elections

French economy minister to resign on Tuesday

French economy minister to resign on Tuesday

France's Economy Minister Emmanuel Macron is set to resign on Tuesday, a source close to the former investment banker said, taking one of the country's most popular politicians a big step closer to launching a run for the presidency next year. The source close to 38-year-old Macron confirmed local media reports announcing his resignation as imminent, after months of speculation about the outspoken former investment banker's loyalty to President Francois Hollande. Macron's office was not immediately available for comment on the reports, which appeared in an editorial in Les Echos newspaper and on BFM TV.

Trump hovers over McCain, Rubio U.S. Senate re-election contests

Trump hovers over McCain, Rubio U.S. Senate re-election contests

By Richard Cowan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Republican voters in Arizona and Florida are expected to pick Senators John McCain and Marco Rubio as their respective U.S. Senate nominees when they go to the polls on Tuesday, but one name not on either ballot, Donald Trump, looms large. The Republican presidential nominee has endorsed both McCain and Rubio in their re-election bids even though he has rocky relations with both senators. Trump offended McCain and many other Republicans last year by suggesting that the maverick senator and party's 2008 presidential nominee was anything but a war hero because he was captured during the Vietnam War after his airplane was shot down during a bombing mission.

Britain seeks to reaffirm Calais migrant deal to keep thousands in France

Britain seeks to reaffirm Calais migrant deal to keep thousands in France

LONDON/PARIS (Reuters) - Britain's new interior minister, Amber Rudd, will meet her French counterpart in Paris on Tuesday to reaffirm the deal which allows Britain to make border checks in Calais and keep thousands of migrants and asylum seekers in France. The meeting comes days after French presidential contender Nicolas Sarkozy said Britain should deal on its own territory with migrants camped in the northern town, joining similar calls by Alain Juppe, also a conservative presidential candidate.

FBI detects breaches against two state voter systems

FBI detects breaches against two state voter systems

By Dustin Volz and Jim Finkle WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Federal Bureau of Investigation has found breaches in Illinois and Arizona's voter registration databases and is urging states to increase computer security ahead of the Nov. 8 presidential election, according to a U.S. official familiar with the probe. The FBI warning in an Aug. 18 flash alert from the agency's Cyber Division did not identify the intruders or the two states targeted. Officials and cyber security experts say recent breaches at the Democratic National Committee and elsewhere in the Democratic Party were likely carried out by people within the Russian government.

Factbox: Early voting starts next month in U.S. election

By Ginger Gibson WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Although the Nov. 8 U.S. presidential election is more than two months away, the first ballots will be cast in just a few weeks when several states begin early voting. Thirty-eight of the 50 U.S. states have some form of early voting in this year's race between Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump. Pushing supporters to vote early has become a large organizational effort by both major U.S. parties. Below are the dates for early voting in the states that allow it. ...

Republicans ask Clinton Foundation to produce correspondence

Republicans ask Clinton Foundation to produce correspondence

The Republican National Committee asked the charity of Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's family on Monday to produce all correspondence its staff had with the U.S. State Department while Clinton served as America's most senior diplomat. Clinton's campaign to win the Nov. 8 presidential election has been dogged by criticism that donors to the Clinton Foundation may have expected special favors from the U.S. government in return. "The Clinton Foundation can play a vital role in filling important gaps in the public record by demonstrating its commitment to transparency and making public all correspondence its officials had with the State Department during Secretary Clinton's tenure," Reince Priebus, the RNC chairman, said in a letter to the foundation's president, Donna Shalala.

Clinton aide Abedin leaves husband Weiner after sexting report

Clinton aide Abedin leaves husband Weiner after sexting report

By Amanda Becker WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Huma Abedin, one of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's top aides, said on Monday that she was separating from her husband, Anthony Weiner, after a sex scandal similar to an earlier incident that led him to resign from the U.S. Congress. "After long and painful consideration and work on my marriage, I have made the decision to separate from my husband," Huma Abedin said in a statement.  "Anthony and I remain devoted to doing what is best for our son, who is the light of our life. During this difficult time, I ask for respect for our privacy," Abedin added.

U.S. Senate's Reid, in last round, jabs outside money in Nevada succession fight

U.S. Senate's Reid, in last round, jabs outside money in Nevada succession fight

By David Morgan LAS VEGAS (Reuters) - Outside political money is pouring into a race in Nevada to replace U.S. Democratic Senator Harry Reid, who is retiring and who told Reuters that the main reason his favored successor isn't winning easily is cash from beyond the state's borders. In a race that underscores the rise of outside money in U.S. campaign finance, as well as a key demographic challenge facing the Republican Party, Catherine Cortez Masto and Joe Heck are in a dead heat to replace the Senate's No. 1 Democrat. Democrat Cortez Masto, 52, was a two-term Nevada attorney general.

Bosnian Serbs make shoes for Melania Trump's White House march

Bosnian Serbs make shoes for Melania Trump's White House march

By Gordana Katana BANJA LUKA, Bosnia (Reuters) - A Bosnian Serb factory on Monday presented two pairs of shoes as a gift for the wife of U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, Slovenian-born Melania, in a gesture of support for Trump's White House campaign. Many Serbs in the Balkans back Trump, ill-disposed to rival Hillary Clinton whose husband Bill backed NATO air strikes on Bosnian Serb positions toward the end of the 1992-95 Bosnian war.

Gabon opposition candidate calls on President Bongo to 'acknowledge his defeat'

Gabon opposition candidate calls on President Bongo to 'acknowledge his defeat'

LIBREVILLE (Reuters) - Gabon opposition candidate Jean Ping on Monday called on President Ali Bongo to "acknowledge his defeat" in a weekend presidential election, telling reporters in the capital Libreville that unofficial tallies give him a clear edge. The Central African oil producer's interior minister called Ping's move to pre-empt an official announcement of the poll results, which is expected on Tuesday, by declaring victory on Sunday an attempt to manipulate the democratic process. (Reporting By Gerauds Wilfried Obangome; Writing by Aaron Ross; Editing by Joe Bavier and Toby Chopra)

Kremlin expresses deep regret over illness of Uzbek president

The Kremlin said on Monday it deeply regrets the illness of Uzbek President Islam Karimov who suffered a brain hemorrhage on Saturday. The Kremlin declined to comment on whether it was concerned by a possible aggravation of the situation in Central Asia's most populous country which borders Afghanistan, in the event of Karimov's death. "Such formulation of the question is inappropriate and I repeat once again: the Kremlin wishes a quick recovery to the president of Uzbekistan," Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told a conference call with journalists.

Far-right candidate ahead in polls to win Austrian presidency

Far-right candidate ahead in polls to win Austrian presidency

The far right is ahead in Austria's presidential race, according to opinion polls which predict a win for the anti-immigration candidate that would be a watershed for populists across Europe who have capitalized on the migration crisis. Ahead of the Oct. 2 election, the Freedom Party's (FPO) Norbert Hofer is just ahead of his independent rival, Alexander Van der Bellen, who narrowly beat Hofer in a previous run-off vote in May that was annulled. A poll of 600 people published by the Oesterreich tabloid showed the average support for Hofer at 53 percent, one point higher than a poll in late July, versus 47 percent for former Greens head Alexander Van der Bellen.

Trump to give speech on illegal immigration on Wednesday

Trump to give speech on illegal immigration on Wednesday

U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump tweeted on Sunday night that he would make a major speech on illegal immigration in Arizona on Wednesday. The announcement came a day after Trump said he would crack down on illegal immigrants who overstay their visas, as he sought to clarify his views on how to overhaul the U.S. immigration system. Last week, Trump had said he was "softening" on his plan to deport all 11 million illegal immigrants.

