on Monday to a money laundering charge related to an international drug trafficking scheme, the U.S. Department of Justice said. Guy Philippe, 49, admitted to one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering stemming from his receipt of cash payments tied to narcotics sales in the late 1990s and early 2000s, the Justice Department said. Prosecutors said Philippe, a former high-ranking official in the Haitian National Police, received more than $1.5 million of bribe payments to ensure the safe transit of drug shipments.

Ex-Eaton Vance portfolio manager to plead guilty to fraud in U.S. court

Ex-Eaton Vance portfolio manager to plead guilty to fraud in U.S. court

A former Eaton Vance Corp portfolio manager has agreed to plead guilty to having engaged in a fraudulent scheme involving call options that enabled him to illegally make $1.9 million, according to papers filed in Boston federal court on Monday. Kevin Amell, 45, a onetime vice president at the Boston-based asset management firm, agreed to plead guilty to securities fraud and forfeit $1.95 million as part of a deal in which prosecutors would seek a prison sentence of no more than 27 months, the documents said. A lawyer for Amell did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

New Orleans removes first of four statues deemed racially offensive

New Orleans removes first of four statues deemed racially offensive

Authorities took down the statue honoring the so-called Battle of Liberty Place, acting without notice and under the cover of darkness for security reasons, and will move it to a museum or other facility, Mayor Mitch Landrieu said. A federal court cleared the way for its removal in March. Erected in 1891, the monument commemorates an 1874 attack on the racially integrated city police and state militia by the white supremacist "Crescent City White League," the mayor's office said.

N.Y. appeals court to review conviction of ex-Goldman programmer

N.Y. appeals court to review conviction of ex-Goldman programmer

The nearly eight-year legal odyssey of former Goldman Sachs Group Inc programmer Sergey Aleynikov is not over, after New York State's highest court agreed to review his reinstated conviction for stealing high-frequency trading code. Aleynikov may appeal the conviction won by the office of Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance because "questions of law are involved which ought to be reviewed," the Court of Appeals said in an order dated April 20. The order came nearly three months after an intermediate appeals court in Manhattan voted 5-0 to revive Aleynikov's conviction on one count of stealing Goldman code as he prepared to join a Chicago start-up, Teza Technologies LLC.

Liberal U.S. justices lean toward death row inmate in mental health dispute

Liberal U.S. justices lean toward death row inmate in mental health dispute

Liberal U.S. Supreme Court justices on Monday indicated support for a convicted murderer held on Alabama's death row who argued he had a right to an independent medical expert to assess his mental health and potentially help him avoid execution. The legal fight involving Alabama inmate James McWilliams assumed greater importance in the past week after two death row inmates who Arkansas plans to execute, Don Davis and Bruce Ward, had their cases put on holding pending the Supreme Court's decision regarding McWilliams, due by the end of June.

Trump talks about Mars mission on call with record-breaking astronaut

Trump talks about Mars mission on call with record-breaking astronaut

Whitson, 57, turned a zero-gravity summersault during the video call from the International Space Station, where she serves as station commander. "What an amazing thing you've done," said Trump, speaking from the Oval Office on his first call with an astronaut serving aboard the $100 billion orbital outpost. "It's a huge honor to break a record like this," Whitson said with a beaming smile.

Anti-Semitic acts spiked since Trump election win, watchdog says

Anti-Semitic acts spiked since Trump election win, watchdog says

Anti-Semitic incidents, from bomb threats and cemetery desecration to assaults and bullying, have surged in the United States since the election of President Donald Trump, and a "heightened political atmosphere" played a role in the rise, the Anti-Defamation League said on Monday. Overall, the number of acts targeting Jews and Jewish institutions rose 34 percent in 2016 to 1,266 in 2016 and jumped 86 percent in the first quarter of 2017, the ADL said.

U.S. top court won't review Houston police shooting 'waistband' defense

U.S. top court won't review Houston police shooting 'waistband' defense

The justices, over a dissent by liberal Justice Sonia Sotomayor, let stand a lower court's dismissal of a civil rights lawsuit brought by Ricardo Salazar-Limon, the drunken driving suspect who was left partially paralyzed after the 2010 traffic stop, against the officer who shot him, Chris Thompson. The issue of police use of force has been in the spotlight in the United States following a series of shootings by officers of minorities in recent years as well as high-profile attacks on law enforcement officers. Sotomayor, writing in a dissent joined by fellow liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, said the court's refusal to take up the case continues a "disturbing trend" of shielding police officers from lawsuits and rarely intervening when they act wrongly.

Lawyer representing United passenger takes on American Airlines

Lawyer representing United passenger takes on American Airlines

The lawyer representing Dr. David Dao, who was dragged from a United Airlines plane, said he will also represent a woman whose clash with an American Airlines flight attendant went viral over the weekend. Thomas Demetrio told CNBC on Monday that he will represent both passengers whose recent confrontations with airline and airport employees sparked global outrage and prompted a nationwide conversation over U.S. carriers' treatment of passengers. The video is a microcosm of what's wrong with the airline industry today," Demetrio said in an interview with CNBC.

U.S. high court won't review WellCare ex-CEO fraud conviction

U.S. high court won't review WellCare ex-CEO fraud conviction

Farha began serving a three-year sentence at a minimum security federal prison in Alabama after the Atlanta-based 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld his conviction in August 2016. Farha had asked the justices to overturn his conviction, taking issue with the trial judge's handling of his case.

U.S. top court preserves Alabama campaign finance curbs

U.S. top court preserves Alabama campaign finance curbs

The Alabama Democratic Conference had asked the justices to review a September 2016 decision by the Atlanta-based 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that sided with the state and found that the law did not violate the organization's rights to free expression and free association under the U.S. Constitution.

U.S. Supreme Court snubs Chesapeake Energy in bonds dispute

U.S. Supreme Court snubs Chesapeake Energy in bonds dispute

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected a bid by natural gas company Chesapeake Energy Corp to avoid having to pay $438.7 million to investors in a bonds dispute. The justices refused to hear the Oklahoma City-based company's appeal of a September 2016 ruling by the New York-based 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in favor of bondholders. The appeals court said the payout was justified after Chesapeake Energy waited too long to tell bondholders of its plan to redeem $1.3 billion of their debt six years early.

education

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

President Trump lost his first fight over health care and Monday night he appeared to back off threats to force Democrats and Republicans to pay for the border wall. Fmr. GOP Congressman David Jolly and MNSBC's Joy Reid join Lawrence O'Donnell.

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Two conservative groups filed a lawsuit against the University of California at Berkeley claiming that a decision to cancel an appearance by the firebrand pundit Ann Coulter violated their right to free speech. The Berkeley College Republicans and Young America's Foundation, which had invited Coulter to speak on April 27, accused the university of seeking to silence conservative viewpoints and stifle political discourse at the famously progressive campus by imposing unreasonable demands on campus events involving certain "high-profile" speakers. "Defendants' discriminatory imposition of curfew and venue restrictions has resulted in the cancellation of two speaking engagements featuring prominent conservative speakers in the month of April, 2017," read the lawsuit filed in federal court in San Francisco.

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

The United States on Tuesday expressed "deep concern" over Turkish air strikes against Kurdish fighters in Syria and Iraq and said they were not authorized by the U.S.-led coalition fighting Islamic State. The raids in Iraq's Sinjar region and northeast Syria killed at least 20 in a campaign against groups linked to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), which has waged a three-decade insurgency against Turkey for Kurdish autonomy. Turkey is part of the U.S.-led military coalition fighting militants in Syria.

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Gov. Asa Hutchinson issued an order in February to execute eight men in 10 days in April because the state's stock of midazolam, a key lethal injection drug, expires at the end of the month.

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Several mummies and more than 1,000 figurines have been discovered at an ancient cemetery located at Luxor in Egypt, archaeologists reported. A team of archaeologists with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities uncovered the funerary complex during the ministry's ongoing excavations at the site. The funerary complex contains multiple tombs that were originally built for a man named Userhat, who was a judge in Luxor sometime during what modern-day archaeologists call Egypt's New Kingdom (1550–1070 B.C.) period, the ministry said in a statement.

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

Retail banking giant Wells Fargo has fixed problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan and will now be allowed to open new international branches, US banking regulators said Monday. A Treasury Department agency found this month found the bank's board as early as 2005 had received "regular" reports that employee firings and internal ethics complaints were related to unethical sales practices. Monday's announcement reversed an action taken by the Federal Reserve Board and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, which in December jointly found that Wells Fargo had failed to remedy problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan.

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

By David Mardiste AMARI AIR BASE, Estonia (Reuters) - Two of the U.S. Air Force's newest and most advanced jets landed in the Baltic state of Estonia for the first time on Tuesday, a symbolic gesture meant to reinforce the United States' commitment to the defense of NATO allies that border Russia. The visit of the F-35 stealth fighters, which flew from Britain and spent several hours in Estonia, is part of broader U.S. jet pilot training across Europe as the NATO alliance seeks to deter Moscow from any possible incursion in the Baltics. "This is a very clear message," Estonia's Defense Minister Margus Tsahkna told Reuters.

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

The US State Department has been caught promoting Donald Trump’s Florida golf club Mar-a-Lago, in another apparent ethics violation by the administration. The US Embassy in London's website, which the department is responsible for, featured an article titled “Mar a Lago: Winter White House”. It said Mr Trump “is not the first president to have access to Mar-a-Lago as a Florida retreat, but he is the first one to use it”.

Tennessee teacher planned to take 15-year-old girl to Mexico

Tennessee teacher planned to take 15-year-old girl to Mexico

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A Tennessee teacher charged with kidnapping a 15-year-old student and driving her to California had planned to take the girl to Mexico and took a boat from San Diego on a test run, according to federal court documents filed Monday.

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

The stated objective of the Hezbollah-coordinated press tour of southern Lebanon was to see new Israeli defensive installations on the border – indications, according to the powerful Shiite Lebanese militia, of Israeli fears of Hezbollah’s growing military might. The unprecedented spectacle appeared to be a deliberate and calculated breach of a UN Security Council resolution that bans non-state forces from bearing arms in southern Lebanon, and it illustrated the unmatched sway Hezbollah wields, and the impunity it enjoys throughout the country. Recommended: Hezbollah 101: Who is the militant group, and what does it want?

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

After months of college application tasks and an anxious waiting period, high school seniors are starting to receive college acceptance letters. Many students may be relieved, but the hard work isn't necessarily over. Two current undergraduates recently shared their college decision strategies to help you prepare to pick a college before National College Decision Day on May 1.

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

French presidential frontrunner Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday rejected accusations he was resting on his laurels after winning the first round of the election, insisting "nothing's won yet" in the race against the far right's Marine Le Pen. The 39-year-old centrist said his victory in Sunday's first round of voting was proof that pollsters -- who had long placed him second to Le Pen in the opening round -- "get it wrong". "Nothing's won yet," Macron said during a visit to a hospital near Paris.

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

A new survey commissioned by Comcast has ranked apartment-dweller's need for good internet, relative to other niceties like basic hygiene. The conclusion seems to be that good Wi-Fi and high-speed internet are viewed as being the most critical. Comcast probably commissioned this survey to show how relevant its brand is to millennials or something, but the only actual truth to be found is this: Comcast knows that you will put up with basically anything to get good internet, so it's going to squeeze you for every last penny. The survey polled 2015 building managers and developers in the US about what features are the most important for prospective renters. A majority (59%) had either Wi-Fi access or fast internet as the most important feature, comfortably beating out a washer-dryer in unit as the must-have. This isn't so much a statement on the value of technology as it is a stunning indictment of broadband technology in the US. In a supposedly technology-literate, competitive, first-world country, access to the internet should be a given. But thanks to the oligopoly of cable companies that control access to the internet with very little regional competition, you're often left with little or no choice of cable providers. That means that if Verizon or Comcast only choose to supply your building with a 10Mbps, you're out of luck. So really, this survey just confirms to Comcast an important fact about its customers: it doesn't matter how bad the customer service is or if it flat-out calls its customers idiots: you don't have any choice and you need internet, so pucker up, lucky consumers.

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

By Dan Levine SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A U.S. judge on Tuesday blocked President Donald Trump's executive order that sought to withhold federal funds from so-called sanctuary cities, dealing another legal blow to the administration's efforts to toughen immigration enforcement. The ruling from U.S. District Judge William Orrick III in San Francisco said Trump's Jan. 25 order targeted broad categories of federal funding for sanctuary governments and that plaintiffs challenging the order were likely to succeed in proving it unconstitutional.

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

MIAMI (AP) — A former Haitian coup leader and recently elected senator in that country pleaded guilty Monday to a U.S. drug money-laundering charge under a deal that should allow him to avoid a potential sentence of life in prison for cocaine trafficking.

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish warplanes struck suspected Kurdish rebel positions in Iraq and Syria on Tuesday, drawing condemnation from Baghdad and criticism from the U.S.-led coalition fighting the Islamic State group, which is allied with Kurdish factions in both countries.

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

Global warming has pushed the Arctic into a new state unprecedented in human history, with thinning and retreating sea ice, skyrocketing air and sea temperatures, melting permafrost, and glaciers that are shedding ice at increasing rates.  All of these impacts and more may seem remote at first — after all, few of us live in Nunavut — but if you're a coastal resident anywhere in the world, from New York City to Dhaka, Bangladesh, what happens in the Arctic will affect you during the next several decades and beyond, primarily through sea level rise.  SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming The economic effects of all Arctic warming impacts may be enough to dent the gross domestic product of some countries, with cost estimates ranging from $7 trillion to $90 trillion by the end of this century. These are the conclusions of a new, comprehensive assessment of the Arctic climate by a division of the Arctic Council — a cooperative, governing body that helps oversee development in the Far North.  Sea ice (TOP) meets land as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft above Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesThe scientific report, released on Tuesday, is known as Snow, Water, Ice, and Permafrost in the Arctic, or SWIPA. About 90 scientists helped produce the report, while more than two-dozen experts peer-reviewed the results.  The document contains two key findings that anyone concerned about the future of not just the Arctic, but the entire globe, should take note of.  The first is that the Arctic Ocean could be free of summer sea ice starting as early as the late 2030s, which is earlier than other estimates have shown. The second is that rapid Arctic warming is driving greater melting of land ice in the region, which led scientists to conclude that consensus projections of global sea level rise made in 2013 are too conservative. Compared to the previous SWIPA report, which was produced in 2011, the new assessment paints a far more dire picture of an Arctic climate in overdrive.  It also offers hope that action can be taken now to slow down and eventually stabilize Arctic warming after about the year 2050. But time is running out. Even with rapid action to curb global warming pollutants like carbon dioxide and methane, the Arctic most of us grew up with — featuring thick sea ice making the region virtually impenetrable year-round — is gone, and is not likely to return anytime in the next century.  Sea ice thickness trends, showing the thinning trend in recent years.Image: zack labe"... The Arctic of today is different in many respects from the Arctic of the past century, or even the Arctic of 20 years ago," the report states. "Many of the changes underway are due to a simple fact: Ice, snow, and frozen ground — the components of the Arctic cryosphere — are sensitive to heat."  Based on computer model projections, the report states that average fall and winter temperatures in the Arctic will increase up to 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, above late 20th century values by the middle of the century, even if relatively stringent greenhouse gas emissions cuts are made.  Such temperature thresholds are already being reached in some months, with January 2016 recording a temperature anomaly of 9 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981-2010 average for the region, with even higher anomalies seen during October through February of the same year.  This past winter was the warmest on record for the Arctic, and for the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter. This has left sea ice in a precariously thin and sparse state as the upcoming melt season nears.  The report contains valuable findings on what would happen to Arctic climate change if the world were to come close to meeting the goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement. That treaty, which went into force in November 2016, aims to keep global warming to well under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through the year 2100.  It's unclear whether the agreement's goals are still feasible, considering that the U.S. — the world's second-largest emitter — is considering pulling out of it altogether, and other nations have yet to offer plans to cut their emissions in line with the temperature target.  A "drunken forest" in Fairbanks Alaska where trees are collapsing into the ground due to permafrost melt.Image: Warming Images/REX/ShutterstockMeeting the Paris targets would help slow the pace and reduce the severity of Arctic warming, but it "would not stabilize the loss of Arctic glaciers, ice sheets, and ice caps," the report states.  "The recent SWIPA assessment tells that the changes in the Arctic are bound to continue at the current rate until mid-century," said Morten Skovgaard Olsen, who chaired the new report, in an email.  "But it also tells that immediate and ambitious green-house gas reductions will slow the speed of changes beyond mid-century and even stabilize change beyond mid century, preventing major further impacts associated with the Arctic melt .” Any carbon pollution cuts made now will have the most significant influence on what the Arctic will look like after about 2050, the report's authors said at a press conference Tuesday in Virginia.  “The changes are cumulative, and so what we do in the next 5 years is really important on slowing down the changes that will happen in the next 30 or 40 years," said James Overland, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  "The emphasis on action and immediacy is one of the main findings” from the report, he said.  NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice near Pituffik, Greenland.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesForeign ministers from the eight Arctic nations will meet in Fairbanks, Alaska on May 11 to discuss these findings and other issues pertaining to the region. Some discussion on the Paris agreement may take place, particularly along the sidelines of the talks. According to the SWIPA report, meltwater from Arctic glaciers has contributed 35 percent of current sea level rise, with the greatest contribution coming from Greenland.  The planet's largest island lost an average of 375 gigatons of ice per year. This is equivalent to losing a block of ice measuring 4.6 miles on all sides, from 2011 to 2014 alone. It amounts to twice the melt rate from 2003 to 2008. In addition, thawing permafrost is harming infrastructure from Alaska to Siberia, with landslides and mysterious craters swallowing parts of the Russian Arctic.  In Alaska, the report found that wildfires in taiga forests are worse now than at any time in the past 10,000 years, due to hotter, drier summers and earlier spring snowmelt. WATCH: Stunning drone footage captures rare video of blue whales feeding