Gabon leader and top rival both claim presidential victory, allege fraud

Gabon leader and top rival both claim presidential victory, allege fraud

By Gerauds Wilfried Obangome LIBREVILLE (Reuters) - Supporters of Gabon's President Ali Bongo and his chief rival both said on Sunday they were set to win a presidential election that poses the most serious challenge yet to the Bongo family's half-century rule in the tiny, oil-rich nation. Backers of the president and his main challenger, Jean Ping, also traded accusations of fraud allegedly committed during Saturday's vote, raising the prospect of increased tension in the wake of an uncharacteristically bitter campaign. At a large gathering of supporters at his campaign headquarters in the capital, Ping, 73, distributed figures showing him handily beating Bongo.

Bongo aims to extend 50-year family rule in Gabon election

Bongo aims to extend 50-year family rule in Gabon election

By Gerauds Wilfried Obangome LIBREVILLE (Reuters) - Gabon voted on Saturday amid discontent over its failure to raise living standards despite oil wealth, in a poll posing the biggest challenge yet to President Ali Bongo, whose family has run the central African nation for half a century. With state machinery and entrenched patronage networks behind him, Bongo, 57, is likely to be returned, seven years after winning his first election following the death of his father Omar, who ruled for 42 years. Bongo faced nine other candidates - compared with 22 in the last poll - but his main rival was veteran diplomat Jean Ping.

Democrat Clinton receives first security briefing

Democrat Clinton receives first security briefing

(Reuters) - Democrat Hillary Clinton on Saturday received her first national security briefing since accepting her party's nomination for the presidency last month. Clinton, a former secretary of state, attended the meeting alone, according to a pool report. The meeting was held at the Federal Bureau of Investigation's field office in White Plains, New York, not far from the Chappaqua, New York, residence she shares with her husband, former President Bill Clinton. It lasted a little over two hours. ...

Trump vows crackdown on immigrants who overstay visas if elected

Trump vows crackdown on immigrants who overstay visas if elected

By Steve Holland DES MOINES, Iowa (Reuters) - U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump offered fresh details of how he would tackle illegal immigration on Saturday, saying he would crack down on those who overstay their visas as he sought to quiet criticism from conservatives. In a campaign speech in Des Moines, Iowa, Trump also cited the shooting death of a cousin of NBA star Dwyane Wade to urge African-American voters to rally behind him, calling it an example of violence that has to be addressed. Trump, speaking on the Iowa State Fairgrounds with hay bales stacked behind him, sought to clarify his views on how to overhaul the U.S. immigration system after saying earlier in the week that he was softening on his plan to deport all 11 million illegal immigrants.

Juppe pitches 'united France' in presidential bid launch

Juppe pitches 'united France' in presidential bid launch

By Ingrid Melander CHATOU, France (Reuters) - Alain Juppe kicked off his campaign to be the conservative candidate in France's presidential election on Saturday by pledging deep reforms "without exploiting fears", seeking to differentiate himself from hardline rival Nicolas Sarkozy. Over the past week, ex-president Sarkozy grabbed the headlines in France with the launch of his primary campaign on a tough law-and-order platform including warnings that France's identity is "at threat" from immigration. "France, more than ever, needs to be united, because it is in a state of shock." If elected he would be tough on crime and build more prison space but "never accept a French Guantanamo," Juppe said, referring to the U.S. prison for terrorism suspects, and to plans by some of his primary rivals to lock up all those who are under the surveillance of intelligence services.

Clinton leads Trump by 5 points in Reuters/Ipsos poll

Clinton leads Trump by 5 points in Reuters/Ipsos poll

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton leads her Republican rival Donald Trump by 5 percentage points among likely voters, down from a peak this month of 12 points, according to the Reuters/Ipsos daily tracking poll released on Friday. The Aug. 22-25 opinion poll found that 41 percent of likely voters supported Clinton ahead of the Nov. 8 presidential election, while 36 percent supported Trump. Clinton, a former secretary of state, has led real estate developer Trump in the poll since Democrats and Republicans ended their national conventions and formally nominated their presidential candidates in July.

Clinton attacks Trump's outreach to black voters in new ad

Clinton attacks Trump's outreach to black voters in new ad

By Emily Stephenson WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Democrat Hillary Clinton called on Friday for voters to reject the "bigotry" of Donald Trump's White House campaign, releasing a television ad criticizing his efforts to appeal to black voters and saying she was reaching out to people from all parties who are troubled by his candidacy. The ad shows video of Trump's controversial pitch to black voters, in which the Republican candidate urges them to support him by asking, "What do you have to lose?" It also shows headlines about a racial discrimination lawsuit the New York real estate mogul faced in the 1970s. Clinton's presidential campaign said the ad, released a day after she gave a speech accusing Trump of fueling America's "radical fringe," would air in the hotly contested states of Florida, North Carolina, Ohio and Pennsylvania.

As racial politics loom over election, Obama's legacy is seen as mixed

As racial politics loom over election, Obama's legacy is seen as mixed

By Jeff Mason WASHINGTON (Reuters) - When Barack Obama became the first African-American to win the White House in 2008, his victory was a turning point in U.S. race relations that set high expectations for progress to come. Nearly eight years later, with Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton attacking each other over racial politics, the legacy of Obama's presidency looks decidedly mixed, black leaders said. Having a black president, two attorneys general and a chief of homeland security did not result in basic fairness for victims of racially charged violence, said Cornel West, an academic and former Obama supporter who has become a high-profile critic of the Democratic president.

Hillary Clinton says her family's foundation is looking for partners

Hillary Clinton says her family's foundation is looking for partners

U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton said on Friday the Clinton Foundation was seeking other organizations to partner with as it looks to wind down some of its charitable work, but defended her work as secretary of state as independent from her family's foundation. Clinton has come under fire in recent days amid questions over the charity and its donors given her role heading the State Department from 2009 to early 2013. Critics have accused her of running a "pay-for-play" operation, a charge she and the foundation have denied.

Sarkozy tells comeback rally he would ban burkini across France

By Ingrid Melander CHATEAURENARD, France (Reuters) - Nicolas Sarkozy said on Thursday he would impose a nationwide ban on burkinis if elected back to the presidency in 2017, positioning himself as a strong defender of French values and tough on immigration. Hundreds of supporters waving French flags chanted "Nicolas! Nicolas!" and applauded as Sarkozy, a conservative president from 2007 to 2012 before losing an election to Socialist Francois Hollande, promised to protect the French people. "I will be the president that re-establishes the authority of the state," Sarkozy told a crowd of more than 2,000 packing a sports hall in Chateaurenard, a Provence town where his Les Republicains beat the far-right Front National (FN) in regional elections last year.

Judge orders search of new Clinton emails for release by September 13

Judge orders search of new Clinton emails for release by September 13

(Reuters) - A U.S. judge ordered the State Department on Thursday to release by Sept. 13 any emails it finds between Hillary Clinton and the White House from the week of the 2012 attack in Benghazi, Libya, among the thousands of additional emails uncovered by federal investigators. The order came after the Federal Bureau of Investigation gave the department a disc earlier this month containing 14,900 emails to and from Clinton and other documents it said it had recovered that she did not return to the government. Clinton, the Democratic presidential nominee, has been criticized for using an unauthorized private email system run from a server in the basement of her home while she was secretary of state from 2009 to 2013, a decision she says was wrong and that she regrets.

White House meets with Clinton, Trump teams to discuss transition

White House meets with Clinton, Trump teams to discuss transition

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Top White House officials met on Thursday with Democratic and Republican presidential campaign representatives to discuss preparations for transferring power to whomever wins the Nov. 8 election, a White House spokeswoman said. The meeting was led by Denis McDonough, President Barack Obama's chief of staff, and included Ken Salazar, the former Interior Secretary who is leading the transition team for Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton, and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, who is the transition chair for Republican candidate Donald Trump, the White House said. ...