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

The US Supreme Court on Monday turned back an appeal by rights groups seeking to make public a damning report on the CIA's post-September 11 torture program, ensuring it will remain secret. The court rebuffed arguments from the American Civil Liberties Union that the highly classified report, compiled in 2014 by the Senate Intelligence Committee, should be released based on US government transparency rules. "We are disappointed by this major setback for government transparency and accountability.

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

By Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United States slammed South Sudan's President Salva Kiir on Tuesday for the African state's "man-made" famine and ongoing conflict, urging him to fulfill a month-old pledge of a unilateral truce by ordering his troops back to their barracks. "We must see a sign that progress is possible," U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley told a United Nations Security Council briefing on South Sudan. "We must see that ceasefire implemented." South Sudan descended into civil war in 2013 after Kiir fired his deputy, unleashing a conflict that has spawned armed factions often following ethnic lines.

20 Ways To Save Money

20 Ways To Save Money

Some are tougher to achieve than others, and you'll need to weigh the necessary sacrifice against the return.

Behold: This Galaxy Note 8 blows the Galaxy S8 out of the water

Behold: This Galaxy Note 8 blows the Galaxy S8 out of the water

Samsung's Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ were finally released this past Friday, and it seems like the phones are already well on their way to becoming a smash hit. The South Korean electronics giant announced Monday morning that combined Galaxy S8 and S8+ pre-orders out-sold Samsung's previous-generation Galaxy S7 and S7 edge by 30%. As a quick reminder, the S7 and S7 edge were Samsung's best-selling phones ever. If you picked up a new Galaxy S8 on Friday or over the weekend, rest assured that you now hold the most stunning smartphones that have ever existed. They're also two of the most powerful smartphones that have ever existed. In fact, there's almost nothing on Earth that could possibly give you buyer's remorse. Almost nothing... When an early adopter buys a new flagship iPhone, he or she knows that there will be a full year to wait (and save up money) before an even better new flagship iPhone launches. In Samsung's case, however, there's a much shorter buffer in between flagship releases. In the first half of each year, Samsung updates its Galaxy S lineup. The Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ are the company's flagship smartphones for the first half of 2017 and as you read in our Galaxy S8 review, they're incredible. Then, in the second half of 2017, Samsung will update its Note line with the all-new Galaxy Note 8. If the Note 8 looks anything like this, Galaxy S8 and S8+ owners should prepare to be very, very jealous. Graphic designer Muhsin M. Belaal Auckburaully teamed up with YouTube channel DBS Designing to completely reimagine Samsung's Galaxy Note series using design cues from the Galaxy S8 along with rumors we've heard so far. The results, as you can see, are absolutely stunning. Unlike most concept smartphones we see out there, this Galaxy Note 8 is actually rooted in reality. It likely doesn't look exactly like the Note 8 Samsung will release later this year, but we're willing to bet that it's close. Hopefully Samsung sticks with the precedent set by the Galaxy S8, however, and ditches that distracting logo from the front of the phone. As for specs, Auckburaully stays well within the realm of reality by sticking with the rumors we've heard so far. The Note 8 should feature a huge 6.4-inch QHD+ display and a screen-to-body ratio that's even better than the 83% ratio on the Galaxy S8. Other expected specs include 6GB of RAM, 64GB or 128GB of storage, microSDXC support, a new dual-lens rear camera setup, an iris scanner, and a huge 4,000 mAh battery that hopefully doesn't explode. More images of Auckburaully's Galaxy Note 8 design can be seen on his Behance page, and a video featuring the design is embedded below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0p3CAs9ZP0

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

Less than two years after officially launching its Pony Car beyond its domestic US borders, the Ford Mustang is the world's best-selling sportscar. In all, Ford sold 150,000 Mustangs around the world in 2016 which, according to the latest industry data from IHS Markit, means the car is not only America's most popular sportscar, it has now conquered the world, too, despite some hard-hitting European and Japanese competition. The Mustang has outsold the Mazda MX-5 Miata, BMW 4 Series, Nissan 370Z and the venerable Porsche 911 among others to claim the top spot, leaving many to ponder why it took Ford so long -- 51 years -- to finally offer its most famous muscle car to European and Asian customers.

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

SAO PAULO (AP) — Twelve men suspected of taking part in a dramatic, multimillion-dollar theft from an armored car company in a Paraguayan border city have been arrested in Brazil, officials in the Brazilian Federal Police said Tuesday.

Iran nuclear deal under review as uncertainty grows

Iran nuclear deal under review as uncertainty grows

Iran and major powers met Tuesday in Vienna to review adherence to their 2015 nuclear deal as uncertainty grows about the landmark accord's future under US President Donald Trump. The regular quarterly meeting heard, as Washington confirmed last week, that Iran is sticking to its side of the deal with the United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany, diplomats said. The accord saw Tehran drastically curb its nuclear activities in order to ease concerns that Iran wanted to build an atomic bomb.

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

Reports of American workers being short on their retirement funds are rampant. The National Institute on Retirement Security frames the "underfunded" issue in real dollar terms, noting that retirement savings are "dangerously low", and the U.S. retirement savings deficit is between $6.8 and $14 trillion. Yes, too many Americans are underfunded in the retirement accounts -- but how do you know exactly how much you're underfunded?

Scots don't want another independence vote: Kantar poll

Scots don't want another independence vote: Kantar poll

Most Scottish voters do not want another referendum on independence from the United Kingdom and support for secession itself appears to have weakened, according to a Kantar survey. Scots voted by a wide margin to stick with the European Union in last June's referendum, clashing with the UK as a whole which voted to leave. Scotland's devolved government, run by the Scottish National Party (SNP), says this means the country should be given a new chance to decide whether it wants to split from the UK.

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Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

President Trump lost his first fight over health care and Monday night he appeared to back off threats to force Democrats and Republicans to pay for the border wall. Fmr. GOP Congressman David Jolly and MNSBC's Joy Reid join Lawrence O'Donnell.

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Two conservative groups filed a lawsuit against the University of California at Berkeley claiming that a decision to cancel an appearance by the firebrand pundit Ann Coulter violated their right to free speech. The Berkeley College Republicans and Young America's Foundation, which had invited Coulter to speak on April 27, accused the university of seeking to silence conservative viewpoints and stifle political discourse at the famously progressive campus by imposing unreasonable demands on campus events involving certain "high-profile" speakers. "Defendants' discriminatory imposition of curfew and venue restrictions has resulted in the cancellation of two speaking engagements featuring prominent conservative speakers in the month of April, 2017," read the lawsuit filed in federal court in San Francisco.

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

The United States on Tuesday expressed "deep concern" over Turkish air strikes against Kurdish fighters in Syria and Iraq and said they were not authorized by the U.S.-led coalition fighting Islamic State. The raids in Iraq's Sinjar region and northeast Syria killed at least 20 in a campaign against groups linked to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), which has waged a three-decade insurgency against Turkey for Kurdish autonomy. Turkey is part of the U.S.-led military coalition fighting militants in Syria.

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Gov. Asa Hutchinson issued an order in February to execute eight men in 10 days in April because the state's stock of midazolam, a key lethal injection drug, expires at the end of the month.