Clinton, Trump clash over who is best for U.S. minorities

Clinton, Trump clash over who is best for U.S. minorities

By Amanda Becker and Steve Holland RENO, Nev./MANCHESTER, N.H. (Reuters) - Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton accused Donald Trump on Thursday of fuelling America's "radical fringe" with racist rhetoric, even as her Republican rival sought to soften his image with an appeal to minorities. Clinton needs to retain support from black and Latino voters to win the Nov. 8 election, the same coalition that helped propel Democrat Barack Obama to the White House in 2008. Trump, whose support comes mainly from whites, is unlikely to be victorious unless he can cut into that support.

Hispanic coalition asks Trump to stop 'attacks'

Hispanic coalition asks Trump to stop 'attacks'

NEW YORK (Reuters) - The National Hispanic Leadership Agenda on Thursday asked Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump to stop attacks on Hispanic communities, inviting him in a letter to meet with the group's leadership. "As we have expressed numerous times, your rhetoric of relentless attacks against our community is an issue of serious concern and has had a significant impact, fueling an alarming trend in our nation," the group, a coalition of 40 Latino nonpartisan advocacy organizations, wrote to Trump. ...

Clinton ramps up Asian outreach in three closely fought states

Clinton ramps up Asian outreach in three closely fought states

By Luciana Lopez NEW YORK (Reuters) - Democrat Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign is focusing an effort to win over Asian American voters on three states where it believes the small but rapidly growing group could make the difference in her race against Republican Donald Trump. The push in closely fought Nevada, Virginia and Pennsylvania follows a broader national effort by Clinton's campaign to court minorities who are critical to her chances of winning the White House in the Nov. 8 election. “Secretary Clinton understands the importance of the AAPI community and has launched a program that reflects that, reaching AAPI voters in unprecedented ways,” said Jason Tengco, the Clinton campaign’s outreach director for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI).

Chorus grows for Clintons to shutter charitable foundation

Chorus grows for Clintons to shutter charitable foundation

The Clinton Foundation, the family philanthropy of Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, should shut down or transfer operations to another charity despite its good work to avoid perceptions of "pay-for-play," The Washington Post and USA Today said in editorials on Wednesday. Despite plans announced earlier this week to reorganize the Clinton Foundation if Hillary Clinton wins the Nov. 8 election, USA Today said the global charity must close for the Democratic candidate to avoid any appearance of unethical ties. "The only way to eliminate the odor surrounding the foundation is to wind it down and put it in mothballs, starting today, and transfer its important charitable work to another large American charity such as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation," the paper's editorial board wrote.

Democrat Clinton vows to support Colombia-FARC peace deal

Democrat Clinton vows to support Colombia-FARC peace deal

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton praised the peace deal between Colombia and the rebel group FARC in a statement on Thursday. "As president, I'll ensure that the United States remains their partner in that process. The people of Colombia deserve nothing less," Clinton said. "And the safety and security of our hemisphere and world will be strengthened by Colombia's success." (Reporting by Ginger Gibson; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama)

us

FBI detects breaches against two state voter systems

FBI detects breaches against two state voter systems

By Dustin Volz and Jim Finkle WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Federal Bureau of Investigation has found breaches in Illinois and Arizona's voter registration databases and is urging states to increase computer security ahead of the Nov. 8 presidential election, according to a U.S. official familiar with the probe. The FBI warning in an Aug. 18 flash alert from the agency's Cyber Division did not identify the intruders or the two states targeted. Officials and cyber security experts say recent breaches at the Democratic National Committee and elsewhere in the Democratic Party were likely carried out by people within the Russian government.

California lawmakers pass rape bill inspired by Stanford case

California lawmakers pass rape bill inspired by Stanford case

By Dan Whitcomb LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - California lawmakers, responding to outrage over the six-month jail term given to a former Stanford University swimmer after his conviction for sexually assaulting an unconscious woman, passed legislation on Monday closing a loophole that allowed the sentence. The bill now goes to Democratic Governor Jerry Brown for his approval. The measure was introduced in response to the sentence given to 20-year-old Brock Turner by Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky in June, which was widely condemned as too lenient.

Parole system questioned after murder of NBA star's cousin

Parole system questioned after murder of NBA star's cousin

A visibly angry Eddie Johnson, the city's police superintendent, said the case underscored the need to keep violent criminals behind bars longer. "This reprehensible act of violence is an example of why we need to change the way we treat habitual offenders in the city of Chicago," Johnson said on Sunday. On Monday, Mayor Rahm Emanuel weighed in, saying, "We keep coming upon the same facts: repeat gun offenders who continually run in and out of the criminal justice system with no consequences, who are back on the streets wreaking havoc," according to the Chicago Tribune.

In bid against corruption, Greece to ax TV licenses

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Greece's left-wing government launched an auction Tuesday for four private national television licenses, reducing the number from seven after a heated public debate on corruption in the financially troubled country.

Iowa at center of debate over 'shadow insurance' deals

Iowa at center of debate over 'shadow insurance' deals

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — For cash-strapped life insurance companies, the deal sounds almost too good to be true: A state law allows them to create complex financial instruments to transfer liabilities to new subsidiaries, instantly wiping huge debts off their balance sheets.

North Carolina warily watching 2 tropical weather systems

North Carolina warily watching 2 tropical weather systems

BUXTON, N.C. (AP) — A tropical weather system off the coast of North Carolina's Outer Banks is expected to strengthen in the next day, bringing winds up to 45 mph and heavy rains that could flood low-lying areas, officials said.

The Latest: Apple says EU ruling ignores international law

The Latest: Apple says EU ruling ignores international law

Apple has derided the European Union’s ruling that it must pay up to 13 billion euros ($14.5 billion) in back taxes to Ireland. It added: “The commission’s case is not about how much Apple pays in taxes, it’s about which government collects the money. Ireland’s tax collection agency, the Revenue Commissioners, insists that Apple hasn’t dodged a penny of lawfully calculated tax in Ireland.

40 Virginia cases of Hepatitis A now linked to smoothies

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia health officials say there are now 40 confirmed cases of Hepatitis A that are connected to frozen strawberries used at Tropical Smoothie Cafe locations across the state, up from 28 cases less than a week ago.

education

What do adult students want from college?

Each year, legions of adult learners – that is, students who are 25 years old or older – take a first or second chance at higher education. On Monday, Washington Monthly released the first-ever list of best colleges for adult learners. More than 40 percent of Americans enrolled in colleges are adult learners.

3 Questions for High School Teachers to Ask Before Ditching Homework

A Texas teacher's no-homework policy went viral this month after a parent shared the news on Facebook. Brandy Young teaches second grade at Godley Elementary School in Texas, but some high school teachers may be wondering if it makes sense to stop assigning homework to their teenage students. Ramy Mahmoud, a science teacher at Williams High School in Plano, Texas, says simply appeasing parents because of pushback may not be the best idea, but teachers who want to change their homework policy to increase equity among students are on the right track.

For-profit college banned from taking students with federal aid

ITT Technical Institute, a for-profit chain of colleges with more 40,000 students, was dealt a severe blow from the US government on Thursday. Officials from the US Department of Education announced that the vocational institute could no longer enroll students that had access to federal financial aid. ITT, which depends on such students for a large portion of its revenue, has been under investigation for months for its accounting and recruiting practices.