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Several mummies and more than 1,000 figurines have been discovered at an ancient cemetery located at Luxor in Egypt, archaeologists reported. A team of archaeologists with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities uncovered the funerary complex during the ministry's ongoing excavations at the site. The funerary complex contains multiple tombs that were originally built for a man named Userhat, who was a judge in Luxor sometime during what modern-day archaeologists call Egypt's New Kingdom (1550–1070 B.C.) period, the ministry said in a statement.

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

Retail banking giant Wells Fargo has fixed problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan and will now be allowed to open new international branches, US banking regulators said Monday. A Treasury Department agency found this month found the bank's board as early as 2005 had received "regular" reports that employee firings and internal ethics complaints were related to unethical sales practices. Monday's announcement reversed an action taken by the Federal Reserve Board and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, which in December jointly found that Wells Fargo had failed to remedy problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan.

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

By David Mardiste AMARI AIR BASE, Estonia (Reuters) - Two of the U.S. Air Force's newest and most advanced jets landed in the Baltic state of Estonia for the first time on Tuesday, a symbolic gesture meant to reinforce the United States' commitment to the defense of NATO allies that border Russia. The visit of the F-35 stealth fighters, which flew from Britain and spent several hours in Estonia, is part of broader U.S. jet pilot training across Europe as the NATO alliance seeks to deter Moscow from any possible incursion in the Baltics. "This is a very clear message," Estonia's Defense Minister Margus Tsahkna told Reuters.

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

The US State Department has been caught promoting Donald Trump’s Florida golf club Mar-a-Lago, in another apparent ethics violation by the administration. The US Embassy in London's website, which the department is responsible for, featured an article titled “Mar a Lago: Winter White House”. It said Mr Trump “is not the first president to have access to Mar-a-Lago as a Florida retreat, but he is the first one to use it”.

Tennessee teacher planned to take 15-year-old girl to Mexico

Tennessee teacher planned to take 15-year-old girl to Mexico

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A Tennessee teacher charged with kidnapping a 15-year-old student and driving her to California had planned to take the girl to Mexico and took a boat from San Diego on a test run, according to federal court documents filed Monday.

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

The stated objective of the Hezbollah-coordinated press tour of southern Lebanon was to see new Israeli defensive installations on the border – indications, according to the powerful Shiite Lebanese militia, of Israeli fears of Hezbollah’s growing military might. The unprecedented spectacle appeared to be a deliberate and calculated breach of a UN Security Council resolution that bans non-state forces from bearing arms in southern Lebanon, and it illustrated the unmatched sway Hezbollah wields, and the impunity it enjoys throughout the country. Recommended: Hezbollah 101: Who is the militant group, and what does it want?

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

After months of college application tasks and an anxious waiting period, high school seniors are starting to receive college acceptance letters. Many students may be relieved, but the hard work isn't necessarily over. Two current undergraduates recently shared their college decision strategies to help you prepare to pick a college before National College Decision Day on May 1.

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

French presidential frontrunner Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday rejected accusations he was resting on his laurels after winning the first round of the election, insisting "nothing's won yet" in the race against the far right's Marine Le Pen. The 39-year-old centrist said his victory in Sunday's first round of voting was proof that pollsters -- who had long placed him second to Le Pen in the opening round -- "get it wrong". "Nothing's won yet," Macron said during a visit to a hospital near Paris.

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

A new survey commissioned by Comcast has ranked apartment-dweller's need for good internet, relative to other niceties like basic hygiene. The conclusion seems to be that good Wi-Fi and high-speed internet are viewed as being the most critical. Comcast probably commissioned this survey to show how relevant its brand is to millennials or something, but the only actual truth to be found is this: Comcast knows that you will put up with basically anything to get good internet, so it's going to squeeze you for every last penny. The survey polled 2015 building managers and developers in the US about what features are the most important for prospective renters. A majority (59%) had either Wi-Fi access or fast internet as the most important feature, comfortably beating out a washer-dryer in unit as the must-have. This isn't so much a statement on the value of technology as it is a stunning indictment of broadband technology in the US. In a supposedly technology-literate, competitive, first-world country, access to the internet should be a given. But thanks to the oligopoly of cable companies that control access to the internet with very little regional competition, you're often left with little or no choice of cable providers. That means that if Verizon or Comcast only choose to supply your building with a 10Mbps, you're out of luck. So really, this survey just confirms to Comcast an important fact about its customers: it doesn't matter how bad the customer service is or if it flat-out calls its customers idiots: you don't have any choice and you need internet, so pucker up, lucky consumers.

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

By Dan Levine SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A U.S. judge on Tuesday blocked President Donald Trump's executive order that sought to withhold federal funds from so-called sanctuary cities, dealing another legal blow to the administration's efforts to toughen immigration enforcement. The ruling from U.S. District Judge William Orrick III in San Francisco said Trump's Jan. 25 order targeted broad categories of federal funding for sanctuary governments and that plaintiffs challenging the order were likely to succeed in proving it unconstitutional.

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

MIAMI (AP) — A former Haitian coup leader and recently elected senator in that country pleaded guilty Monday to a U.S. drug money-laundering charge under a deal that should allow him to avoid a potential sentence of life in prison for cocaine trafficking.

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish warplanes struck suspected Kurdish rebel positions in Iraq and Syria on Tuesday, drawing condemnation from Baghdad and criticism from the U.S.-led coalition fighting the Islamic State group, which is allied with Kurdish factions in both countries.

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

Global warming has pushed the Arctic into a new state unprecedented in human history, with thinning and retreating sea ice, skyrocketing air and sea temperatures, melting permafrost, and glaciers that are shedding ice at increasing rates.  All of these impacts and more may seem remote at first — after all, few of us live in Nunavut — but if you're a coastal resident anywhere in the world, from New York City to Dhaka, Bangladesh, what happens in the Arctic will affect you during the next several decades and beyond, primarily through sea level rise.  SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming The economic effects of all Arctic warming impacts may be enough to dent the gross domestic product of some countries, with cost estimates ranging from $7 trillion to $90 trillion by the end of this century. These are the conclusions of a new, comprehensive assessment of the Arctic climate by a division of the Arctic Council — a cooperative, governing body that helps oversee development in the Far North.  Sea ice (TOP) meets land as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft above Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesThe scientific report, released on Tuesday, is known as Snow, Water, Ice, and Permafrost in the Arctic, or SWIPA. About 90 scientists helped produce the report, while more than two-dozen experts peer-reviewed the results.  The document contains two key findings that anyone concerned about the future of not just the Arctic, but the entire globe, should take note of.  The first is that the Arctic Ocean could be free of summer sea ice starting as early as the late 2030s, which is earlier than other estimates have shown. The second is that rapid Arctic warming is driving greater melting of land ice in the region, which led scientists to conclude that consensus projections of global sea level rise made in 2013 are too conservative. Compared to the previous SWIPA report, which was produced in 2011, the new assessment paints a far more dire picture of an Arctic climate in overdrive.  It also offers hope that action can be taken now to slow down and eventually stabilize Arctic warming after about the year 2050. But time is running out. Even with rapid action to curb global warming pollutants like carbon dioxide and methane, the Arctic most of us grew up with — featuring thick sea ice making the region virtually impenetrable year-round — is gone, and is not likely to return anytime in the next century.  Sea ice thickness trends, showing the thinning trend in recent years.Image: zack labe"... The Arctic of today is different in many respects from the Arctic of the past century, or even the Arctic of 20 years ago," the report states. "Many of the changes underway are due to a simple fact: Ice, snow, and frozen ground — the components of the Arctic cryosphere — are sensitive to heat."  Based on computer model projections, the report states that average fall and winter temperatures in the Arctic will increase up to 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, above late 20th century values by the middle of the century, even if relatively stringent greenhouse gas emissions cuts are made.  Such temperature thresholds are already being reached in some months, with January 2016 recording a temperature anomaly of 9 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981-2010 average for the region, with even higher anomalies seen during October through February of the same year.  This past winter was the warmest on record for the Arctic, and for the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter. This has left sea ice in a precariously thin and sparse state as the upcoming melt season nears.  The report contains valuable findings on what would happen to Arctic climate change if the world were to come close to meeting the goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement. That treaty, which went into force in November 2016, aims to keep global warming to well under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through the year 2100.  It's unclear whether the agreement's goals are still feasible, considering that the U.S. — the world's second-largest emitter — is considering pulling out of it altogether, and other nations have yet to offer plans to cut their emissions in line with the temperature target.  A "drunken forest" in Fairbanks Alaska where trees are collapsing into the ground due to permafrost melt.Image: Warming Images/REX/ShutterstockMeeting the Paris targets would help slow the pace and reduce the severity of Arctic warming, but it "would not stabilize the loss of Arctic glaciers, ice sheets, and ice caps," the report states.  "The recent SWIPA assessment tells that the changes in the Arctic are bound to continue at the current rate until mid-century," said Morten Skovgaard Olsen, who chaired the new report, in an email.  "But it also tells that immediate and ambitious green-house gas reductions will slow the speed of changes beyond mid-century and even stabilize change beyond mid century, preventing major further impacts associated with the Arctic melt .” Any carbon pollution cuts made now will have the most significant influence on what the Arctic will look like after about 2050, the report's authors said at a press conference Tuesday in Virginia.  “The changes are cumulative, and so what we do in the next 5 years is really important on slowing down the changes that will happen in the next 30 or 40 years," said James Overland, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  "The emphasis on action and immediacy is one of the main findings” from the report, he said.  NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice near Pituffik, Greenland.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesForeign ministers from the eight Arctic nations will meet in Fairbanks, Alaska on May 11 to discuss these findings and other issues pertaining to the region. Some discussion on the Paris agreement may take place, particularly along the sidelines of the talks. According to the SWIPA report, meltwater from Arctic glaciers has contributed 35 percent of current sea level rise, with the greatest contribution coming from Greenland.  The planet's largest island lost an average of 375 gigatons of ice per year. This is equivalent to losing a block of ice measuring 4.6 miles on all sides, from 2011 to 2014 alone. It amounts to twice the melt rate from 2003 to 2008. In addition, thawing permafrost is harming infrastructure from Alaska to Siberia, with landslides and mysterious craters swallowing parts of the Russian Arctic.  In Alaska, the report found that wildfires in taiga forests are worse now than at any time in the past 10,000 years, due to hotter, drier summers and earlier spring snowmelt. WATCH: Stunning drone footage captures rare video of blue whales feeding