Partial win in fight over North Carolina transgender bathroom law

Partial win in fight over North Carolina transgender bathroom law

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (Reuters) - North Carolina's university system must allow two transgender students and a transgender employee to use bathrooms matching their gender identity, a U.S. judge ruled on Friday, in a partial victory for those fighting the state's restrictive restroom law. Most transgender people in North Carolina, however, will still be bound by the law adopted in March that requires them to use bathrooms in government buildings and public schools that correspond with the sex on their birth certificate. Bathroom access has become a flashpoint in the battle over transgender rights in the United States.

Relief granted to transgender students fighting North Carolina's bathroom law

Relief granted to transgender students fighting North Carolina's bathroom law

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (Reuters) - A U.S. judge on Friday blocked the University of North Carolina from enforcing a state law requiring transgender people to use single-sex restrooms and locker rooms that correspond to the gender on their birth certificate. U.S. District Court Judge Thomas Schroeder's order granting a preliminary injunction applies only to the three transgender plaintiffs named in a lawsuit challenging the measure, known as House Bill 2 or HB 2. North Carolina in March became the first U.S. state to bar people from using restrooms in government buildings and public schools consistent with their gender identity.

Yes, Students Do Learn More From Attractive Teachers

How to help students do better in school? Extra credit if you intuited that teacher attractiveness had other effects as well. More surprising: The researchers don’t think that sexual interest explains the results, which held up whether the teacher and students were of the same sex or not.

Mexico announces plans to fire 1,255 striking teachers

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Education officials in Mexico have announced plans to fire 1,255 teachers and school employees in two states who allegedly joined protests that blocked roads and shuttered schools in the southern states of Oaxaca and Guerrero.

Nobody Wins When Colleges Hire Too Many Part-Time Professors

Nobody Wins When Colleges Hire Too Many Part-Time Professors

Three years ago, when Megan Debin was an adjunct art history professor in Los Angeles, she taught four classes at four campuses—but the toughest challenge she faced wasn’t the three or four hours a day she spent navigating gridlock to get to class.

Correction: Students Pepper-Sprayed story

ATLANTA (AP) — In a story Aug. 24 about a parent arrested for pepper-spraying students at a school, The Associated Press erroneously reported that Atlanta Public Schools spokeswoman Kimberly Willis Green said the incident happened during a fight and the woman was trying to stop her son from being jumped. Green tells the AP she never said that.

Behind legal furor over transgender policy, schools wonder what to do

When a federal judge blocked the Obama administration’s guidelines for transgender rights in public schools this week, he stopped schools from having to follow them – at least for the time being. Courts will decide if public schools will have to allow transgender students to use the bathroom of their choice – as President Obama claims federal law demands – or if the injunction against his guidelines will stand. Recommended: How much do you know about gay rights in America?

Complaint: Black students punished more harshly than whites

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Black students and students with disabilities attending public schools in Virginia's capital city are more severely and more frequently punished than their classmates, according to a complaint filed Wednesday with the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights.

How Teachers Are Bringing Financial Literacy Lessons to the Classroom

"When kids know how money works, they are more careful with their spending and take better care of their things that cost money," says Kristi Ekern, a fifth-grade teacher in the Denver metro area. "Children tell me they speak in the evenings with their parents, and parents are listening to the kids when they're evaluating investments," says Neme Alperstein, who recently retired from teaching the fifth grade in Queens, New York. During her 28 years of teaching, she used a program called the Stock Market Game, a virtual investing platform provided by the SIFMA Foundation, to teach students about investing by creating a hypothetical investment portfolio and following real stocks.

Schools Are More Diverse, but America’s Teachers Probably Won’t Be

Schools Are More Diverse, but America’s Teachers Probably Won’t Be

In the darkest days of racial segregation, it used to be said that a professionally dressed, well-respected African American strolling through the neighborhood wearing a suit and tie, or a dress with pearls, must be a doctor—or a teacher. At a time when blacks and Latinos make up the majority of America’s public school students, however, a new study produced by Brookings’ Brown Center on Education Policy shows teachers of color are vanishing from the nation’s classrooms at an alarming rate, with surprisingly few college students willing to replace them. “Making serious progress toward a teacher workforce which is as diverse as the students it serves will require exceptionally ambitious patches” to fix the brain drain, according to the study, titled High Hopes and Harsh Realities: The Real Challenge to Building a Diverse Workforce.

Why Trump Is Failing With College Grads

The support of white voters with a college education is the key battle of the 2016 presidential contest, and Donald Trump is losing it. In 2012 Mitt Romney beat Barack Obama by 14 points among college-educated whites, according to exit polls. The average of top national surveys shows Mr. Trump trailing Hillary Clinton among these voters by nine points, and the latest Pew Research Center survey gives Mrs. Clinton a 14-point edge.

Graduate students at private colleges can unionize: U.S. labor board

In a 3-1 vote, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) said that graduate students working as academic assistants are employees who get organizing rights under federal labor law. The NLRB's decision allows Columbia University research and teaching assistants to vote on whether they want to join a United Auto Workers affiliate.

Labor board says graduate students can unionize

Graduate students working as teaching assistants at private universities may unionize following a much-discussed ruling in their favor. The National Labor Relations Board decided Tuesday on a case from Columbia University graduate students who said their status as employees required the right to collective bargaining with the university, The Wall Street Journal reported. Both the cost and economic necessity of higher education and even graduate work have risen in recent years, giving private universities with sought-after names and reputations increasing power.

Texas, four other states sue over U.S. transgender health policy

Texas, four other states sue over U.S. transgender health policy

Texas and four other states sued the Obama administration on Tuesday over extending its healthcare nondiscrimination law to transgender individuals, saying the move "represents a radical invasion of the federal bureaucracy into a doctor’s medical judgment." Texas, along with Wisconsin, Nebraska, Kentucky and Kansas sued on behalf three medical organizations, two of which are affiliated with Christian groups. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, named as a defendant in the suit, was not immediately available for comment. On Sunday, a judge for the same district blocked an Obama administration policy that public schools should allow transgender students to use the bathrooms of their choice, granting a nationwide injunction sought by 13 states, led by Texas.

Graduate Students Can Unionize at Private Colleges, U.S. Labor Panel Rules

A federal labor board ruled that graduate students who teach at private universities are employees with full rights to join unions, a sweeping decision that paves the way for student unionization on campuses nationwide. In a 3-1 decision announced Tuesday, the National Labor Relations Board said a group of Columbia University students who sought to join a union deserved employee protections when they get paid for work at the direction of the school. The victory for the Columbia students could deliver tens of thousands of new members to the nation’s beleaguered labor movement, which has seen its ranks decline dramatically.

Turn Your Visit Into a Vacation at These 10 Colleges

As a new school year soon begins, millions of parents will start planning family weekend trips to college campuses across the country. The annual rite of passage for non-undergrads typically includes attending football games, enjoying homecoming festivities and exploring charming college towns. Instead, why not explore must-see tourist attractions or discover little-known gems with family members?

10 Low-Cost Online Graduate Education Programs for Out-of-State Students

The U.S. News Short List, separate from our overall rankings, is a regular series that magnifies individual data points in hopes of providing students and parents a way to find which undergraduate or graduate programs excel or have room to grow in specific areas. Be sure to explore The Short List: College, The Short List: Grad School and The Short List: Online Programs to find data that matter to you in your college or grad school search. While earning an online master's degree in education can open the door to a higher salary or a new teaching opportunity -- and some school districts even require it after a couple of years in the profession -- it still comes with the price tag of paying for grad school.

Coming Soon: 2017 Best Colleges Rankings

In just three weeks, on Tuesday, Sept. 13, U.S. News will release the 2017 edition of the Best Colleges rankings. The new edition will include rankings of the four big categories -- National Universities, National Liberal Arts Colleges, Regional Universities and Regional Colleges -- all available on usnews.com. U.S. News groups colleges into categories, based on the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education, to compare schools with similar missions.

John Oliver unloads on charter schools in latest ‘Last Week Tonight’ episode

Comedy Central must be kicking themselves for letting John Oliver go because the former Daily Show comedian has been absolutely killing it on HBO's Last Week Tonight With John Oliver for some time now. Far from your standard satirical or late night show, John Oliver each week chooses one topic to hone in on and then goes after it with surgical-like precision and wit. DON'T MISS:  Samsung’s hot new Galaxy Note 7 still isn’t as fast as last year’s iPhone 6s This past Sunday, Oliver turned his attention to charter schools and highlighted many of the problems associated with them that often get brushed under the rug. While Oliver acknowledges that there are many things to like about charter schools he also isn't afraid to point out their shortcomings. "Charters are basically public schools that are taxpayer-funded but privately run," Oliver explained at the beginning. "The first ones emerged 25 years ago as places to experiment with new educational approaches.” "But critics argue that charters overstate their successes, siphon off talented students and divert precious resources within the school district," Oliver went on to say. "Now for this piece, and I know this is going to make some people on both sides very angry, we're going to set aside whether or not charter schools are a good idea in principle. Because whether they are or not, in 42 states and in D.C. we're doing them. So instead we're going to look at how they operate in practice. One group found on average charters have a slight edge over traditional public schools in reading and about the same in math, but acknowledged charter equality is uneven across the states and across schools and that is putting it mildly." With that contextual backdrop, sit back for a good 18 minutes and enjoy John Oliver at the top of his game. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l_htSPGAY7I

Texas ruling adds to transgender students' back-to-school anxiety

Texas ruling adds to transgender students' back-to-school anxiety

By Colleen Jenkins WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (Reuters) - When Ashley Nurkin's 7-year-old daughter begins second grade in Charlotte, North Carolina, next week, it will be her first time going to school as a girl. "I am dreading having that conversation." The emotional roller-coaster for U.S. transgender students going back to school in the next few weeks hit a new curve when a federal judge in Texas ruled late on Sunday that states did not have to follow Obama administration guidance that public schools should allow students to use bathrooms that correspond with their gender identity. The injunction follows the U.S. Supreme Court's decision earlier in August to halt a lower court ruling that would have permitted a transgender student who was born a girl to use the boys' bathroom at his Virginia high school.

U.S. judge blocks Obama transgender school bathroom policy

U.S. judge blocks Obama transgender school bathroom policy

A U.S. judge blocked an Obama administration policy that public schools should allow transgender students to use the bathrooms of their choice, granting a nationwide injunction sought by 13 dissenting states just in time for the new school year. While a setback for transgender advocates, the ruling is only the latest salvo in a larger legal and cultural battle over transgender rights that could be headed toward the U.S. Supreme Court. Following milestone achievements in gay rights including same-sex marriage becoming legal nationwide in 2015, transgender rights have become an increasingly contentious issue in the United States, with advocates saying the law should afford them the same rights extended to racial and religious minorities.

US judge blocks new transgender school bathroom rules

US judge blocks new transgender school bathroom rules

A US judge has blocked federal guidelines instructing public schools to allow transgender students to use the bathrooms and other private facilities of their choice. US District Judge Reed O'Connor ruled Sunday in favor of Texas and 12 other states, which have sued the federal government over the new rules, meant to create safer environments for transgender students at public school districts and universities. US authorities had issued written guidelines in May, built on existing laws against sexual discrimination, which asked schools to let youths use the bathrooms matching their gender identity rather than the sex on their birth certificate.

Students Are Most Likely to Be Bullied If They Live in These States

Students Are Most Likely to Be Bullied If They Live in These States

Hollywood movies would have us believe that bullying often resembles a group of popular, athletic boys shoving nerdy classmates against lockers in school hallways—or girls trashing their peers in a Mean Girls–style “burn book.” In reality, bullying takes many forms, including name-calling, physical violence, and anonymous verbal abuse typed from behind the safety of a computer screen—and the problem is worse in some states than others. It crunched data from 45 states and the District of Columbia along 17 metrics that fell into three categories: bullying prevalence, bullying impact and treatment, and prevalence of anti-bullying laws. Thanks to its high percentage of high school students being bullied online and on school property, Michigan was found to be the state with the biggest overall bullying problem in the nation.

Why teachers won Detroit's 'sick-out' case

After more than a decade of losing enrollment and amassing debt largely under state-appointed emergency managers, the Detroit public school district could be on the verge of writing a new chapter for itself – one in which educators, students, and parents insist on taking back control of their destiny. Teachers closed schools 14 times during the 2016 school year with strikes protesting the state's emergency management of Detroit schools, The Wall Street Journal reported. Leaders at the state and local level criticized them as hurting the already-struggling effort to educate Detroit's children, but the union insisted the strikes brought attention to problems hurting teachers and students alike.

religion

Indonesian church attacker 'obsessed with IS leader'

Indonesian church attacker 'obsessed with IS leader'

An Indonesian teenager who stabbed a priest in a church and tried to set off a homemade bomb was obsessed with the Islamic State (IS) group leader, a minister said Monday. The 17-year-old attempted Sunday to set off the crude, low-grade explosive as the Catholic priest held mass in the packed church in Medan on Sumatra island, and then stabbed him with a knife. The congregation tackled the attacker after he ran at Father Albert Pandiangan and knifed him, stopping the teenager before he could do more harm.

Indonesian church attacker 'obsessed' with Islamic State leader: senior minister

Indonesian church attacker 'obsessed' with Islamic State leader: senior minister

A knife-wielding Indonesian teen who tried to attack a priest at a church during a Sunday service was "obsessed" with extremist group Islamic State, a senior minister said on Monday. Indonesian authorities are increasingly worried about a resurgence in radicalism in the world's largest Muslim-majority country, driven in part by a new generation of jihadis inspired by Islamic State (IS). "From the cellphone that was seized by security forces, this youth was obsessed with Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi," Chief Security Minister Wiranto told reporters, referring to the leader of the Middle Eastern militant group.

Pope mulls Italy quake visit as survivors dig in

Pope mulls Italy quake visit as survivors dig in

Pope Francis said Sunday he wanted to visit the quake-hit villages of central Italy, as survivors and rescue workers dug in for the long haul with colder weather approaching. Speaking to worshippers in St Peter's Square in Rome, Francis said he wanted to visit those hit by Wednesday's deadly earthquake which brought devastation to a string of mountain villages in a remote area straddling the Umbria, Marche and Lazio regions. With hopes of finding anyone else still alive fading fast, rescue workers and survivors were turning their attention to the future as temperatures start to fall.

Choosing to Stay in the Mormon Church Despite Its Racist Legacy

It’s been six years since I became a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Each year has been a lesson in faith and doubt, stretching and engaging what it means to be black, a woman, and Mormon. The decision to join on my own was not an easy one. As the child of a Protestant mother and a father who converted to Islam in his teens, I was doing something unheard of in my family by becoming a Mormon. And as a black woman, I had a heightened awareness of what it means to potentially be the only black person in any given congregation in the United States.

Would-be bomber's explosives fail in Indonesia church

Would-be bomber's explosives fail in Indonesia church

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — A would-be suicide bomber's explosives failed to detonate in a packed church in western Indonesia during Sunday Mass, and he injured a priest with an axe before being restrained, police said.

Indonesian priest injured in church attack

Indonesian priest injured in church attack

A knife-wielding man stabbed a Catholic priest and tried to set off an explosive device at a church in Indonesia on Sunday, police said, the latest attack on religious minorities in the mainly Muslim country. Priest Albert Pandiangan was holding a mass in the city of Medan on the western island of Sumatra when a young man approached him and stabbed him in his left arm, said local chief detective Nur Fallah. The attacker was carrying a homemade explosive device, said Fallah.