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

The US Supreme Court on Monday turned back an appeal by rights groups seeking to make public a damning report on the CIA's post-September 11 torture program, ensuring it will remain secret. The court rebuffed arguments from the American Civil Liberties Union that the highly classified report, compiled in 2014 by the Senate Intelligence Committee, should be released based on US government transparency rules. "We are disappointed by this major setback for government transparency and accountability.

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

By Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United States slammed South Sudan's President Salva Kiir on Tuesday for the African state's "man-made" famine and ongoing conflict, urging him to fulfill a month-old pledge of a unilateral truce by ordering his troops back to their barracks. "We must see a sign that progress is possible," U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley told a United Nations Security Council briefing on South Sudan. "We must see that ceasefire implemented." South Sudan descended into civil war in 2013 after Kiir fired his deputy, unleashing a conflict that has spawned armed factions often following ethnic lines.

20 Ways To Save Money

20 Ways To Save Money

Some are tougher to achieve than others, and you'll need to weigh the necessary sacrifice against the return.

Behold: This Galaxy Note 8 blows the Galaxy S8 out of the water

Behold: This Galaxy Note 8 blows the Galaxy S8 out of the water

Samsung's Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ were finally released this past Friday, and it seems like the phones are already well on their way to becoming a smash hit. The South Korean electronics giant announced Monday morning that combined Galaxy S8 and S8+ pre-orders out-sold Samsung's previous-generation Galaxy S7 and S7 edge by 30%. As a quick reminder, the S7 and S7 edge were Samsung's best-selling phones ever. If you picked up a new Galaxy S8 on Friday or over the weekend, rest assured that you now hold the most stunning smartphones that have ever existed. They're also two of the most powerful smartphones that have ever existed. In fact, there's almost nothing on Earth that could possibly give you buyer's remorse. Almost nothing... When an early adopter buys a new flagship iPhone, he or she knows that there will be a full year to wait (and save up money) before an even better new flagship iPhone launches. In Samsung's case, however, there's a much shorter buffer in between flagship releases. In the first half of each year, Samsung updates its Galaxy S lineup. The Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ are the company's flagship smartphones for the first half of 2017 and as you read in our Galaxy S8 review, they're incredible. Then, in the second half of 2017, Samsung will update its Note line with the all-new Galaxy Note 8. If the Note 8 looks anything like this, Galaxy S8 and S8+ owners should prepare to be very, very jealous. Graphic designer Muhsin M. Belaal Auckburaully teamed up with YouTube channel DBS Designing to completely reimagine Samsung's Galaxy Note series using design cues from the Galaxy S8 along with rumors we've heard so far. The results, as you can see, are absolutely stunning. Unlike most concept smartphones we see out there, this Galaxy Note 8 is actually rooted in reality. It likely doesn't look exactly like the Note 8 Samsung will release later this year, but we're willing to bet that it's close. Hopefully Samsung sticks with the precedent set by the Galaxy S8, however, and ditches that distracting logo from the front of the phone. As for specs, Auckburaully stays well within the realm of reality by sticking with the rumors we've heard so far. The Note 8 should feature a huge 6.4-inch QHD+ display and a screen-to-body ratio that's even better than the 83% ratio on the Galaxy S8. Other expected specs include 6GB of RAM, 64GB or 128GB of storage, microSDXC support, a new dual-lens rear camera setup, an iris scanner, and a huge 4,000 mAh battery that hopefully doesn't explode. More images of Auckburaully's Galaxy Note 8 design can be seen on his Behance page, and a video featuring the design is embedded below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0p3CAs9ZP0

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

Less than two years after officially launching its Pony Car beyond its domestic US borders, the Ford Mustang is the world's best-selling sportscar. In all, Ford sold 150,000 Mustangs around the world in 2016 which, according to the latest industry data from IHS Markit, means the car is not only America's most popular sportscar, it has now conquered the world, too, despite some hard-hitting European and Japanese competition. The Mustang has outsold the Mazda MX-5 Miata, BMW 4 Series, Nissan 370Z and the venerable Porsche 911 among others to claim the top spot, leaving many to ponder why it took Ford so long -- 51 years -- to finally offer its most famous muscle car to European and Asian customers.

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

SAO PAULO (AP) — Twelve men suspected of taking part in a dramatic, multimillion-dollar theft from an armored car company in a Paraguayan border city have been arrested in Brazil, officials in the Brazilian Federal Police said Tuesday.

Iran nuclear deal under review as uncertainty grows

Iran nuclear deal under review as uncertainty grows

Iran and major powers met Tuesday in Vienna to review adherence to their 2015 nuclear deal as uncertainty grows about the landmark accord's future under US President Donald Trump. The regular quarterly meeting heard, as Washington confirmed last week, that Iran is sticking to its side of the deal with the United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany, diplomats said. The accord saw Tehran drastically curb its nuclear activities in order to ease concerns that Iran wanted to build an atomic bomb.

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

Reports of American workers being short on their retirement funds are rampant. The National Institute on Retirement Security frames the "underfunded" issue in real dollar terms, noting that retirement savings are "dangerously low", and the U.S. retirement savings deficit is between $6.8 and $14 trillion. Yes, too many Americans are underfunded in the retirement accounts -- but how do you know exactly how much you're underfunded?

Scots don't want another independence vote: Kantar poll

Scots don't want another independence vote: Kantar poll

Most Scottish voters do not want another referendum on independence from the United Kingdom and support for secession itself appears to have weakened, according to a Kantar survey. Scots voted by a wide margin to stick with the European Union in last June's referendum, clashing with the UK as a whole which voted to leave. Scotland's devolved government, run by the Scottish National Party (SNP), says this means the country should be given a new chance to decide whether it wants to split from the UK.

politics

From inauguration to 100th day: President Trump’s rocky ride in pictures

From inauguration to 100th day: President Trump’s rocky ride in pictures

Just 100 days into his term, Donald Trump’s young presidency has already provided its share of memorable moments, from his speech to a joint meeting of Congress to his decision to rain cruise missiles on a Syrian base in response to a chemical attack that killed civilians, including children. He has hosted a virtual parade of world leaders, seen his Supreme Court pick confirmed, and held some rallies that recall the mood of his boisterous, unorthodox campaign, all while trying to lay the groundwork for still-elusive legislative achievements.

The Ever-Trumpers: ‘He’s a good salesman. He needs to sell them.’

The Ever-Trumpers: ‘He’s a good salesman. He needs to sell them.’