Suspected 'terror' attack at Indonesian church; no serious casualties

Suspected 'terror' attack at Indonesian church; no serious casualties

Indonesian police were investigating a suspected terror attack by a knife-wielding assailant on a priest during the Sunday service at a church, and a bomb squad had been deployed to determine whether the attacker's backpack contained explosives. "A terrorism act was carried out on Sunday morning at the Saint Joseph catholic church," said Rina Sari Ginting, spokeswoman for Medan police in a statement. A bomb squad was sent to the site to check whether the assailant was carrying explosives, in case the attack was a failed suicide bomb attempt.

Vatican says it has high hopes of better ties with China

Vatican says it has high hopes of better ties with China

The Vatican is hopeful it can improve ties with China after decades of tension, the Roman Catholic Church's highest-ranking diplomat said on Saturday, adding that warmer relations would benefit the whole world. Beijing severed links with the Vatican in 1951 shortly after the Communist Party took power and launched a crackdown on organized religion, with China's new rulers setting up their own church and appointing bishops without the pope's backing. After decades of mistrust, Pope Francis is pushing to improve relations and his secretary of state, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, sounded upbeat about the chances of success.

'Religious vote' hears messages from both candidates

'Religious vote' hears messages from both candidates

ATLANTA (AP) — Republican Donald Trump has told conservative evangelical pastors in Florida that his presidency would preserve "religious liberty" and reverse what he insists is a government-enforced muzzling of Christians.

In Israel's religious press, Hillary Clinton is invisible

In Israel's religious press, Hillary Clinton is invisible

BNEI BRAK, Israel (AP) — Hillary Clinton may become the president of Israel's most important ally, but her image is banished from a significant swath of the country's media: the ultra-Orthodox press whose deeply conservative readership chafes at images of women.

Pope dispatches Vatican firefighters to help in Italy quake rescue

Pope Francis on Wednesday dispatched one-sixth of the Vatican's tiny fire department to join rescue efforts following the earthquake that has devastated parts of central Italy. The Vatican said six of its firefighters traveled to the town of Amatrice to help civil protection workers look for survivors still under the rubble and assist those already rescued. Amatrice was one of the small mountain towns wrecked by the quake.

Taiwan vice president to visit Vatican as it eyes better China ties

Taiwan's vice president will next month visit the Vatican, its sole diplomatic ally in Europe, on a trip that could anger China as the Holy See looks for rapprochement with the world's most populous country. Chen Chien-jen will be the special envoy for Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen, who the Vatican invited for a Sept. 4 ceremony to declare Mother Teresa a saint, the Taiwan government said on Wednesday. Tsai leads the independence-leaning ruling Democratic Progressive Party in Taiwan, which Beijing distrusts.

It's Hard to Go to Church

The standard narrative of American religious decline goes something like this: A few hundred years ago, European and American intellectuals began doubting the validity of God as an explanatory mechanism for natural life. As science became a more widely accepted method for investigating and understanding the physical world, religion became a less viable way of thinking—not just about medicine and mechanics, but also culture and politics and economics and every other sphere of public life. As the United States became more secular, people slowly began drifting away from faith.

Feds: Church shooting suspect entrenched in his beliefs

Feds: Church shooting suspect entrenched in his beliefs

A white man charged with the shooting deaths of nine black churchgoers in Charleston “self-radicalized” in the months before the attack and grew more entrenched in his beliefs in white supremacy, according to court papers prosecutors filed this week in federal court. The information filed Monday was part of a list of more than a dozen expert witnesses whom prosecutors intend to call in Dylann Roof’s federal death penalty trial later this year. Roof, 22, is charged in the June 2015 deaths of nine black parishioners at Emanuel AME Church.

Racism and talk of religious war: Trump staff's online posts

Racism and talk of religious war: Trump staff's online posts

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump's paid campaign staffers have declared on their personal social media accounts that Muslims are unfit to be American citizens, ridiculed Mexican accents, called for Secretary of State John Kerry's death by hanging and stated their readiness for a possible civil war, according to a review of their postings by The Associated Press.

Feds: Church shooting suspect 'self-radicalized' pre-attack

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A white man charged with the shooting deaths of nine black churchgoers in Charleston "self-radicalized" in the months before the attack and grew more entrenched in his beliefs in white supremacy, according to court papers prosecutors filed this week in federal court.

politics

Trump hovers over McCain, Rubio U.S. Senate re-election contests

Trump hovers over McCain, Rubio U.S. Senate re-election contests

By Richard Cowan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Republican voters in Arizona and Florida are expected to pick Senators John McCain and Marco Rubio as their respective U.S. Senate nominees when they go to the polls on Tuesday, but one name not on either ballot, Donald Trump, looms large. The Republican presidential nominee has endorsed both McCain and Rubio in their re-election bids even though he has rocky relations with both senators. Trump offended McCain and many other Republicans last year by suggesting that the maverick senator and party's 2008 presidential nominee was anything but a war hero because he was captured during the Vietnam War after his airplane was shot down during a bombing mission.

Clinton aide Abedin leaves husband Weiner after sexting report

Clinton aide Abedin leaves husband Weiner after sexting report

By Amanda Becker WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Huma Abedin, one of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's top aides, said on Monday that she was separating from her husband, Anthony Weiner, after a sex scandal similar to an earlier incident that led him to resign from the U.S. Congress. "After long and painful consideration and work on my marriage, I have made the decision to separate from my husband," Huma Abedin said in a statement.  "Anthony and I remain devoted to doing what is best for our son, who is the light of our life. During this difficult time, I ask for respect for our privacy," Abedin added.

FBI detects breaches against two state voter systems

FBI detects breaches against two state voter systems

By Dustin Volz and Jim Finkle WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Federal Bureau of Investigation has found breaches in Illinois and Arizona's voter registration databases and is urging states to increase computer security ahead of the Nov. 8 presidential election, according to a U.S. official familiar with the probe. The FBI warning in an Aug. 18 flash alert from the agency's Cyber Division did not identify the intruders or the two states targeted. Officials and cyber security experts say recent breaches at the Democratic National Committee and elsewhere in the Democratic Party were likely carried out by people within the Russian government.

California lawmakers pass rape bill inspired by Stanford case

California lawmakers pass rape bill inspired by Stanford case

By Dan Whitcomb LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - California lawmakers, responding to outrage over the six-month jail term given to a former Stanford University swimmer after his conviction for sexually assaulting an unconscious woman, passed legislation on Monday closing a loophole that allowed the sentence. The bill now goes to Democratic Governor Jerry Brown for his approval. The measure was introduced in response to the sentence given to 20-year-old Brock Turner by Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky in June, which was widely condemned as too lenient.

Spate of police officers fatally shot is ‘very chilling’

Virginia state trooper Chad Dermyer, a Marine veteran and father of two, is the 16th law enforcement officer to be killed by a gunman this year — a 129 percent increase over the first three months of 2015. “The numbers are very chilling,” said Jim Pasco, executive director of the Fraternal Order of Police.

FBI Warns of Cyber Attacks on State Election Boards

FBI Warns of Cyber Attacks on State Election Boards

The FBI is warning all states to tighten security measures related to their online election systems after hackers successfully infiltrated one state board of election and targeted another, ABC News has confirmed. “The FBI is requesting that states contact their Board of Elections and determine if any similar activity ... has been detected,” the agency’s Cyber Division said in a bulletin recently sent to private-industry partners across the country. In late June, an “unknown actor scanned a state's Board of Election website for vulnerabilities” and, after identifying a security gap, exploited the vulnerability to conduct a “data exfiltration,” the FBI said in its Aug. 18 “flash” bulletin.

On the Brink: The Story of One French Teenager Who Almost Joined ISIS

On the Brink: The Story of One French Teenager Who Almost Joined ISIS

“I always wanted to preserve [my son] from this,” Fathima said, her face obscured in darkness to conceal her identity. It was Nov. 2014 -- just months after ISIS declared its caliphate across Iraq and Syria -- when her son, Omar, was first approached by Muslim men on the streets across from their suburban home. “They said this [Syria] is where we have to help the Muslim brothers,” Omar told ABC News.

OPINION: LZ Granderson on Trump's Comments to Black Voters

OPINION: LZ Granderson on Trump's Comments to Black Voters

In 1932 a quarter of the American workforce was unemployed, housing prices had fallen by 10.5 percent and President Herbert Hoover’s inability to turn things around paved the way for Franklin D. Roosevelt to win the White House in one of the biggest landslides in presidential election history. I want to talk about how this two-party system has handcuffed black voters but to do so would requires a campfire.

Kerry in India for strategic, commercial talks

Kerry in India for strategic, commercial talks

NEW DELHI (AP) — U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is in India for strategic and commercial talks being held against the backdrop of rising tensions in the disputed region of Kashmir, long a flashpoint between India and rival Pakistan.

Longtime aide Huma Abedin like 'second daughter' to Clinton

Longtime aide Huma Abedin like 'second daughter' to Clinton

SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) — Longtime Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin has won plaudits for her campaign instincts, her deep-rooted loyalty and her glamorous personal style. But she has been thrust into the spotlight for another attribute — as a wronged political wife.

Seattle weighs new rules for businesses with hourly workers

Seattle weighs new rules for businesses with hourly workers

SEATTLE (AP) — Seattle leaders have proposed new rules for retail and food-service businesses with hourly employees, including requiring them to schedule shifts two weeks in advance and compensate workers for some last-minute changes — the latest push by a city that has led the nation in mandating worker benefits.

UN aid contracts 'going to Assad-linked companies'

UN aid contracts 'going to Assad-linked companies'

United Nations aid contracts worth tens of millions of dollars have gone to people closely associated with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad despite US and EU sanctions, the Guardian reported on Tuesday. The Guardian found that two UN agencies had partnered up with the Syria Trust charity, an organisation started and chaired by Assad's wife Asma, spending a total of $8.5 million (7.6 million euros). It also said the UN had given money to the state-owned fuel supplier, which is under EU sanctions, and to Syria's national blood bank, which is controlled by Assad's defence ministry.

Apple ordered to pay record 13 bn-euro Irish tax bill

Apple ordered to pay record 13 bn-euro Irish tax bill

The European Union on Tuesday ordered Apple to pay a record 13 billion euros in back taxes in Ireland, saying deals allowing the US tech giant to pay almost no tax were illegal. In the latest in a series of rulings that has angered Washington, Brussels said the world's most valuable company avoided tax bills on virtually all its profits in the bloc under its arrangements with Dublin. Apple and the Irish government immediately said they would appeal against the European Commission ruling, while the US Treasury said it could undermine its economic partnership with the EU.

Five dead in Shabaab suicide car bomb at Somalia hotel

Five dead in Shabaab suicide car bomb at Somalia hotel

At least five people were killed when jihadists exploded a suicide car bomb outside a popular hotel close to the presidential palace in Somalia's capital Mogadishu on Tuesday. "We have confirmed five people killed including security guards", police officer Mohamed Abdulkadir said, adding that 10 others were wounded.

Three hurt in suicide blast at China's Kyrgyzstan embassy

Three hurt in suicide blast at China's Kyrgyzstan embassy

A van driven by a suicide bomber exploded after ramming through a gate at the Chinese embassy in Kyrgyzstan on Tuesday, injuring three people, authorities said. "As a result of the explosion, only the suicide bomber terrorist died. Security guards were injured," Kyrgyzstan's deputy prime minister Jenish Razakov told journalists at the scene.

France rules out imminent EU-US trade deal, wants talks halted

France rules out imminent EU-US trade deal, wants talks halted

France said Tuesday it wanted to halt thorny EU-US trade talks as President Francois Hollande said there would be no deal at least until after President Barack Obama leaves office in January. Junior trade minister Matthias Fekl said there was "no more political support in France" for the talks because US negotiators were offering "nothing or just crumbs". "France calls for an end to these negotiations," Fekl told RMC radio.

Libya says last chemical weapons stocks shipped out

Libya says last chemical weapons stocks shipped out

Libya has shipped the last of its chemical weapons stocks out of the country, officials said Tuesday, under a UN-backed plan to ensure the arsenal could not fall into the wrong hands. The move will ease fears that extremists like the Islamic State group could gain access to the weapons in Libya, which has been wracked by chaos since the 2011 overthrow of Moamer Kadhafi. A senior security official told AFP the stocks, including 23 tanks of chemicals, were shipped out on a Danish vessel on Saturday from the port of Misrata, under the supervision of the United Nations, and were destined for Germany.

Turkey's Syria operation could spark escalation, warns France

Turkey's Syria operation could spark escalation, warns France

French President Francois Hollande warned Tuesday that "contradictory interventions" by Turkish and Russian forces in Syria could spark an escalation of the conflict. "These multiple, contradictory interventions carry the risk of a wider conflagration," Hollande told a meeting with the diplomatic corps in France, calling for an "absolutely urgent" halt to fighting after Turkey attacked a US-backed Kurdish militia in Syria. "Syria has been living a terrible tragedy for the past five years," Hollande said.

Israel destroys home of Palestinian accused after deadly attack

Israel destroys home of Palestinian accused after deadly attack

Israel's military overnight destroyed the home of a Palestinian accused of involvement in a shooting attack in the occupied West Bank that led to the death of a rabbi, it said Tuesday. The army said it destroyed the home of Mohammed Abed Almajid Mohammed El-Amaira, 38, in Dura, southwest of the West Bank city of Hebron. Amaira, a member of the Palestinian Authority security services, was arrested several weeks ago, accused of having helped plan and carry out the attack on July 1, when gunmen opened fire on a car near Hebron.

Fresh violence overshadows Myanmar peace talks

Fresh violence overshadows Myanmar peace talks

Fresh fighting between ethnic minority rebels and Myanmar's military is overshadowing an upcoming peace conference led by Aung San Suu Kyi's new civilian government, people involved in the talks said Tuesday. The five-day gathering, which officially opens on Wednesday, is Suu Kyi's first big drive to end multiple insurgencies that have raged in Myanmar's borderlands since independence in 1948. Organisers have been pushing for a unilateral ceasefire before the UN-backed talks.

UN hails suspension of France's burkini ban, slams 'stigmatisation'

UN hails suspension of France's burkini ban, slams 'stigmatisation'

The UN on Tuesday welcomed a decision by France's highest administrative court to suspend a controversial ban on burkini swimwear, warning that the ban had fuelled religious intolerance and stigmatisation. "These decrees do not improve the security situation but rather fuel religious intolerance and the stigmatisation of Muslims in France, especially women," Rupert Colville, spokesman for the UN rights office, told reporters.

Israel calls UN criticism of settlement building 'absurd'

Israel calls UN criticism of settlement building 'absurd'

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's office on Tuesday called criticism of Israeli settlement building "absurd" after a UN envoy strongly hit out at his government over the issue. "The claim that it is illegal for Jews to build in Jerusalem is as absurd as saying Americans can't build in Washington or the French can't build in Paris," Netanyahu spokesman David Keyes said in a statement. Nickolay Mladenov, the UN coordinator for the Middle East peace process, told the Security Council on Monday that Israeli settlement expansion has surged in the two months since a key report called for a halt.