A little more than a year ago, as Donald Trump was solidifying his frontrunner status for the Republican nomination in the face of a mounting toll of gaffes and outrageous pronouncements, Yahoo News set out to answer the question that had many establishment Republicans scratching their heads: Who are his supporters, anyway? “People wanted change,” the 80-year-old grandmother from Kiln, Miss., said recently.

The Ever-Trumpers: The Afghan bomb strike is ‘a wake-up call to people’

The Ever-Trumpers: The Afghan bomb strike is ‘a wake-up call to people’

A little more than a year ago, as Donald Trump was solidifying his frontrunner status for the Republican nomination in the face of a mounting toll of gaffes and outrageous pronouncements, Yahoo News set out to answer the question that had many establishment Republicans scratching their heads: Who are his supporters, anyway? Now, with the president’s approval ratings near historic lows, we have gone back to these voters for their views about his presidency as it nears the 100-day mark. The first time I met Eileen Schmidt was a little over a year ago as she stood listening to Donald Trump speak at what became a rowdy rally at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, back when the New York real estate mogul was still a long shot in his bid for the GOP nomination, much less the presidency.

The Ever-Trumpers: ‘Let him make the mistakes … then let’s evaluate it’

The Ever-Trumpers: ‘Let him make the mistakes … then let’s evaluate it’

A little more than a year ago, as Donald Trump was solidifying his frontrunner status for the Republican nomination in the face of a mounting toll of gaffes and outrageous pronouncements, Yahoo News set out to answer the question that had many establishment Republicans scratching their heads: Who are his supporters, anyway? Now, with the president’s approval ratings near historic lows, we have gone back to these voters for their views about his presidency as it nears the 100-day mark. Or energized by the president’s continued outspokenness?

The Ever-Trumpers: ‘I never expected consistency, so I’m not surprised or shocked’

The Ever-Trumpers: ‘I never expected consistency, so I’m not surprised or shocked’

A little more than a year ago, as Donald Trump was solidifying his frontrunner status for the Republican nomination in the face of a mounting toll of gaffes and outrageous pronouncements, Yahoo News set out to answer the question that had many establishment Republicans scratching their heads: Who are his supporters, anyway? Now, with the president’s approval ratings near historic lows, we have gone back to these voters for their views about his presidency as it nears the 100-day mark. In recent days, Beltway pundits have taken to speculating that President Trump’s rapid-fire reversals on a dizzying array of subjects — Syria, Russia, NATO, China, the Export-Import Bank — might strike his voters as a betrayal of sorts: proof that the candidate they cast their ballots for isn’t the president they wanted him to be.

The Ever-Trumpers: ‘Get off the Twitter!’

The Ever-Trumpers: ‘Get off the Twitter!’

A little more than a year ago, as Donald Trump was solidifying his frontrunner status for the Republican nomination in the face of a mounting toll of gaffes and outrageous pronouncements, Yahoo News set out to answer the question that had many establishment Republicans scratching their heads: Who are his supporters, anyway? Are they disappointed that Obamacare hasn’t been repealed? Justin Neal voted for Donald Trump because he wanted an economic turnaround, and because he felt too many Americans were dependent on the government.

Donald Trump’s Russian riddle

Donald Trump’s Russian riddle

Russian cyberattacks during the election, ties between Trump advisers and the Kremlin, investigations: What do they all add up to? Here’s what we know.

What Trump has done for, and to, the environment in his first 100 days

What Trump has done for, and to, the environment in his first 100 days

President Trump’s actions during his first 100 days have not won over environmentalists. Donald Trump’s election victory, after a campaign characterized by railing against environmental regulations and dismissing the work of climate scientists, sent shivers through the environmental and scientific communities. During his first 100 days in office, the brash and unpredictable president has been following through on his campaign promises to bolster the oil, coal and natural gas industries and reverse the eco-friendly policies of his predecessor, former President Barack Obama.

Voices from overseas: People from around the world consider Trump's first 100 days

Voices from overseas: People from around the world consider Trump's first 100 days

It was the most stunning political victory of the 21st century, one that brought shocked concern in many parts of the world and cheers in others. One uncontroversial certainty was that it would cause reverberations around the globe. Donald Trump campaigned on an “America First” platform, but has found himself as president drawn into thorny geopolitical complexities aplenty in the first 100 days of his administration.

Ronald Reagan’s son defends O’Reilly, asks if men should ‘sue for sexual arousal’

Ronald Reagan’s son defends O’Reilly, asks if men should ‘sue for sexual arousal’

Michael Reagan speaks at a rally for Republican Senate candidate Sharron Angle in 2010. Michael Reagan, son of late President Ronald Reagan, defended disgraced Fox News host Bill O’Reilly, who was ousted this week after advertisers boycotted the show en masse amid a sexual harassment scandal. The firestorm started after the New York Times revealed that O’Reilly and the network had shelled out $13 million in settlements to various women who had accused him of sexual harassment.

Clinton knocks Trump on LGBT rights

Clinton knocks Trump on LGBT rights

Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivers remarks at the annual LGBT Center dinner on April 20, 2017, in New York City. The Center gave Clinton its Trailblazer Award. Clinton was receiving an award at a fundraiser for The Center, an LGBT community center in New York City, where she made the critical remarks.

Rep. Chaffetz floats the idea he may resign before term ends

Rep. Chaffetz floats the idea he may resign before term ends

Utah congressman Jason Chaffetz told multiple Salt Lake City media outlets Thursday that he might not finish out his term. “When I contemplate another 200 nights away from home, it is just too much,” Chaffetz told Fox 13 News Anchor Bob Evans. Chaffetz also texted KSL Radio host Doug Wright on Thursday morning that it was possible he would not finish his term.

Campaign books that help shatter our politics

Campaign books that help shatter our politics

In the beginning there was Theodore White, the legendary observer of 20th century presidential campaigns, with his “Making of the President 1960.” Then there was Joe McGinniss’ brilliant account of the first iteration of modern campaign consulting, “The Selling of the President,” and Hunter S. Thompson’s dystopian companion piece, “Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail ’72.” Many years later, Richard Ben Cramer wrote “What It Takes,” the “Ulysses” of campaign chronicles.

5 takeaways from Jon Ossoff’s showing in the Georgia special election

5 takeaways from Jon Ossoff’s showing in the Georgia special election

To no one’s real surprise, President Trump and Jon Ossoff came to different conclusions regarding the final results of Tuesday’s special election in Georgia. On balance, however, Ossoff may have more to brag about than the president. 1. Jon Ossoff was never likely to win the Sixth District primary outright.

crime-trials

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

Pres. Trump's Threat to Congress Fails

President Trump lost his first fight over health care and Monday night he appeared to back off threats to force Democrats and Republicans to pay for the border wall. Fmr. GOP Congressman David Jolly and MNSBC's Joy Reid join Lawrence O'Donnell.

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Groups sue UC Berkeley over Ann Coulter appearance

Two conservative groups filed a lawsuit against the University of California at Berkeley claiming that a decision to cancel an appearance by the firebrand pundit Ann Coulter violated their right to free speech. The Berkeley College Republicans and Young America's Foundation, which had invited Coulter to speak on April 27, accused the university of seeking to silence conservative viewpoints and stifle political discourse at the famously progressive campus by imposing unreasonable demands on campus events involving certain "high-profile" speakers. "Defendants' discriminatory imposition of curfew and venue restrictions has resulted in the cancellation of two speaking engagements featuring prominent conservative speakers in the month of April, 2017," read the lawsuit filed in federal court in San Francisco.

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

U.S. says raised deep concerns with Turkey over air strikes

The United States on Tuesday expressed "deep concern" over Turkish air strikes against Kurdish fighters in Syria and Iraq and said they were not authorized by the U.S.-led coalition fighting Islamic State. The raids in Iraq's Sinjar region and northeast Syria killed at least 20 in a campaign against groups linked to the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), which has waged a three-decade insurgency against Turkey for Kurdish autonomy. Turkey is part of the U.S.-led military coalition fighting militants in Syria.

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Arkansas Executes 2 Death Row Inmates

Gov. Asa Hutchinson issued an order in February to execute eight men in 10 days in April because the state's stock of midazolam, a key lethal injection drug, expires at the end of the month.