Gabon braces for results of tense election

Gabon braces for results of tense election

Gabon braced for possible violence Tuesday as the country awaited official results from a bitterly disputed presidential election, with both sides claiming victory in a vote condemned by EU observers as lacking transparency. The interior minister is due to announce later Tuesday whether incumbent Ali Bongo has won a new term or been ousted by challenger Jean Ping, and there are fears that the tensions may erupt into a repeat of the violence seen after the disputed 2009 election.

Germany's EU commissioner doubts Brexit will happen

Germany's EU commissioner doubts Brexit will happen

Germany's EU Commissioner Guenther Oettinger raised doubts Tuesday about whether Britain would leave the bloc, saying he wouldn't bet on "Brexit". Oettinger told Germany's daily Bild that he assumed June's referendum outcome in favour of Britain exiting the EU was "binding". "But it is possible that public opinion will tip if the economic situation in the wake of the Brexit vote worsens," said Oettinger, who is Digital Economy Commissioner.

'Russian hackers' attack two US voter databases

'Russian hackers' attack two US voter databases

Russian-based hackers may have been responsible for two recent attempts to breach US voter registration databases in two states, raising fears Moscow is trying to undermine November's presidential election, US media said Monday. The incidents led the FBI to send a "flash alert" to election officials earlier this month, asking them to watch for similar cyber-attacks. The FBI alert, first reported by Yahoo News, did not mention Russia.

Brazil's Rousseff urges vote against 'coup' in trial

Brazil's Rousseff urges vote against 'coup' in trial

Declaring her innocence and recalling how she was tortured under Brazil's military dictatorship in the 1970s, Rousseff warned that Latin America's biggest country was on the verge of losing its democracy. "Vote against impeachment, vote for democracy.... Do not accept a coup," the 68-year-old leftist leader said as she defended herself before senators who are widely expected to remove her from office by Wednesday. About 2,000 supporters rallied in her support near the Senate building in the capital Brasilia, waving flags -- a fraction of the crowds her Workers' Party has drawn in the past.

Mexico police chief fired over execution allegations

Mexico police chief fired over execution allegations

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto fired federal police chief Enrique Galindo on Monday over allegations police summarily executed at least 22 suspected members of a drugs cartel and killed eight others during a protest. "In light of the recent events and on instructions of the president, Police Commissioner Enrique Galindo has been removed from his position," Interior Secretary Miguel Angel Osorio Chong said in a statement. The move comes after the National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) issued a scathing report earlier this month indicating police had "arbitrarily executed" 22 civilians during an anti-drug operation in May 2015 on a ranch in the town of Tanhuato, in the western state of Michoacan.

Analysis: Where next for S.Sudan and rebel chief Machar?

Analysis: Where next for S.Sudan and rebel chief Machar?

War-torn South Sudan's slide into chaos resumed last month with fresh fighting in the capital Juba that forced rebel leader turned vice president and peace deal signatory Riek Machar to flee. A year-old peace deal was only partly implemented and, as July's battles showed, was insufficient to stop the war -- yet regional and foreign powers cling to it as the country's only hope. Is there still a peace agreement in South Sudan?

Colombia ceasefire ends half-century war with FARC

Colombia ceasefire ends half-century war with FARC

An historic ceasefire came into effect in Colombia, ending a 52-year war between FARC rebels and the government and taking a major step toward ending a conflict that has claimed more than 250,000 lives. The full ceasefire ordered by President Juan Manuel Santos and the head of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), Timoleon Jimenez, began at midnight (0500 GMT). "This August 29 a new phase of history begins for Colombia.

Some 6,500 migrants rescued off Libya: Italian coastguard

Some 6,500 migrants rescued off Libya: Italian coastguard

Around 6,500 migrants were rescued off the coast of Libya, the Italian coastguard said, in one of its busiest days of life-saving in recent years. A five-day-old baby was among those rescued along with other infants and was airlifted to an Italian hospital, according to Doctors Without Borders (MSF), which took part in operations. "The command centre coordinated 40 rescue operations" that included vessels from Italy, humanitarian organisations as well as the EU's border agency Frontex, saving 6,500 migrants, the coastguard wrote on Twitter.

'Teammates' Qatar and Turkey assert post-coup ties

'Teammates' Qatar and Turkey assert post-coup ties

With his fate still uncertain just hours after the launch of the July 15 coup, Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan received his first call of support from a foreign leader. On the other end of the line was Qatar's emir, Tamim bin Hamad Al-Thani, giving his unequivocal backing for the embattled leader, Erdogan told Turkish media. "It was a significant show of political support at a time when the situation in Turkey was still highly uncertain," said Rice University's Kristian Coates Ulrichsen.

crime-trials

Exclusive: Six U.S. senators urge Obama to prioritize cyber crime at G20 summit

Exclusive: Six U.S. senators urge Obama to prioritize cyber crime at G20 summit

By Jonathan Spicer NEW YORK (Reuters) - Six U.S. senators have urged President Barack Obama to prioritize cyber crime at this weekend's Group of 20 summit in China, in the wake of the theft of $81 million from Bangladesh's central bank, according to a letter obtained by Reuters. In the letter sent to the White House ahead of the Sept. 4-5 summit, Sherrod Brown, a senior Democrat on the Senate Banking Committee, and five other Democratic senators say they want the U.S. president to press leaders from the world's 20 biggest economies to commit in joint communiques to a "coordinated strategy to combat cyber-crime at critical financial institutions." The letter, dated Monday, suggests that concern among U.S. lawmakers is growing over the February incident in which hackers breached Bangladesh Bank's systems and used the SWIFT banking network to request nearly $1 billion from an account held at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Reward offered for capture of fugitive polygamist from Utah

Reward offered for capture of fugitive polygamist from Utah

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Federal authorities hope a $50,000 reward announced Monday, coupled with a falling out between polygamist fugitive Lyle Jeffs and his brother — imprisoned sect leader Warren Jeffs — will lead someone to reveal his whereabouts.

HSBC executive pleads not guilty in U.S. over forex scheme

HSBC executive pleads not guilty in U.S. over forex scheme

A senior HSBC Holdings Plc executive pleaded not guilty on Monday to charges that he participated in a fraudulent scheme to front-run a $3.5 billion currency transaction by one of the bank's clients. The plea on wire fraud and conspiracy charges by Mark Johnson, a British citizen who at the time of his arrest last month was HSBC's global head of foreign exchange cash trading, was entered by his lawyer in federal court in Brooklyn. "He pleaded not guilty because he is not guilty," Frank Wohl, the lawyer, said after the hearing.

Brussels crime lab attacked, five arrested

Brussels crime lab attacked, five arrested

Several attackers rammed a car through the gates of Belgium's national crime laboratory on Monday in Brussels and then started a fire in what prosecutors said may have been an attempt to destroy evidence. The incident comes as Belgium remains on high alert following suicide attacks on the city's airport and metro in March which were claimed by the Islamic State group. "Several attackers forced their way into the institute using their car and were able to attack the building," said Ine Van Wymersch, a spokesman for the Brussels prosecutor's office.

Give arrested aid worker fair trial, Amnesty tells Israel

Give arrested aid worker fair trial, Amnesty tells Israel

Amnesty International on Monday called on Israel to give an aid worker charged with aiding the Islamist movement Hamas a "fair and open trial", citing allegations of abuse in custody. "The Israeli authorities must immediately investigate the allegations that Mohammed Halabi was mistreated in custody and may have been forced into 'confessing' under duress," it added. On August 4 an Israeli court charged Halabi, the Gaza director of the World Vision NGO, with having chanelled millions of dollars in foreign aid to the Palestinian Islamist movement Hamas and its armed wing.