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Tomb Full of Mummies Unearthed at Luxor

Several mummies and more than 1,000 figurines have been discovered at an ancient cemetery located at Luxor in Egypt, archaeologists reported. A team of archaeologists with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities uncovered the funerary complex during the ministry's ongoing excavations at the site. The funerary complex contains multiple tombs that were originally built for a man named Userhat, who was a judge in Luxor sometime during what modern-day archaeologists call Egypt's New Kingdom (1550–1070 B.C.) period, the ministry said in a statement.

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

With execs in hot seat, Wells Fargo gets OK for bankruptcy plan

Retail banking giant Wells Fargo has fixed problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan and will now be allowed to open new international branches, US banking regulators said Monday. A Treasury Department agency found this month found the bank's board as early as 2005 had received "regular" reports that employee firings and internal ethics complaints were related to unethical sales practices. Monday's announcement reversed an action taken by the Federal Reserve Board and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, which in December jointly found that Wells Fargo had failed to remedy problems in its 2015 bankruptcy plan.

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

U.S. F35s fly into Estonia in show of NATO solidarity

By David Mardiste AMARI AIR BASE, Estonia (Reuters) - Two of the U.S. Air Force's newest and most advanced jets landed in the Baltic state of Estonia for the first time on Tuesday, a symbolic gesture meant to reinforce the United States' commitment to the defense of NATO allies that border Russia. The visit of the F-35 stealth fighters, which flew from Britain and spent several hours in Estonia, is part of broader U.S. jet pilot training across Europe as the NATO alliance seeks to deter Moscow from any possible incursion in the Baltics. "This is a very clear message," Estonia's Defense Minister Margus Tsahkna told Reuters.

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resorted promoted on State Department website in apparent ethics violation

The US State Department has been caught promoting Donald Trump’s Florida golf club Mar-a-Lago, in another apparent ethics violation by the administration. The US Embassy in London's website, which the department is responsible for, featured an article titled “Mar a Lago: Winter White House”. It said Mr Trump “is not the first president to have access to Mar-a-Lago as a Florida retreat, but he is the first one to use it”.

Tennessee teacher planned to take 15-year-old girl to Mexico

Tennessee teacher planned to take 15-year-old girl to Mexico

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A Tennessee teacher charged with kidnapping a 15-year-old student and driving her to California had planned to take the girl to Mexico and took a boat from San Diego on a test run, according to federal court documents filed Monday.

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN

The stated objective of the Hezbollah-coordinated press tour of southern Lebanon was to see new Israeli defensive installations on the border – indications, according to the powerful Shiite Lebanese militia, of Israeli fears of Hezbollah’s growing military might. The unprecedented spectacle appeared to be a deliberate and calculated breach of a UN Security Council resolution that bans non-state forces from bearing arms in southern Lebanon, and it illustrated the unmatched sway Hezbollah wields, and the impunity it enjoys throughout the country. Recommended: Hezbollah 101: Who is the militant group, and what does it want?

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

Undergrads Share College Decision Day Strategies

After months of college application tasks and an anxious waiting period, high school seniors are starting to receive college acceptance letters. Many students may be relieved, but the hard work isn't necessarily over. Two current undergraduates recently shared their college decision strategies to help you prepare to pick a college before National College Decision Day on May 1.

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

France's Macron says 'nothing's won yet'

French presidential frontrunner Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday rejected accusations he was resting on his laurels after winning the first round of the election, insisting "nothing's won yet" in the race against the far right's Marine Le Pen. The 39-year-old centrist said his victory in Sunday's first round of voting was proof that pollsters -- who had long placed him second to Le Pen in the opening round -- "get it wrong". "Nothing's won yet," Macron said during a visit to a hospital near Paris.

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

Comcast knows you’ll pay anything for good Wi-Fi

A new survey commissioned by Comcast has ranked apartment-dweller's need for good internet, relative to other niceties like basic hygiene. The conclusion seems to be that good Wi-Fi and high-speed internet are viewed as being the most critical. Comcast probably commissioned this survey to show how relevant its brand is to millennials or something, but the only actual truth to be found is this: Comcast knows that you will put up with basically anything to get good internet, so it's going to squeeze you for every last penny. The survey polled 2015 building managers and developers in the US about what features are the most important for prospective renters. A majority (59%) had either Wi-Fi access or fast internet as the most important feature, comfortably beating out a washer-dryer in unit as the must-have. This isn't so much a statement on the value of technology as it is a stunning indictment of broadband technology in the US. In a supposedly technology-literate, competitive, first-world country, access to the internet should be a given. But thanks to the oligopoly of cable companies that control access to the internet with very little regional competition, you're often left with little or no choice of cable providers. That means that if Verizon or Comcast only choose to supply your building with a 10Mbps, you're out of luck. So really, this survey just confirms to Comcast an important fact about its customers: it doesn't matter how bad the customer service is or if it flat-out calls its customers idiots: you don't have any choice and you need internet, so pucker up, lucky consumers.

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

U.S. judge blocks Trump order to restrict funding for 'sanctuary cities'

By Dan Levine SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A U.S. judge on Tuesday blocked President Donald Trump's executive order that sought to withhold federal funds from so-called sanctuary cities, dealing another legal blow to the administration's efforts to toughen immigration enforcement. The ruling from U.S. District Judge William Orrick III in San Francisco said Trump's Jan. 25 order targeted broad categories of federal funding for sanctuary governments and that plaintiffs challenging the order were likely to succeed in proving it unconstitutional.

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

Haiti leader pleads guilty to money laundering in drug case

MIAMI (AP) — A former Haitian coup leader and recently elected senator in that country pleaded guilty Monday to a U.S. drug money-laundering charge under a deal that should allow him to avoid a potential sentence of life in prison for cocaine trafficking.

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

Turkey strikes Kurds in Iraq, Syria, drawing condemnation

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish warplanes struck suspected Kurdish rebel positions in Iraq and Syria on Tuesday, drawing condemnation from Baghdad and criticism from the U.S.-led coalition fighting the Islamic State group, which is allied with Kurdish factions in both countries.

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic

Global warming has pushed the Arctic into a new state unprecedented in human history, with thinning and retreating sea ice, skyrocketing air and sea temperatures, melting permafrost, and glaciers that are shedding ice at increasing rates.  All of these impacts and more may seem remote at first — after all, few of us live in Nunavut — but if you're a coastal resident anywhere in the world, from New York City to Dhaka, Bangladesh, what happens in the Arctic will affect you during the next several decades and beyond, primarily through sea level rise.  SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming The economic effects of all Arctic warming impacts may be enough to dent the gross domestic product of some countries, with cost estimates ranging from $7 trillion to $90 trillion by the end of this century. These are the conclusions of a new, comprehensive assessment of the Arctic climate by a division of the Arctic Council — a cooperative, governing body that helps oversee development in the Far North.  Sea ice (TOP) meets land as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft above Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesThe scientific report, released on Tuesday, is known as Snow, Water, Ice, and Permafrost in the Arctic, or SWIPA. About 90 scientists helped produce the report, while more than two-dozen experts peer-reviewed the results.  The document contains two key findings that anyone concerned about the future of not just the Arctic, but the entire globe, should take note of.  The first is that the Arctic Ocean could be free of summer sea ice starting as early as the late 2030s, which is earlier than other estimates have shown. The second is that rapid Arctic warming is driving greater melting of land ice in the region, which led scientists to conclude that consensus projections of global sea level rise made in 2013 are too conservative. Compared to the previous SWIPA report, which was produced in 2011, the new assessment paints a far more dire picture of an Arctic climate in overdrive.  It also offers hope that action can be taken now to slow down and eventually stabilize Arctic warming after about the year 2050. But time is running out. Even with rapid action to curb global warming pollutants like carbon dioxide and methane, the Arctic most of us grew up with — featuring thick sea ice making the region virtually impenetrable year-round — is gone, and is not likely to return anytime in the next century.  Sea ice thickness trends, showing the thinning trend in recent years.Image: zack labe"... The Arctic of today is different in many respects from the Arctic of the past century, or even the Arctic of 20 years ago," the report states. "Many of the changes underway are due to a simple fact: Ice, snow, and frozen ground — the components of the Arctic cryosphere — are sensitive to heat."  Based on computer model projections, the report states that average fall and winter temperatures in the Arctic will increase up to 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, above late 20th century values by the middle of the century, even if relatively stringent greenhouse gas emissions cuts are made.  Such temperature thresholds are already being reached in some months, with January 2016 recording a temperature anomaly of 9 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981-2010 average for the region, with even higher anomalies seen during October through February of the same year.  This past winter was the warmest on record for the Arctic, and for the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter. This has left sea ice in a precariously thin and sparse state as the upcoming melt season nears.  The report contains valuable findings on what would happen to Arctic climate change if the world were to come close to meeting the goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement. That treaty, which went into force in November 2016, aims to keep global warming to well under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through the year 2100.  It's unclear whether the agreement's goals are still feasible, considering that the U.S. — the world's second-largest emitter — is considering pulling out of it altogether, and other nations have yet to offer plans to cut their emissions in line with the temperature target.  A "drunken forest" in Fairbanks Alaska where trees are collapsing into the ground due to permafrost melt.Image: Warming Images/REX/ShutterstockMeeting the Paris targets would help slow the pace and reduce the severity of Arctic warming, but it "would not stabilize the loss of Arctic glaciers, ice sheets, and ice caps," the report states.  "The recent SWIPA assessment tells that the changes in the Arctic are bound to continue at the current rate until mid-century," said Morten Skovgaard Olsen, who chaired the new report, in an email.  "But it also tells that immediate and ambitious green-house gas reductions will slow the speed of changes beyond mid-century and even stabilize change beyond mid century, preventing major further impacts associated with the Arctic melt .” Any carbon pollution cuts made now will have the most significant influence on what the Arctic will look like after about 2050, the report's authors said at a press conference Tuesday in Virginia.  “The changes are cumulative, and so what we do in the next 5 years is really important on slowing down the changes that will happen in the next 30 or 40 years," said James Overland, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  "The emphasis on action and immediacy is one of the main findings” from the report, he said.  NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice near Pituffik, Greenland.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesForeign ministers from the eight Arctic nations will meet in Fairbanks, Alaska on May 11 to discuss these findings and other issues pertaining to the region. Some discussion on the Paris agreement may take place, particularly along the sidelines of the talks. According to the SWIPA report, meltwater from Arctic glaciers has contributed 35 percent of current sea level rise, with the greatest contribution coming from Greenland.  The planet's largest island lost an average of 375 gigatons of ice per year. This is equivalent to losing a block of ice measuring 4.6 miles on all sides, from 2011 to 2014 alone. It amounts to twice the melt rate from 2003 to 2008. In addition, thawing permafrost is harming infrastructure from Alaska to Siberia, with landslides and mysterious craters swallowing parts of the Russian Arctic.  In Alaska, the report found that wildfires in taiga forests are worse now than at any time in the past 10,000 years, due to hotter, drier summers and earlier spring snowmelt. WATCH: Stunning drone footage captures rare video of blue whales feeding

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

US Supreme Court opts to leave CIA 'torture report' secret

The US Supreme Court on Monday turned back an appeal by rights groups seeking to make public a damning report on the CIA's post-September 11 torture program, ensuring it will remain secret. The court rebuffed arguments from the American Civil Liberties Union that the highly classified report, compiled in 2014 by the Senate Intelligence Committee, should be released based on US government transparency rules. "We are disappointed by this major setback for government transparency and accountability.

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

U.S. slams South Sudan's Kiir over 'man-made' famine, urges truce

By Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United States slammed South Sudan's President Salva Kiir on Tuesday for the African state's "man-made" famine and ongoing conflict, urging him to fulfill a month-old pledge of a unilateral truce by ordering his troops back to their barracks. "We must see a sign that progress is possible," U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley told a United Nations Security Council briefing on South Sudan. "We must see that ceasefire implemented." South Sudan descended into civil war in 2013 after Kiir fired his deputy, unleashing a conflict that has spawned armed factions often following ethnic lines.

20 Ways To Save Money

20 Ways To Save Money

Some are tougher to achieve than others, and you'll need to weigh the necessary sacrifice against the return.

Behold: This Galaxy Note 8 blows the Galaxy S8 out of the water

Behold: This Galaxy Note 8 blows the Galaxy S8 out of the water

Samsung's Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ were finally released this past Friday, and it seems like the phones are already well on their way to becoming a smash hit. The South Korean electronics giant announced Monday morning that combined Galaxy S8 and S8+ pre-orders out-sold Samsung's previous-generation Galaxy S7 and S7 edge by 30%. As a quick reminder, the S7 and S7 edge were Samsung's best-selling phones ever. If you picked up a new Galaxy S8 on Friday or over the weekend, rest assured that you now hold the most stunning smartphones that have ever existed. They're also two of the most powerful smartphones that have ever existed. In fact, there's almost nothing on Earth that could possibly give you buyer's remorse. Almost nothing... When an early adopter buys a new flagship iPhone, he or she knows that there will be a full year to wait (and save up money) before an even better new flagship iPhone launches. In Samsung's case, however, there's a much shorter buffer in between flagship releases. In the first half of each year, Samsung updates its Galaxy S lineup. The Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ are the company's flagship smartphones for the first half of 2017 and as you read in our Galaxy S8 review, they're incredible. Then, in the second half of 2017, Samsung will update its Note line with the all-new Galaxy Note 8. If the Note 8 looks anything like this, Galaxy S8 and S8+ owners should prepare to be very, very jealous. Graphic designer Muhsin M. Belaal Auckburaully teamed up with YouTube channel DBS Designing to completely reimagine Samsung's Galaxy Note series using design cues from the Galaxy S8 along with rumors we've heard so far. The results, as you can see, are absolutely stunning. Unlike most concept smartphones we see out there, this Galaxy Note 8 is actually rooted in reality. It likely doesn't look exactly like the Note 8 Samsung will release later this year, but we're willing to bet that it's close. Hopefully Samsung sticks with the precedent set by the Galaxy S8, however, and ditches that distracting logo from the front of the phone. As for specs, Auckburaully stays well within the realm of reality by sticking with the rumors we've heard so far. The Note 8 should feature a huge 6.4-inch QHD+ display and a screen-to-body ratio that's even better than the 83% ratio on the Galaxy S8. Other expected specs include 6GB of RAM, 64GB or 128GB of storage, microSDXC support, a new dual-lens rear camera setup, an iris scanner, and a huge 4,000 mAh battery that hopefully doesn't explode. More images of Auckburaully's Galaxy Note 8 design can be seen on his Behance page, and a video featuring the design is embedded below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0p3CAs9ZP0

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

The Ford Mustang races to the top spot

Less than two years after officially launching its Pony Car beyond its domestic US borders, the Ford Mustang is the world's best-selling sportscar. In all, Ford sold 150,000 Mustangs around the world in 2016 which, according to the latest industry data from IHS Markit, means the car is not only America's most popular sportscar, it has now conquered the world, too, despite some hard-hitting European and Japanese competition. The Mustang has outsold the Mazda MX-5 Miata, BMW 4 Series, Nissan 370Z and the venerable Porsche 911 among others to claim the top spot, leaving many to ponder why it took Ford so long -- 51 years -- to finally offer its most famous muscle car to European and Asian customers.

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

Brazil police arrest 12 men suspected of stealing millions

SAO PAULO (AP) — Twelve men suspected of taking part in a dramatic, multimillion-dollar theft from an armored car company in a Paraguayan border city have been arrested in Brazil, officials in the Brazilian Federal Police said Tuesday.

Iran nuclear deal under review as uncertainty grows

Iran nuclear deal under review as uncertainty grows

Iran and major powers met Tuesday in Vienna to review adherence to their 2015 nuclear deal as uncertainty grows about the landmark accord's future under US President Donald Trump. The regular quarterly meeting heard, as Washington confirmed last week, that Iran is sticking to its side of the deal with the United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany, diplomats said. The accord saw Tehran drastically curb its nuclear activities in order to ease concerns that Iran wanted to build an atomic bomb.

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

How to Know If You're Underfunded in Your Retirement Account

Reports of American workers being short on their retirement funds are rampant. The National Institute on Retirement Security frames the "underfunded" issue in real dollar terms, noting that retirement savings are "dangerously low", and the U.S. retirement savings deficit is between $6.8 and $14 trillion. Yes, too many Americans are underfunded in the retirement accounts -- but how do you know exactly how much you're underfunded?

Scots don't want another independence vote: Kantar poll

Scots don't want another independence vote: Kantar poll

Most Scottish voters do not want another referendum on independence from the United Kingdom and support for secession itself appears to have weakened, according to a Kantar survey. Scots voted by a wide margin to stick with the European Union in last June's referendum, clashing with the UK as a whole which voted to leave. Scotland's devolved government, run by the Scottish National Party (SNP), says this means the country should be given a new chance to decide whether it wants to split from the UK.